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Choctaw
The Choctaw
Choctaw
(In the Choctaw
Choctaw
language, Chahta)[note 1] are a Native American people originally occupying what is now the Southeastern United States
United States
(modern-day Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, and Louisiana). Their Choctaw language
Choctaw language
belongs to the Muskogean
Muskogean
language family group. Hopewell and Mississippian cultures, who lived throughout the east of the Mississippi
Mississippi
River valley and its tributaries. About 1,700 years ago, the Hopewell people built Nanih Waiya, a great earthwork mound located in what is central present-day Mississippi. It is still considered sacred by the Choctaw. The early Spanish explorers of the mid-16th century in the Southeast encountered Mississippian-culture villages and chiefs.[2] The anthropologist John R
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Paleo-Indians
Paleo-Indians, Paleoindians or Paleoamericans is a classification term given to the first peoples who entered, and subsequently inhabited, the Americas
Americas
during the final glacial episodes of the late Pleistocene period. The prefix "paleo-" comes from the Greek adjective palaios (παλαιός), meaning "old" or "ancient". The term "Paleo-Indians" applies specifically to the lithic period in the Western Hemisphere and is distinct from the term "Paleolithic".[1] Evidence suggests big-animal hunters crossed the Bering Strait
Bering Strait
from North Asia
North Asia
into America over a land and ice bridge (Beringia). This bridge existed between 45,000–12,000 BCE (47,000–14,000 BP).[2] Small isolated groups of hunter-gatherers migrated alongside herds of large herbivores far into Alaska
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Southeastern United States
The Southeastern United States
United States
is the eastern portion of the Southern United States, and the southern portion of the Eastern United States. It comprises 12 states in the southern United States.Contents1 Demographics1.1 Most populous states2 History2.1 Culture 2.2 Climate3 Economy3.1 Research and development4 Education4.1 Higher education5 Largest cities 6 Metropolitan Statistical Areas 7 Combined Statistical Areas 8 Fauna 9 Sports 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksDemographics[edit] There is no official Census Bureau
Census Bureau
definition of the southeastern United States
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Tribal College
Tribal colleges and universities
Tribal colleges and universities
are a category of higher education, minority-serving institutions in the United States. Defined in Higher Education Act of 1965 the term ‘‘Tribal College or University’’ means an institution that qualifies for funding under the Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities Assistance Act of 1978 (25 U.S.C. 1801 et seq.) or the Navajo Community College Act (25 U.S.C. 640a note); or is cited in section 532 of the Equity in Educational Land-Grant Status Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 301 note). The educational institutions are distinguished by being controlled and operated by American Indian tribes; they have become part of American Indians' institution-building in order to pass on their own cultures. The first was founded by the Navajo Nation
Navajo Nation
in 1968 in Arizona, and several others were established in the 1970s
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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British Empire
The British Empire
Empire
comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states. It originated with the overseas possessions and trading posts established by England
England
between the late 16th and early 18th centuries. At its height, it was the largest empire in history and, for over a century, was the foremost global power.[1] By 1913, the British Empire
Empire
held sway over 412 million people, 7001230000000000000♠23% of the world population at the time,[2] and by 1920, it covered 35,500,000 km2 (13,700,000 sq mi),[3] 7001240000000000000♠24% of the Earth's total land area.[4] As a result, its political, legal, linguistic and cultural legacy is widespread
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Thirteen Colonies
The Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
were a group of British colonies on the east coast of North America
North America
founded in the 17th and 18th centuries that declared independence in 1776 and formed the United States
United States
of America. The Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
had very similar political, constitutional, and legal systems and were dominated by Protestant English-speakers. They were part of Britain's possessions in the New World, which also included colonies in Canada and the Caribbean, as well as East and West Florida. In the 18th century, the British government operated its colonies under a policy of mercantilism, in which the central government administered its possessions for the economic benefit of the mother country
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American Revolution
The American Revolution
Revolution
was a colonial revolt that took place between 1765 and 1783. The American Patriots in the Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
won independence from Great Britain, becoming the United States
United States
of America. They defeated the British in the American Revolutionary War in alliance with France and others. Members of American colonial society argued the position of "no taxation without representation", starting with the Stamp Act Congress in 1765. They rejected the authority of the British Parliament to tax them because they lacked members in that governing body
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English Colonization Of The Americas
The British colonization of the Americas
British colonization of the Americas
(including colonization by both the English and the Scots) began in 1607 in Jamestown, Virginia, and reached its peak when colonies had been established throughout the Americas. The English, and later the British, were among the most important colonizers of the Americas, and their American empire came to rival the Spanish American colonies in military and economic might. Three types of colonies were established in the English overseas possessions in America of the 17th century and continued into the British Empire
British Empire
at the height of its power in the 18th century. These were charter colonies, proprietary colonies, and royal colonies. A group of 13 British American colonies collectively broke from the British Empire
British Empire
in the 1770s through a successful revolution, establishing the modern United States
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French Colonization Of The Americas
The French colonization of the Americas
French colonization of the Americas
began in the 16th century, and continued on into the following centuries as France
France
established a colonial empire in the Western Hemisphere. France
France
founded colonies in much of eastern North America, on a number of Caribbean islands, and in South America. Most colonies were developed to export products such as fish, rice sugar, and furs. As they colonized the New World, the French established forts and settlements that would become such cities as Quebec
Quebec
and Montreal
Montreal
in Canada; Detroit, Green Bay, St
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Anthropologist
An anthropologist is a person engaged in the practice of anthropology. Anthropology
Anthropology
is the study of various aspects of humans within past and present societies.[1][2][3] Social anthropology, cultural anthropology, and philosophical anthropology study the norms and values of societies. Linguistic anthropology studies how language affects social life, while economic anthropology studies human economic behavior. Biological (physical), forensic, and medical anthropology study the biological development of humans, the application of biological anthropology in a legal setting, and the study of diseases and their impacts on humans over time, respectively.Contents1 Education 2 Career 3 Further reading 4 See also 5 ReferencesEducation[edit] Anthropologists usually cover a breadth of topics within anthropology in their undergraduate education, and then proceed to specialize in topics of their own choice at the graduate level
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Spanish Colonization Of The Americas
The overseas expansion under the crown of Castile was initiated under the royal authority and first accomplished by the Spanish conquistadores. The Americas
Americas
were incorporated into the Spanish Empire, with the exception of Brazil and Canada, and the crown created civil and religious structures to administer the region
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Earthworks (engineering)
Earthworks are engineering works created through the processing of parts of the earth's surface involving quantities of soil or unformed rock.Contents1 Types of excavation 2 Civil engineering use 3 Military use 4 Equipment 5 Mass haul planning 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksTypes of excavation[edit]Earth moving equipment (circa 1922)Flattened and leveled construction site
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Mississippi River
The Mississippi
Mississippi
River
River
is the chief river of the second-largest drainage system on the North American continent, second only to the Hudson Bay
Hudson Bay
drainage system.[13][14] The stream is entirely within the United States
United States
(although its drainage basin reaches into Canada), its source is in northern Minnesota
Minnesota
and it flows generally south for 2,320 miles (3,730 km)[14] to the Mississippi
Mississippi
River
River
Delta in the Gulf of Mexico. With its many tributaries, the Mississippi's watershed drains all or parts of 31 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces between the Rocky and Appalachian Mountains. The Mississippi
Mississippi
ranks as the fourth-longest and fifteenth-largest river in the world by discharge
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Hopewell Tradition
The Hopewell tradition
Hopewell tradition
(also called the Hopewell culture) describes the common aspects of the Native American culture that flourished along rivers in the northeastern and midwestern United States
United States
from 200 BCE to 500 CE, in the Middle Woodland
Middle Woodland
period. The Hopewell tradition was not a single culture or society, but a widely dispersed set of related populations. They were connected by a common network of trade routes,[1] known as the Hopewell exchange system. At its greatest extent, the Hopewell exchange system ran from the Crystal River Indian Mounds
Crystal River Indian Mounds
in modern-day Florida
Florida
as far north as the Canadian shores of Lake Ontario. Within this area, societies participated in a high degree of exchange with the highest amount of activity along waterways
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Mound
A mound is a heaped pile of earth, gravel, sand, rocks, or debris. Most commonly, mounds are earthen formations such as hills and mountains, particularly if they appear artificial. A mound may be any rounded area of topographically higher elevation on any surface. Artificial mounds have been created for a variety of reasons throughout history, including ceremonial (platform mound), burial (tumulus), and commemorative purposes (e.g
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