HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Chilean Wine Palm
Jubaea
Jubaea
is a genus of palms (family Arecaceae) with one species, Jubaea chilensis, or J. spectabilis, the Chilean wine palm or Chile cocopalm. It is native to southwestern South America, where it is endemic to a small area of central Chile, between 32°S and 35°S in southern Coquimbo, Valparaíso, Santiago, O'Higgins and northern Maule regions. It was long assumed that the extinct palm tree of Easter Island belonged to this genus too, but it is distinct and now placed in its own genus, Paschalococos.Contents1 Etymology 2 Growth 3 Ecology 4 Ornamental use and artificial cultivation 5 Economic uses 6 Conservation 7 Gallery 8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 External linksEtymology[edit] The genus was named after Juba II, a Berber king and botanist. Growth[edit] The tree grows very slowly, as it is usual for palm trees. It takes several years until the Jubaea
Jubaea
starts getting its weight and size
[...More...]

"Chilean Wine Palm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Conservation Status
The conservation status of a group of organisms (for instance, a species) indicates whether the group still exists and how likely the group is to become extinct in the near future
[...More...]

"Conservation Status" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Human Overpopulation
Human overpopulation
Human overpopulation
(or population overshoot) occurs when the ecological footprint of a human population in a specific geographical location exceeds the carrying capacity of the place occupied by that group. Overpopulation can further be viewed, in a long term perspective, as existing if a population cannot be maintained given the rapid depletion of non-renewable resources or given the degradation of the quality of the environment to give support to the population. Changes in lifestyle could reverse overpopulated status without a large population reduction.[1][2][3] The term human overpopulation refers to the relationship between the entire human population and its environment: the Earth,[4] or to smaller geographical areas such as countries. Overpopulation can result from an increase in births, a decline in mortality rates, an increase in immigration, or an unsustainable biome and depletion of resources
[...More...]

"Human Overpopulation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Juba II
Juba II
Juba II
(Berber: Yuba, ⵢⵓⴱⴰ; Latin: IVBA, Juba; Ancient Greek: Ἰóβας, Ἰóβα or Ἰούβας)[1] or Juba II
Juba II
of Mauretania (52/50 BC – AD 23) was a Berber King of Mauretania. His first wife was Cleopatra Selene II, daughter of the Greek Ptolemaic Queen Cleopatra VII
Cleopatra VII
of Egypt and Roman triumvir Mark Antony.Contents1 Early life 2 Restored to the throne 3 Mauretania 4 Marriages and children 5 Author5.1 Natural history6 In fiction 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Juba II
Juba II
was a Berber prince from Africa Proconsulare. He was the only child and heir of King Juba I
Juba I
of Numidia; his mother's identity is unknown. In 46 BC, his father was defeated by Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
(in Thapsus, North Africa)
[...More...]

"Juba II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Berber People
Berbers
Berbers
or Amazighs (Berber languages: ⵉⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵏ Imaziɣen; singular: ⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖ Amaziɣ / Amazigh) are an ethnic group indigenous to North Africa, primarily inhabiting the Maghreb. They are distributed in an area stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to the Siwa Oasis
Siwa Oasis
in Egypt, and from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the Niger
Niger
River in West Africa. Historically, they spoke Berber languages, which together form the Berber branch of the Afroasiatic family. Since the Muslim conquest
Muslim conquest
of North Africa
North Africa
in the seventh century, a large number of Berbers
Berbers
inhabiting the Maghreb
Maghreb
(Tamazgha) have in varying degrees used as lingua franca the other languages spoken in North Africa
[...More...]

"Berber People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Leaf
A leaf is an organ of a vascular plant and is the principal lateral appendage of the stem.[1] The leaves and stem together form the shoot.[2] Leaves are collectively referred to as foliage, as in "autumn foliage".[3][4]Diagram of a simple leaf.Apex Midvein (Primary vein) Secondary vein. Lamina. Leaf
Leaf
margin Petiole Bud StemAlthough leaves can be seen in many different shapes, sizes and textures, typically a leaf is a thin, dorsiventrally flattened organ, borne above ground and specialized for photosynthesis. In most leaves, the primary photosynthetic tissue, the palisade mesophyll, is located on the upper side of the blade or lamina of the leaf[1] but in some species, including the mature foliage of Eucalyptus,[5] palisade mesophyll is present on both sides and the leaves are said to be isobilateral
[...More...]

"Leaf" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Kew
(brand name Kew) is a non-departmental public body in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
sponsored by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. An internationally important botanical research and education institution, it employs 723 staff (FTE).[1] Its board of trustees is chaired by Marcus Agius,[1] a former chairman of Barclays. The organisation manages botanic gardens at Kew
Kew
in Richmond upon Thames in southwest London, and at Wakehurst Place, a National Trust property in Sussex
Sussex
which is home to an internationally important Millennium Seed Bank, whose scientists work with partner organisations in more than 95 countries.[3] Seed stored at the bank fulfils two functions: it provides an ex-situ conservation resource and also facilitates research around the globe by acting as a repository for seed scientists
[...More...]

"Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Borassus Aethiopum
Borassus aethiopum is a species of Borassus palm from Africa. In English it is variously referred to as African fan palm, African palmyra palm, deleb palm, ron palm, toddy palm, black rhun palm, ronier palm (from the French). It is widespread across much of tropical Africa from Senegal to Ethiopia and south to northern South Africa, though it is largely absent from the forested areas of Central Africa and desert regions such as the Sahara and Namib. This palm also grows in northwest Madagascar and the Comoros.[2][3]Contents1 Description 2 Uses 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] The typical form of Borassus aethiopum is a solitary palm to 25 metres (82 ft) in height and 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) in diameter at the base
[...More...]

"Borassus Aethiopum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Coquito Nuts
Coquito nuts are the fruits from a feather-leaved palm, Jubaea chilensis, native to Chile, having a thick trunk from which is obtained a sugary sap used for making wine and a syrup, and widely cultivated as an ornamental in warm dry regions.[1] (Spanish, diminutive of coco, "coco palm", from Portuguese côco; see coconut.) Coquito nuts look like miniature coconuts and have a very similar flavor to coconuts. They have a brown exterior and a white interior with a hollow center. They measure about 1⁄2 to 3⁄4 inch (1.3 to 1.9 cm) in diameter. They are completely edible (raw or cooked), and are crunchy, with an almond-like sweetness.[2]Contents1 History 2 Usage 3 Nutritional information 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Coquito nuts, also referred to as coker nuts, pygmy coconuts or monkey's coconut, are the fruit of a Chilean palm tree. The tree, Jubaea chilensis, takes up to fifty years to achieve maturity, and is native to the coastal valleys of Chile
[...More...]

"Coquito Nuts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fermented Beverage
An alcoholic drink, or alcoholic beverage, is a drink that contains alcohol (ethanol), a depressant which in low doses causes euphoria, reduced anxiety, and sociability and in higher doses causes drunkenness, stupor and unconsciousness. Long-term use can lead to alcohol abuse, physical dependence, and alcoholism. Drinking alcohol plays an important social role in many cultures. Most countries have laws regulating the production, sale, and consumption of alcoholic beverages.[1] Some countries ban such activities entirely, but alcoholic drinks are legal in most parts of the world. The global alcoholic drink industry exceeded $1 trillion in 2014.[2] Alcohol
Alcohol
is one of the most widely used recreational drugs in the world
[...More...]

"Fermented Beverage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fruit
In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) formed from the ovary after flowering. Fruits are the means by which angiosperms disseminate seeds. Edible fruits, in particular, have propagated with the movements of humans and animals in a symbiotic relationship as a means for seed dispersal and nutrition; in fact, humans and many animals have become dependent on fruits as a source of food.[1] Accordingly, fruits account for a substantial fraction of the world's agricultural output, and some (such as the apple and the pomegranate) have acquired extensive cultural and symbolic meanings. In common language usage, "fruit" normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures of a plant that are sweet or sour, and edible in the raw state, such as apples, bananas, grapes, lemons, oranges, and strawberries
[...More...]

"Fruit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Leverkusen
Leverkusen
Leverkusen
(/ˈleɪvərˌkuːzən/; German pronunciation: [ˈleːvɐˌkuːzn̩] ( listen)) is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
Germany
on the eastern bank of the Rhine. To the South, Leverkusen
Leverkusen
borders the city of Cologne
Cologne
and to the North is the state capital Düsseldorf. With about 161,000 inhabitants, Leverkusen
Leverkusen
is one of the state's smaller cities. The city is known for the pharmaceutical company Bayer and its associated sports club Bayer
Bayer
04 Leverkusen.Contents1 History 2 Main sights and places of interest 3 Sports 4 International relations 5 Notable people 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksHistory[edit] The heart of what is now Leverkusen
Leverkusen
was a village called Wiesdorf, which dates back to the 12th century
[...More...]

"Leverkusen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Extinct
In biology and ecology, extinction is the termination of an organism or of a group of organisms (taxon), normally a species. The moment of extinction is generally considered to be the death of the last individual of the species, although the capacity to breed and recover may have been lost before this point. Because a species' potential range may be very large, determining this moment is difficult, and is usually done retrospectively
[...More...]

"Extinct" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Goleta, California
Goleta (/ɡəˈliːtə/; Spanish: [ɡoˈleta], "schooner"[13]) is a city in southern Santa Barbara County, California, US. It was incorporated as a city in 2002, after a long period as the largest unincorporated, populated area in the county. As of the 2000 census, the Census-designated place (CDP) had a total population of 55,204, however, a significant portion of the census territory of 2000 did not incorporate into the new city
[...More...]

"Goleta, California" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Union For Conservation Of Nature
The International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN; officially International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
and Natural Resources[2]) is an international organization working in the field of nature conservation and sustainable use of natural resources. It is involved in data gathering and analysis, research, field projects, advocacy, and education. IUCN's mission is to "influence, encourage and assist societies throughout the world to conserve nature and to ensure that any use of natural resources is equitable and ecologically sustainable". Over the past decades, IUCN has widened its focus beyond conservation ecology and now incorporates issues related to sustainable development in its projects. Unlike many other international environmental organisations, IUCN does not itself aim to mobilize the public in support of nature conservation
[...More...]

"International Union For Conservation Of Nature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wikidata
Wikidata
Wikidata
is a collaboratively edited knowledge base hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. It is intended to provide a common source of data which can be used by Wikimedia projects such as,[4][5] and by anyone else, under a public domain license. This is similar to the way Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
provides storage for media files and access to those files for all Wikimedia projects, and which are also freely available for reuse. Wikidata
Wikidata
is powered by the software Wikibase.[6]Contents1 Concepts 2 Development history2.1 Phase 1 2.2 Phase 2 2.3 Phase 33 Reception 4 Logo 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksConcepts[edit]ScreenshotsThree statements from Wikidata's item on the planet Mars
[...More...]

"Wikidata" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.