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Chloris
In Greek mythology, the name Chloris
Chloris
(/ˈklɔːrɪs/; Greek Χλωρίς Khlōris, from χλωρός khlōros, meaning "greenish-yellow", "pale green", "pale", "pallid", or "fresh") appears in a variety of contexts. Some clearly refer to different characters; other stories may refer to the same Chloris, but disagree on details.Contents1 Chloris, the Nymph 2 Chloris, wife of Neleus 3 Chloris, the Niobid 4 Chloris, mother of Mopsus 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksChloris, the Nymph[edit] Chloris
Chloris
was a Nymph
Nymph
who was associated with spring, flowers and new growth, believed to have dwelt in the Elysian Fields. Myths had it that she was abducted by Zephyrus, the god of the west wind (which, as Ovid
Ovid
himself points out, was a parallel to the story of his brother Boreas and Oreithyia), who transformed her into a deity known as Flora after they were married
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Fasti (Ovid)
The Fasti
Fasti
(Latin: Fastorum Libri Sex, "Six Books of the Calendar"), sometimes translated as The Book of Days or On the Roman Calendar, is a six-book Latin poem written by the Roman poet Ovid
Ovid
and published in 8 AD. Ovid
Ovid
is believed to have left the Fasti
Fasti
incomplete when he was exiled to Tomis by the emperor Augustus
Augustus
in 8 AD. Written in elegiac couplets and drawing on conventions of Greek and Latin didactic poetry, the Fasti
Fasti
is structured as a series of eye-witness reports and interviews by the first-person vates ("poet-prophet" or "bard") with Roman deities, who explain the origins of Roman holidays and associated customs—often with multiple aetiologies. The poem is a significant, and in some cases unique, source of fact in studies of religion in ancient Rome; and the influential anthropologist and ritualist
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Orchomenus (Boeotia)
Orchomenus (Ancient Greek: Ὀρχομενός Orchomenos), the setting for many early Greek myths, is best known as a rich archaeological site in Boeotia, Greece, that was inhabited from the Neolithic
Neolithic
through the Hellenistic
Hellenistic
periods. Orchomenus is also referenced as the "Minyean Orchomenus" in order to distinguish the city from the "Arcadian Orchomenus".Contents1 Ancient history 2 Archaeology 3 Art and Sculpture 4 Municipality 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksAncient history[edit]Map of ancient Boeotia
Boeotia
indicating Orchomenus, the centre of the Minyans.The acropolisAccording to the founding myth of Orchomenos, its royal dynasty had been established by the Minyans, who had followed their eponymous leader Minyas from coastal Thessaly
Thessaly
to settle the site
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Argos
Argos
Argos
(/ˈɑːrɡɒs, -ɡəs/; Modern Greek: Άργος [ˈarɣos]; Ancient Greek: Ἄργος [árɡos]) is a city in Argolis, the Peloponnese, Greece
Greece
and once was one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world.[citation needed] It is the biggest town in Argolis
Argolis
and a major centre for the area. Since the 2011 local government reform it has been part of the municipality of Argos-Mykines, of which it is a municipal unit.[2] The municipal unit has an area of 138.138 km2.[3] It is 11 kilometres (7 miles) from Nafplion, which was its historic harbour
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Artemis
Artemis
Artemis
(/ˈɑːrtɪmɪs/; Greek: Ἄρτεμις Artemis, Attic Greek: [ár.te.mis]) was one of the most widely venerated of the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
deities. Her Roman equivalent is Diana.[2] Some scholars[3] believe that the name, and indeed the goddess herself, was originally pre-Greek.[4] Homer
Homer
refers to her as Artemis
Artemis
Agrotera, Potnia Theron: " Artemis
Artemis
of the wildland, Mistress of Animals".[5] The Arcadians believed she was the daughter of Demeter.[6] In the classical period of Greek mythology, Artemis
Artemis
was often described as the daughter of Zeus
Zeus
and Leto, and the twin sister of Apollo
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Elatus
There were several figures named Elatus /ˈɛlətəs/ or Élatos (Ἔλατος) in Greek mythology.Elatus, a Lapith
Lapith
chieftain of Larissa, Thessaly. He was the father, by Hippeia, of Caeneus,[1] Polyphemus,[2][3][4] and Ischys who was beloved by Coronis,[5][6] and a daughter Dotia, possibly the eponym of Dotion (Dotium) in Thessaly[7] (see also Dotis). He was also the father of the seer Ampycus.[8] He might be a descendant or even a son of Ares when his son Ampycus was called a scion of the said god.[9] Elatus, a centaur, killed during a battle with Heracles
Heracles
by a poisoned arrow that passed through his arm and continued to wound Chiron
Chiron
in the knee.[10]The asteroid 31824 Elatus is named after this figure.Elatus, one of the suitors of Penelope, killed by Eumaeus.[11] Elatus, a son of Arcas, brother of Apheidas and Azan
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Polygnotus
Polygnotus /ˌpɒlɪɡˈnoʊtəs/ (Greek: Πολύγνωτος Polygnotos) was an ancient Greek painter from the middle of the 5th century BC.Contents1 Life 2 References2.1 Citations 2.2 BibliographyLife[edit] He was the son and pupil of Aglaophon.[1] He was a native of Thasos, but was adopted by the Athenians, and admitted to their citizenship. During the time of Cimon, Polygnotus painted for the Athenians a picture of the taking of Troy
Troy
on the walls of the Stoa Poikile, and another of the marriage of the daughters of Leucippus
Leucippus
in the Anacaeum. Plutarch
Plutarch
mentions that historians and the poet Melanthius attest that Polygnotus did not paint for the money but rather out of a charitable feeling towards the Athenian people
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Hades
Hades
Hades
(/ˈheɪdiːz/; Greek: ᾍδης Háidēs) was the ancient Greek chthonic god of the underworld, which eventually took his name.[1] In Greek mythology, Hades
Hades
was regarded as the oldest son of Cronus
Cronus
and Rhea, although the last son regurgitated by his father.[2] He and his brothers Zeus
Zeus
and Poseidon
Poseidon
defeated their father's generation of gods, the Titans, and claimed rulership over the cosmos. Hades
Hades
received the underworld, Zeus
Zeus
the sky, and Poseidon
Poseidon
the sea, with the solid earth—long the province of Gaia—available to all three concurrently
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Odysseus
Odysseus
Odysseus
(/oʊˈdɪsiəs, oʊˈdɪsjuːs/; Greek: Ὀδυσσεύς, Ὀδυσεύς [odysse͜ús]), also known by the Latin
Latin
variant Ulysses (US: /juːˈlɪsiːz/, UK: /ˈjuːlɪsiːz/; Latin: Ulyssēs, Ulixēs), is a legendary Greek king of Ithaca
Ithaca
and the hero of Homer's epic poem the Odyssey. Odysseus
Odysseus
also plays a key role in Homer's Iliad and other works in that same epic cycle. Son of Laërtes and Anticlea, husband of Penelope
Penelope
and father of Telemachus, Odysseus
Odysseus
is renowned for his intellectual brilliance, guile, and versatility (polytropos), and is thus known by the epithet Odysseus
Odysseus
the Cunning (mētis, or "cunning intelligence")
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Poseidon
Poseidon
Poseidon
(/pəˈsaɪdən, pɒ-, poʊ-/;[1] Greek: Ποσειδῶν, pronounced [pose͜edɔ́͜ɔn]) was one of the Twelve Olympians in ancient Greek religion and myth. He was god of the Sea and other waters; of earthquakes; and of horses.[2] In pre-Olympian Bronze Age Greece, he was venerated as a chief deity at Pylos
Pylos
and Thebes.[2] Poseidon
Poseidon
was protector of seafarers, and of many Hellenic cities and colonies. In Homer's Iliad, Poseidon
Poseidon
supports the Greeks against the Trojans during the Trojan War
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Argonauts
The Argonauts
Argonauts
(/ˈɑːrɡəˌnɔːt, -ˌnɒt/; Greek: Ἀργοναῦται Argonautai) were a band of heroes in Greek mythology, who in the years before the Trojan War, around 1300 BC,[1] accompanied Jason
Jason
to Colchis
Colchis
in his quest to find the Golden Fleece. Their name comes from their ship, Argo, named after its builder, Argus. "Argonauts" literally means " Argo
Argo
sailors"
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Ovid
Publius Ovidius Naso (Classical Latin: [ˈpu:.blɪ.ʊs ɔˈwɪ.dɪ.ʊs ˈnaː.soː]; 20 March 43 BC – AD 17/18), known as Ovid
Ovid
(/ˈɒvɪd/)[1] in the English-speaking world, was a Roman poet who lived during the reign of Augustus. He was a contemporary of the older Virgil
Virgil
and Horace, with whom he is often ranked as one of the three canonical poets of Latin
Latin
literature. The Imperial scholar Quintilian
Quintilian
considered him the last of the Latin
Latin
love elegists.[2] He enjoyed enormous popularity, but, in one of the mysteries of literary history, was sent by Augustus
Augustus
into exile in a remote province on the Black Sea, where he remained until his death
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Argonautica Orphica
Argonautica
Argonautica
Orphica (Greek: Ὀρφέως Ἀργοναυτικά) is a Greek epic poem dating from the 5th–6th centuries CE. It is narrated in the first person in the name of Orpheus
Orpheus
and tells the story of Jason
Jason
and the Argonauts. It is not known who the real author is. The poem is found in manuscripts either on its own or together with the Orphic Hymns and other hymns such as the Homeric Hymns and those of Proclus and Callimachus. Another related work is the Lithica (describing the properties and symbolism of different stones). The narrative is basically similar to that in other versions of the story, such as the Argonautica
Argonautica
of Apollonius Rhodius, on which it is probably based. The main differences are the emphasis on the role of Orpheus
Orpheus
and a more mythological, less realistic technique of narration
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Pylos
Pylos
Pylos
((UK: /ˈpaɪlɒs/, US: /ˈpaɪloʊs/; Greek: Πύλος), historically also known under its Italian name Navarino, is a town and a former municipality in Messenia, Peloponnese, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Pylos-Nestoras, of which it is the seat and a municipal unit.[2] It was the capital of the former Pylia Province. It is the main harbour on the Bay of Navarino. Nearby villages include Gialova, Pyla, Elaiofyto, Schinolakka, and Palaionero. The town of Pylos
Pylos
has 2,767 inhabitants, the municipal unit of Pylos
Pylos
5,287 (2011)
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Sic
The Latin
Latin
adverb sic ("thus", "just as"; in full: sic erat scriptum, "thus was it written")[1] inserted after a quoted word or passage indicates that the quoted matter has been transcribed exactly as found in the source text, complete with any erroneous or archaic spelling, surprising assertion, faulty reasoning, or other matter that might otherwise be taken as an error of transcription. The usual usage is to inform the reader that any errors or apparent errors in quoted material do not arise from errors in the course of the transcription, but are intentionally reproduced, exactly as they appear in the source text
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Persephone
In Greek mythology, Persephone
Persephone
(/pərˈsɛfəni/; Greek: Περσεφόνη), also called Kore (/ˈkɔːriː/; "the maiden"), is the daughter of Zeus
Zeus
and Demeter
Demeter
and is the queen of the underworld. Homer
Homer
describes her as the formidable, venerable majestic princess of the underworld, who carries into effect the curses of men upon the souls of the dead. Persephone
Persephone
was married to Hades, the god of the underworld.[1] The myth of her abduction represents her function as the personification of vegetation, which shoots forth in spring and withdraws into the earth after harvest; hence, she is also associated with spring as well as the fertility of vegetation
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