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Chipmunk
3, see textChipmunks are small, striped rodents of the family Sciuridae. Chipmunks are found in North America, with the exception of the Siberian chipmunk
Siberian chipmunk
which is found primarily in Asia.Contents1 Taxonomy and systematics 2 Diet 3 Ecology and life history 4 Species 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksTaxonomy and systematics Chipmunks may be classified either as a single genus, Tamias (Greek: ταμίας), or as three genera: Tamias, which includes the eastern chipmunk; Eutamias, which includes the Siberian chipmunk; a
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Mountain Bluebird
The mountain bluebird (Sialia currucoides) is a medium-sized bird weighing about 30 g (1.1 oz) with a length from 16–20 cm (6.3–7.9 in). They have light underbellies and black eyes. Adult males have thin bills and are bright turquoise-blue and somewhat lighter underneath. Adult females have duller blue wings and tail, grey breast, grey crown, throat and back. In fresh fall plumage, the female's throat and breast are tinged with red-orange, brownish near the flank contrasting with white tail underparts. Their call is a thin 'few'; while their song is warbled high 'chur chur'. It is the state bird of Idaho
Idaho
and Nevada. It is an omnivore and it can live 6 to 10 years in the wild. It eats spiders, grasshoppers, flies and other insects, and small fruits
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Nut (fruit)
A nut is a fruit composed of an inedible hard shell and a seed, which is generally edible. In general usage, a wide variety of dried seeds are called nuts, but in a botanical context "nut" implies that the shell does not open to release the seed (indehiscent). The translation of "nut" in certain languages frequently requires paraphrases, as the word is ambiguous.Nuts being sold in a marketMost seeds come from fruits that naturally free themselves from the shell, unlike nuts such as hazelnuts, chestnuts, and acorns, which have hard shell walls and originate from a compound ovary. The general and original usage of the term is less restrictive, and many nuts (in the culinary sense), such as almonds, pecans, pistachios, walnuts, and Brazil nuts,[1] are not nuts in a botanical sense
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South Korea
Coordinates: 36°N 128°E / 36°N 128°E / 36; 128 Republic
Republic
of Korea 대한민국 Daehan MingukFlagEmblemMotto: "홍익인간 (弘益人間)" (Korean) (de facto) "Benefit broadly in the human world / Devotion to the Welfare of Humanity"[1]Anthem:  Aegukga
Aegukga
"애국가 (愛國歌)" (Korean) (de facto) "Patriotic Song"Government Emblem대한민국정부 상징문양 (Korean) Government Emblem of South KoreaArea controlled by South Korea
Korea
is shown in dark green; South Korean-claimed but uncontrolled regions shown in light green.Status Sovereign stateCapital and largest city Seoul 37°33′N 126°58′E / 37.550°N 126.967°E / 37.550; 126.967Official languages Korean Korean Sign Language[2]Official script HangulEthnic groups Predominately Korean
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Miocene
The Miocene
Miocene
( /ˈmaɪəˌsiːn/[2][3]) is the first geological epoch of the Neogene
Neogene
Period and extends from about 23.03 to 5.333 million years ago (Ma). The Miocene
Miocene
was named by Charles Lyell; its name comes from the Greek words μείων (meiōn, “less”) and καινός (kainos, “new”)[4] and means "less recent" because it has 18% fewer modern sea invertebrates than the Pliocene. The Miocene follows the Oligocene
Oligocene
and is followed by the Pliocene. As the earth went from the Oligocene
Oligocene
through the Miocene
Miocene
and into the Pliocene, the climate slowly cooled towards a series of ice ages
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Zion National Park
Zion National Park
Zion National Park
is a United States
United States
National Park located in southwestern Utah, near the city of Springdale. A prominent feature of the 229-square-mile (590 km2) park is Zion Canyon, which stretches 15 miles (24 km) long and spans up to half a mile (800 m) deep. It cuts through the reddish and tan-colored Navajo Sandstone
Sandstone
by the North Fork of the Virgin River
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Utah
Utah
Utah
(/ˈjuːtɔː/ YOO-taw, /-tɑː/ -tah  listen) is a state in the western United States. It became the 45th state admitted to the U.S. on January 4, 1896. Utah
Utah
is the 13th-largest by area, 31st-most-populous, and 10th-least-densely populated of the 50 United States. Utah
Utah
has a population of more than 3 million (Census estimate for July 1, 2016)
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Ottawa Language
Ottawa
Ottawa
(or Odawa) is a dialect of the Ojibwe language, spoken by the Ottawa people
Ottawa people
in southern Ontario
Ontario
in Canada, and northern Michigan
Michigan
in the United States. Descendants of migrant Ottawa
Ottawa
speakers live in Kansas
Kansas
and Oklahoma
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Oxford English Dictionary
The Oxford
Oxford
English Dictionary (OED) is the main historical dictionary of the English language, published by the Oxford University
Oxford University
Press. It traces the historical development of the English language, providing a comprehensive resource to scholars and academic researchers, as well as describing usage in its many variations throughout the world.[2][3] The second edition came to 21,728 pages in 20 volumes, published in 1989. Work began on the dictionary in 1857, but it was not until 1884 that it began to be published in unbound fascicles as work continued on the project, under the name of A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles; Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by The Philological Society
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John James Audubon
John James Audubon
John James Audubon
(born Jean Rabin; April 26, 1785 – January 27, 1851) was an American ornithologist, naturalist, and painter. He was notable for his extensive studies documenting all types of American birds and for his detailed illustrations that depicted the birds in their natural habitats. His major work, a color-plate book entitled The Birds of America
The Birds of America
(1827–1839), is considered one of the finest ornithological works ever completed
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Bud
In botany, a bud is an undeveloped or embryonic shoot and normally occurs in the axil of a leaf or at the tip of a stem. Once formed, a bud may remain for some time in a dormant condition, or it may form a shoot immediately. Buds may be specialized to develop flowers or short shoots, or may have the potential for general shoot development. The term bud is also used in zoology, where it refers to an outgrowth from the body which can develop into a new individual.Contents1 Overview 2 Types of buds2.1 Image gallery3 Within zoology 4 ReferencesOverview[edit] Inflorescence
Inflorescence
bud scales in Halesia carolinaThe buds of many woody plants, especially in temperate or cold climates, are protected by a covering of modified leaves called scales which tightly enclose the more delicate parts of the bud. Many bud scales are covered by a gummy substance which serves as added protection
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Marmot
15, see textMarmots are large squirrels in the genus Marmota, with 15 species.Contents1 Biology 2 Subgenera and species 3 History and etymology 4 Examples of species 5 References 6 External linksBiology[edit] Some species live in mountainous areas, such as the Alps, northern Apennines, Carpathians, Tatras, and Pyrenees
Pyrenees
in Europe and northwestern Asia; the Rocky Mountains, Black Hills, the Cascade and Pacific Ranges, and the Sierra Nevada in North America; and the Deosai Plateau in Pakistan
Pakistan
and Ladakh
Ladakh
in India. Other species prefer rough grassland and can be found widely across North America
North America
and the Eurasian Steppe
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Fungi
Dikarya
Dikarya
(inc. Deuteromycota)AscomycotaPezizomycotina Saccharomycotina TaphrinomycotinaBasidiomycotaAgaricomycotina Pucciniomycotina UstilaginomycotinaSubphyla incertae sedisEntomophthoromycotina Kickxellomycotina Mucoromycotina ZoopagomycotinaA fungus (plural: fungi[3] or funguses[4]) is any member of the group of eukaryotic organisms that includes microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as the more familiar mushrooms. These organisms are classified as a kingdom, Fungi, which is separate from the other eukaryotic life kingdoms of plants and animals. A characteristic that places fungi in a different kingdom from plants, bacteria, and some protists is chitin in their cell walls. Similar to animals, fungi are heterotrophs; they acquire their food by absorbing dissolved molecules, typically by secreting digestive enzymes into their environment. Fungi do not photosynthesise
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Arthropod
Condylipoda Latreille, 1802An arthropod (from Greek ἄρθρον arthron, "joint" and πούς pous, "foot") is an invertebrate animal having an exoskeleton (external skeleton), a segmented body, and paired jointed appendages. Arthropods form the phylum Euarthropoda,[1][3] which includes insects, arachnids, myriapods, and crustaceans. The term Arthropoda as originally proposed refers to a proposed grouping of Euarthropods and the phylum Onychophora. Arthropods are characterized by their jointed limbs and cuticle made of chitin, often mineralised with calcium carbonate. The arthropod body plan consists of segments, each with a pair of appendages. The rigid cuticle inhibits growth, so arthropods replace it periodically by moulting. Their versatility has enabled them to become the most species-rich members of all ecological guilds in most environments
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Hazelnut
The hazelnut is the nut of the hazel and therefore includes any of the nuts deriving from species of the genus Corylus, especially the nuts of the species Corylus avellana. It also is known as cobnut or filbert nut according to species.[1] A cob is roughly spherical to oval, about 15–25 mm (0.59–0.98 in) long and 10–15 mm (0.39–0.59 in) in diameter, with an outer fibrous husk surrounding a smooth shell. A filbert is more elongated, being about twice as long as its diameter. The nut falls out of the husk when ripe, about 7 to 8 months after pollination. The kernel of the seed is edible and used raw or roasted, or ground into a paste. The seed has a thin, dark brown skin, which sometimes is removed before cooking. Hazelnuts are used in confectionery to make praline, and also used in combination with chocolate for chocolate truffles and products such as Nutella
Nutella
and Frangelico
Frangelico
liqueur
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Acorn
The acorn, or oak nut, is the nut of the oaks and their close relatives (genera Quercus
Quercus
and Lithocarpus, in the family Fagaceae). It usually contains a single seed (occasionally two seeds), enclosed in a tough, leathery shell, and borne in a cup-shaped cupule. Acorns are 1–6 cm (0.39–2.36 in) long and 0.8–4 cm (0.31–1.57 in) broad
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