HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Chinese Pagoda
Chinese pagodas (Chinese: 塔; pinyin: Tǎ) are a traditional part of Chinese architecture. In addition to religious use, since ancient times Chinese pagodas have been praised for the spectacular views which they are built to offer, and many famous poems in Chinese history attest to the joy of scaling pagodas. The oldest and tallest were built of wood, but those which have endured over time have been built of brick or stone. Some pagodas were solid, and had no interior at all; others were hollow and held within themselves an altar, with the larger frequently containing a smaller pagoda (pagodas were not inhabited buildings and had no "floors" or "rooms"). The pagoda's interior has a series of staircases that allow the visitor to ascend to the top of the building and to witness the view from an opening on one side at each storey
[...More...]

"Chinese Pagoda" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Han Chinese
The Han Chinese, Han people[27][28][29] or simply Han[28][29][30] (/hɑːn/;[31] Mandarin: [xân]; Han characters: 漢人 (Mandarin pinyin: Hànrén; literally "Han people"[32]) or 漢族 (pinyin: Hànzú; literally "Han ethnicity"[33] or "Han ethnic group"[34])) are an East Asian ethnic group and nation.[35] They constitute the world's largest ethnic group, making up about 18% of the global population. The estimated 1.3 billion Han Chinese
Han Chinese
are mostly concentrated in Mainland China, where they make up about 92% of the total population.[2] The
[...More...]

"Han Chinese" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Du Mu
Du Mu
Du Mu
(Chinese: 杜牧; pinyin: Dù Mù; Wade–Giles: Tu4 Mu4; 803–852) was a leading Chinese poet of the late Tang dynasty. His courtesy name was Muzhi (牧之), and sobriquet Fanchuan (樊川).[1] He is best known for his lyrical and romantic quatrains.[2] Regarded as a major poet during a golden age of Chinese poetry, his name is often mentioned together with that of another renowned Late Tang poet, Li Shangyin, as the Little Li-Du (小李杜), in contrast to the Great Li-Du: Li Bai
Li Bai
and Du Fu. Among his influences were Du Fu, Li Bai, Han Yu
Han Yu
and Liu Zongyuan.Contents1 Biography 2 Works2.1 Poetry 2.2 Prose3 Modern references 4 See also 5 References 6 Works cited 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit] Du Mu
Du Mu
was born in the Tang capital Chang'an
Chang'an
(modern Xi'an) into an elite family whose fortunes were declining
[...More...]

"Du Mu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Xuzhou
Xuzhou, known as Pengcheng in ancient times, is a major city in Jiangsu
Jiangsu
province, China
[...More...]

"Xuzhou" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Eastern Han Dynasty
Coordinates: 34°09′21″N 108°56′47″E / 34.15583°N 108.94639°E / 34.15583; 108.94639Han dynasty漢朝206 BC–220 ADA map of the Western Han
Western Han
Dynasty in 2 AD: 1) the territory shaded in dark blue represents the principalities and centrally-administered commanderies of the Han Empire; 2) the light blue area shows the extent of the Tarim Basin
[...More...]

"Eastern Han Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Three Kingdoms
The Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
(AD 184/220–280) was the tripartite division of China
China
between the states of Wei (魏), Shu (蜀), and Wu (吳).[1] It started with the dissolution of the Han dynasty
Han dynasty
and was followed by the Jin dynasty. The term "Three Kingdoms" is something of a misnomer, since each state was eventually headed not by a king, but by an emperor who claimed suzerainty over all China.[2] Nevertheless, the term "Three Kingdoms" has become standard among sinologists
[...More...]

"Three Kingdoms" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fuzhou
Fuzhou, formerly romanized as Foochow, is the capital and one of the largest cities in Fujian
Fujian
province, China.[2] Along with the many counties of Ningde, those of Fuzhou
Fuzhou
are considered to constitute the Mindong
Mindong
(lit. Eastern Fujian) linguistic and cultural area. Fuzhou
Fuzhou
lies on the north (left) bank of the estuary of Fujian's largest river, the Min River. All along its northern border lies Ningde, and Ningde's Gutian County
Gutian County
lies upriver
[...More...]

"Fuzhou" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Civil Service
The civil service is independent of government and composed mainly of career bureaucrats hired on professional merit rather than appointed or elected, whose institutional tenure typically survives transitions of political leadership. A civil servant or public servant is a person employed in the public sector employed for a government department or agency. The extent of civil servants of a state as part of the "civil service" varies from country to country. In the United Kingdom, for instance, only Crown (national government) employees are referred to as civil servants whereas county or city employees are not. Many consider the study of service to be a part of the field of public administration
[...More...]

"Civil Service" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Imperial Examinations
The Chinese imperial examinations were a civil service examination system in Imperial China to select candidates for the state bureaucracy. Although there were imperial exams as early as the Han dynasty, the system became widely utilized as the major path to office only in the mid-Tang dynasty, and remained so until its abolition in 1905 . Since the exams were based on knowledge of the classics and literary style, not technical expertise, successful candidates were generalists who shared a common language and culture, one shared even by those who failed. This common culture helped to unify the empire and the ideal of achievement by merit gave legitimacy to imperial rule, while leaving clear problems resulting from a systemic lack of technical and practical expertise. The examination helped to shape China's intellectual, cultural, political, shopping, arts and crafts, and religious life
[...More...]

"Imperial Examinations" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Shakyamuni Buddha
Gautama Buddha[note 3] (c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE), also known as Siddhārtha Gautama,[note 4] Shakyamuni Buddha,[4][note 5] or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was an ascetic (śramaṇa) and sage,[4] on whose teachings Buddhism
Buddhism
was founded.[5] He is believed to have lived and taught mostly in the eastern part of ancient India sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE.[6][note 6] Gautama taught a Middle Way
Middle Way
between sensual indulgence and the severe asceticism found in the śramaṇa movement[7] common in his region. He later taught throughout other regions of eastern India
India
such as Magadha
Magadha
and Kosala.[6][8] Gautama is the primary figure in Buddhism
[...More...]

"Shakyamuni Buddha" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hangzhou
Hangzhou
Hangzhou
(Mandarin: [xǎŋ.ʈʂóu] ( listen); local dialect: /ɦɑŋ tseɪ/) formerly romanized as Hangchow, is the capital and most populous city of Zhejiang
Zhejiang
Province in east China.[2] It sits at the head of Hangzhou
Hangzhou
Bay, which separates Shanghai
Shanghai
and Ningbo. Hangzhou
Hangzhou
grew to prominence as the southern terminus of the Grand Canal and has been one of the most renowned and prosperous cities in China
China
for much of the last millennium
[...More...]

"Hangzhou" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Iconography
Iconography, as a branch of art history, studies the identification, description, and the interpretation of the content of images: the subjects depicted, the particular compositions and details used to do so, and other elements that are distinct from artistic style. The word iconography comes from the Greek εἰκών ("image") and γράφειν ("to write"). A secondary meaning (based on a non-standard translation of the Greek and Russian equivalent terms) is the production of religious images, called "icons", in the Byzantine and Orthodox Christian tradition; see Icon. In art history, "an iconography" may also mean a particular depiction of a subject in terms of the content of the image, such as the number of figures used, their placing and gestures. The term is also used in many academic fields other than art history, for example semiotics and media studies, and in general usage, for the content of images, the typical depiction in images of a subject, and related senses
[...More...]

"Iconography" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tang Dynasty
The Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
or the Tang Empire
Empire
(/tɑːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 唐朝[a]) was an imperial dynasty of China preceded by the Sui dynasty
Sui dynasty
and followed by the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. It is generally regarded as a high point in Chinese civilization, and a golden age of cosmopolitan culture.[5] Its territory, acquired through the military campaigns of its early rulers, rivaled that of the Han dynasty, and the Tang capital at Chang'an
Chang'an
(present-day Xi'an) was the most populous city in the world. The dynasty was founded by the Lǐ family (李), who seized power during the decline and collapse of the Sui Empire
[...More...]

"Tang Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Stories About Buddhist Temples In Luoyang
Yang Xuanzhi (Chinese: 楊衒之) was a Chinese writer and translator of Mahayana Buddhist texts into the Chinese language, during the 6th century, under the Northern Wei Dynasty. Yang wrote "The Monasteries of Luoyang" (Chinese: 洛陽伽藍記; pinyin: Luòyáng Qiélánjì; Wade–Giles: Luo-yang Chia-lan ji)[1] [2] in 547. This text relates the introduction of Buddhism to China around 70 CE:The establishment of the Baima Temple (Temple of the White Horse) by Emperor Ming (AD 58–75) of the Han marked the introduction of Buddhism into China. The temple was located on the south side of the Imperial Drive, three leagues (li) outside the Xiyang Gate. The Emperor dreamt of the golden man sixteen Chinese feet tall, with the aureole of sun and moon radiating from his head and his neck. A "golden god", he was known as Buddha. The emperor dispatched envoys to the Western Regions in search of the god, and, as a result, acquired Buddhist scriptures and images
[...More...]

"Stories About Buddhist Temples In Luoyang" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Changzhou
213000, 213100 (Urban center) 213200, 213300 (Other areas)Area code(s) 0519GDP 2016[1] - Total CNY 577.39 billion (USD 87.05 billion) - per capita CNY 122701 (USD 18,500.00) - Growth 8.5%License Plate Prefix 苏DLocal dialect Wu: Changzhou
Changzhou
dialectWebsite www.changzhou.gov.cnChangzhou"Changzhou" in ChineseChinese 常州TranscriptionsStandard MandarinHanyu Pinyin ChángzhōuGwoyeu Romatzyh CharngjouWade–Giles Ch'ang2-chou1IPA [ʈʂʰǎŋʈʂóu]WuRomanization Zaontsei Changzhou
Changzhou
is a prefecture-level city in southern Jiangsu
Jiangsu
province of China. It was previously known as Yanling, Lanling, Jinling, and Wujin
[...More...]

"Changzhou" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Northern Wei Dynasty
The Northern Wei
Northern Wei
or the Northern Wei
Northern Wei
Empire (/weɪ/),[7] also known as the Tuoba
Tuoba
Wei (拓跋魏), Later Wei (後魏), or Yuan Wei (元魏), was a dynasty founded by the Tuoba
Tuoba
clan of the Xianbei, which ruled northern China from 386 to 534[8] (de jure until 535), during the period of the Southern and Northern Dynasties
[...More...]

"Northern Wei Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.