HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Chimán Language
Chimané (Tsimané) is a South American language isolate. Some dialects are known as Mosetén (Mosetén of Santa Ana, Mosetén of Covendo). Chimane is a language of the western Bolivian lowlands spoken by the Tsimane peoples along the Beni River
Beni River
and the region around San Borja in the Department of Beni (Bolivia). Sakel (2004) [3] classifies them as two languages for a number of reasons, yet some of the variants of the language are mutually intelligible and they reportedly have no trouble communicating ( Ethnologue
Ethnologue
16) and were evidently a single language separated recently through cultural contact (Campbell 2000).Contents1 Classification 2 Writing system 3 References 4 External linksClassification[edit] Mosetenan has no obvious relatives among the languages of South America. There is some lexicon shared with Puquina and the Uru–Chipaya languages, but these appear to be borrowings
[...More...]

"Chimán Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Leco Language
Leco, also written as Leko, is a language isolate that, though long reported to be extinct, is spoken by 20–40 individuals in areas east of Lake Titicaca, Bolivia. The Leco ethnic population is about 80.Contents1 Historical, social, and cultural aspects1.1 History 1.2 Use and description2 Linguistic description2.1 Phonology 2.2 Lexicon and classes of words 2.3 Morphology 2.4 Speech3 References 4 External linksHistorical, social, and cultural aspects[edit] History[edit] Apart from some brief lists of vocabulary, the main document for which Leco is known is a Christian doctrine compiled by the missionary Andrés Herrero at the beginning of the 19th century. That doctrine was published in 1905 by Lafone Quevedo, who used it as a source to make a grammatical description of the language
[...More...]

"Leco Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tupian Languages
The Tupi or Tupian language family comprises some 70 languages spoken in South America, of which the best known are Tupi proper and Guarani.Contents1 Homeland and urheimat 2 History, members and classification 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksHomeland and urheimat[edit] Rodrigues (2007) considers the Proto-Tupian urheimat to be somewhere between the Guaporé and Aripuanã
Aripuanã
rivers, in the Madeira River basin.[2] Much of this area corresponds to the modern-day state of Rondônia, Brazil. 5 of the 10 Tupian branches are found in this area, as well as some Tupi–Guarani languages
Tupi–Guarani languages
(especially Kawahíb), making it the probable urheimat of these languages and maybe of its speaking peoples
[...More...]

"Tupian Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Chakobo Language
Chácobo-Pakawara is a Panoan language spoken by about 550 of 860 ethnic tribal Chácobo people of the Beni Department
Beni Department
of northwest of Magdalena, Bolivia, and (as of 2004) 17 of 50 Pakawara. Chácobo children are learning the language as a first language, but Pakawara is moribund.[6] Extinct Karipuna may have been a dialect; alternative names are Jaunavô (Jau-Navo) and Éloe.[7] Several extinct and unattested languages were reported to have been related, perhaps dialects. These include Capuibo and Sinabo/Shinabo of the Mamoré River
[...More...]

"Chakobo Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ese Ejja Language
Language
Language
is a system that consists of the development, acquisition, maintenance and use of complex systems of communication, particularly the human ability to do so; and a language is any specific example of such a system. The scientific study of language is called linguistics. Questions concerning the philosophy of language, such as whether words can represent experience, have been debated at least since Gorgias
Gorgias
and Plato
Plato
in ancient Greece. Thinkers such as Rousseau
Rousseau
have argued that language originated from emotions while others like Kant have held that it originated from rational and logical thought. 20th-century philosophers such as Wittgenstein argued that philosophy is really the study of language. Major figures in linguistics include Ferdinand de Saussure and Noam Chomsky. Estimates of the number of human languages in the world vary between 5,000 and 7,000
[...More...]

"Ese Ejja Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Reyesano Language
Reyesano, or Chirigua (Chiriba), is a nearly extinct Tacanan language that was spoken by only a few speakers, including children, in 1961 in Bolivia. There still are adult speakers in the largely indigenous community of El Cozar in Reyes. However, it is doubtful that this language will survive much into the 21st century. Such is the margination of the indigenous people in the Beni that very little Reyesano words have entered the popular criollo Spanish, very unlike the situation in Quechua and Aymara influenced areas. There are many indigenous terms in "camba" (Spanish of the Beni) but they mostly of Guaraní origin carried to the Beni by the original settlers from Santa Cruz.[citation needed] Evidently the name Reyesano comes from the name of the town of Reyes, of the Province of Ballivián in the Department of the Beni in the plains adjacent to the Bolivian Amazon
[...More...]

"Reyesano Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Tacana Language
Tacana is a Western Tacanan language spoken by some 1,800 Tacana people in Bolivia
Bolivia
out of an ethnic population of 5,000. They live in the forest along the Beni and Madre de Dios rivers. Numerous dialects, now extinct, have been attributed to Tacana: Ayaychuna, Babayana, Chiliuvo, Chivamona, Idiama (Ixiama), Pamaino, Pasaramona, Saparuna, Siliama, Tumupasa (Maracani, "Tupamasa"), Uchupiamona, Yabaypura, and Yubamona (Mason 1950). External links[edit]^ a b Tacana at Ethnologue
Ethnologue
(18th ed., 2015) ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Tacana". Glottolog
Glottolog
3.0
[...More...]

"Tacana Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Toromono Language
Toromono (Toromona) is a Western Tacanan language. 200 Toromono were reported in 1983, but they have not been located since.[citation needed] External links[edit]^ Toromono at Ethnologue
Ethnologue
(18th ed., 2015) ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Toromono". Glottolog
Glottolog
3.0
[...More...]

"Toromono Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Yaminawa Language
Yaminawa (Yaminahua) is a Panoan language
Panoan language
of western Amazonia. It is spoken by the Yaminawá
Yaminawá
and some related peoples. Yaminawa constitutes an extensive dialect cluster
[...More...]

"Yaminawa Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Quechuan Languages
Quechua (/ˈkɛtʃuə/, in AmE also /ˈkɛtʃwɑː/)[2], known as Runasimi ("people's language") in the Quechuan language, is an indigenous language family, with variations spoken by the Quechua peoples, primarily living in the Andes
Andes
and highlands of South America.[3] Derived from a common ancestral language, it is the most widely spoken language family of indigenous peoples of the Americas, with a total of probably some 8–10 million speakers.[4] Approximately 25% (7.7 million) of Peruvians speak some variation of Quechua.[5][6] It is perhaps most widely known for being the main language of the Inca Empire. The colonisers initially encouraged its use, but from the middle of their reign they suppressed it
[...More...]

"Quechuan Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Cusco–Collao Quechua
Cusco–Collao (Spanish, also Cuzco–Collao) or Qusqu–Qullaw (Quechua) is a collective term used for Quechua dialects that have aspirated (tʃʰ, pʰ, tʰ, kʰ, qʰ) and ejective (tʃʼ, pʼ, tʼ, kʼ, qʼ) plosives, apparently borrowed from Aymaran languages. They include Cusco Quechua, Puno Quechua, North Bolivian Quechua, and South Bolivian Quechua. Together with Ayacucho Quechua, which is mutually intelligible, they form the Southern Quechua
Southern Quechua
language. In 1975, the term "Cusco-Collao" was coined by the government of Juan Velasco Alvarado as the name of one of six officially recognized regional varieties of Quechua in Peru, and is still used in both Spanish and Quechua forms in publications of the Peruvian government[4] and SIL International.[5] In linguistic terms, the group is problematic
[...More...]

"Cusco–Collao Quechua" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

North Bolivian Quechua
North Bolivian Quechua is a dialect of the Southern Quechua
Southern Quechua
language, spoken in northern Bolivia
Bolivia
on the Peruvian border, as well as by immigrants in Peru. References[edit]^ North Bolivian Quechua at Ethnologue
Ethnologue
(18th ed., 2015) ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "North Bolivian Quechua". Glottolog
Glottolog
3.0
[...More...]

"North Bolivian Quechua" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

South Bolivian Quechua
1,616,120 (2004-20 4)[1]Language familyQuechuanQuechua IISouthern QuechuaSouth Bolivian QuechuaLanguage codesISO 639-3 quhGlottolog sout2991[2]The four branches of Quechua. South Bolivian Quechua
South Bolivian Quechua
is a dialect of Southern Quechua
Southern Quechua
(II-C).South Bolivian Quechua, also known as Central Bolivian Quechua, is a dialect of Southern Quechua
Southern Quechua
spoken in Bolivia
Bolivia
and adjacent areas of Argentina, where it is also known as Colla. It is not to be confused with North Bolivian Quechua, which is spoken on the northern Andean slopes of Bolivia
Bolivia
and is phonologically distinct from the South Bolivian variety
[...More...]

"South Bolivian Quechua" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Guarani Language
Guarani (/ˈɡwɑːrəniː/ or /ɡwærəˈniː/),[3] specifically the primary variety known as Paraguayan Guarani (endonym avañe'ẽ [aʋãɲẽˈʔẽ] 'the people's language'), is an indigenous language of South America
South America
that belongs to the Tupi–Guarani
Tupi–Guarani
family[4] of the Tupian languages
[...More...]

"Guarani Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Araona Language
Araona or Cavina is an indigenous language spoken by the South America Araona people; about 90% of the 90 Araona people are fluent (W. Adelaar). Use of the language amongst the tribe is considered vigorous although Spanish knowledge is increasing. The Araonans live in the headwaters of the Manupari river in northwest Bolivia. Their language has a dictionary and portions of the Bible
Bible
have been translated into Araona. Capachene and Machui are dialects of either Araona or of Cavineña.Contents1 History 2 Phonology 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The Araona people and their language were long ignored in the written, European-based historical traditions, long after the Conquest of the Americas and what is now Bolivia
[...More...]

"Araona Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Eastern Bolivian Guaraní
The Eastern Bolivian Guaraní, or Ava Guaraní, are an Indigenous people formerly known as Chiriguanos or Chiriguano Indians. Noted for their warlike character, the Chiriguanos retained their lands in the Andes foothills of southeastern Bolivia
Bolivia
from the 16th to the 19th centuries by fending off, first, the Inca Empire, later, the Spanish Empire, and, still later, independent Bolivia. The Chiriguanos were finally subjugated in 1892. The Chiriguanos of history nearly disappeared from public consciousness after their 1892 defeat -- but were reborn beginning in the 1970s
[...More...]

"Eastern Bolivian Guaraní" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.