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Childeric II
CHILDERIC II (c. 653 – 675) was the king of Austrasia
Austrasia
from 662 and of Neustria
Neustria
and Burgundy from 673 until his death, making him sole King of the Franks
King of the Franks
for the final two years of his life. Childeric was the second eldest son of King Clovis II
Clovis II
and grandson of King Dagobert I
Dagobert I
and Queen Nanthild . His mother was Saint Balthild and his elder brother was Chlothar III
Chlothar III
, who was briefly sole king from 661, but gave Austrasia
Austrasia
to Childeric the next year. He was still a mere child when he was raised on the shields of his warriors and proclaimed king in Austrasia
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Lognes
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting : residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. LOGNES is a commune in the eastern suburbs of Paris
Paris
, France
France
. It is located in the Seine-et-Marne
Seine-et-Marne
department in the Île-de- France
France
20.7 km (12.9 mi) from the center of Paris
Paris
. The commune of Lognes
Lognes
is part of the Val Maubuée sector, one of the four sectors in the "new town " of Marne-la-Vallée
Marne-la-Vallée
. CONTENTS* 1 Demographics * 1.1 Ethnicities * 2 Transportation * 3 Education * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links DEMOGRAPHICSThe inhabitants are called the Lognots
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Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting : residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. PARIS (French pronunciation: ​ ( listen )) is the capital and most populous city in France
France
, with an administrative-limits area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and an official population of 2,206,488 (2015). The city is a commune and department , and the heart of the 12,012-square-kilometre (4,638-square-mile) Île-de- France
France
region (colloquially known as the ' Paris
Paris
Region'), whose 2016 population of 12,142,802 represented roughly 18 percent of the population of France. Since the 17th century, Paris
Paris
has been one of Europe's major centres of finance, commerce, fashion, science, and the arts
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Dux
DUX (/dʌks, dʊks/ ; plural: duces) is Latin
Latin
for "leader" (from the noun dux, ducis, "leader, general") and later for duke and its variant forms (doge , duce , etc.). During the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
, dux could refer to anyone who commanded troops, including foreign leaders, but was not a formal military rank. In writing his commentaries on the Gallic Wars , Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
uses the term only for Celtic generals, with one exception for a Roman commander who held no official rank. CONTENTS* 1 Roman Empire
Roman Empire
* 1.1 Original usage * 1.2 Change in usage * 1.3 The office under the Dominate * 2 Later developments * 3 Post-Roman uses * 3.1 Education * 4 See also * 5 Notes * 6 References * 7 Sources * 8 External links ROMAN EMPIRE This section NEEDS ADDITIONAL CITATIONS FOR VERIFICATION
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Alsace
ALSACE (/ælˈsæs, -ˈseɪs, ˈælsæs, -seɪs/ , French: ( listen ); Alsatian : ’s Elsass ; German: Elsass ( listen ); Latin
Latin
: Alsatia) is a cultural and historical region in eastern France now located in the administrative region of Grand Est . Alsace
Alsace
is located on France's eastern border and on the west bank of the upper Rhine
Rhine
adjacent to Germany
Germany
and Switzerland
Switzerland

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Nanthild
NANTHILD (c. 610 – 642), also known as Nantéchilde, Nanthechilde, Nanthildis, Nanthilde, or Nantechildis, was a Frankish queen consort and regent, the third of many consorts of Dagobert I
Dagobert I
, king of the Franks (629–639). She was regent during the minority of her son from 639 until 642. LIFEShe was of Saxon lineage, born about 608 or 610. The Lexikon des Mittelalters calls her ein Mädchen aus dem Dienstpersonal ("a maiden of the royal household"). Her elevation to consort may have given importance to her relatives: her brother Lanthegisel was an important landowner in the Limousin and a relation of Aldegisel. Dagobert set aside his wife Gomatrud to marry her, ca. 629; to her was born Clovis II , second eldest of Dagobert's surviving sons and the one who succeeded him in Neustria
Neustria
and Burgundy
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Cousin Marriage
COUSIN MARRIAGE is marriage between cousins (i.e. people with common grandparents or people who share other fairly recent ancestors). Opinions and practice vary widely across the world. In some cultures and communities, cousin marriage is considered ideal and actively encouraged; in others, it is subject to social stigma . Cousin marriage is common in the Middle East
Middle East
, for instance, where it accounts for over half of all marriages in some countries. In some countries outside that region, it is uncommon but still legal. In others, it is seen as incestuous and is legally prohibited : it is banned in China
China
and Taiwan
Taiwan
, North Korea
North Korea
, South Korea
South Korea
, and in fewer than half of the United States
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International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
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Theudebert II
THEUDEBERT II (French : Thibert or Théodebert) (586-612), King of Austrasia
Austrasia
(595–612 AD ), was the son and heir of Childebert II
Childebert II
. He received the kingdom of Austrasia
Austrasia
plus the cities (civitates) of Poitiers
Poitiers
, Tours
Tours
, Le Puy-en-Velay
Le Puy-en-Velay
, Bordeaux
Bordeaux
, and Châteaudun , as well as the Champagne , the Auvergne , and Transjurane Alemannia . He succeeded his grandmother Brunhilda
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The ENCYCLOPæDIA BRITANNICA ELEVENTH EDITION (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia is now in the public domain , but the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic. Some articles have special value and interest to modern scholars as cultural artifacts of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Tens of thousands of its articles were copied directly into , where they still can be found
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Public Domain
The legal term PUBLIC DOMAIN refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired, have been forfeited, have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable. For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven , and most of the early silent films , are all now in the public domain by either being created before copyrights existed or by their copyright term expiring. Examples for works not covered by copyright which are therefore in the public domain, are the formulae of Newtonian physics , cooking recipes , and all software before 1974. Examples for works actively dedicated into public domain by their authors are reference implementations of cryptographic algorithms , NIH 's ImageJ , and the CIA
CIA
's World Factbook
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Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
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Kingdom Of Burgundy
KINGDOM OF BURGUNDY was a name given to various states located in Western Europe
Western Europe
during the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
. The historical Burgundy correlates with the border area of France
France
, Italy
Italy
and Switzerland
Switzerland
and includes the major modern cities of Geneva
Geneva
and Lyon
Lyon
. As a political entity, Burgundy has existed in a number of forms with different boundaries, notably, when divided in Upper and Lower Burgundy and Provence. Two of these entities — the first around the 6th century, the second around the 11th century — have been called the Kingdom of Burgundy. At other times there existed Kingdom of Provence
Provence
, Duchy of Burgundy and County of Burgundy
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Fee (feudal Tenure)
A FIEF (/ˈfiːf/ ; Latin : feudum) was the central element of feudalism and consisted of heritable property or rights granted by an overlord to a vassal who held it in fealty (or "in fee") in return for a form of feudal allegiance and service, usually given by the personal ceremonies of homage and fealty. The fees were often lands or revenue-producing real property held in feudal land tenure : these are typically known as FIEFS or FIEFDOMS. However, not only land but anything of value could be held in fee, including governmental office, rights of exploitation such as hunting or fishing, monopolies in trade, and tax farms
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Saint-Germain-des-Prés
SAINT-GERMAIN-DES-PRéS (French pronunciation: ​ ) is one of the four administrative quarters of the 6th arrondissement of Paris
Paris
, France, located around the church of the former Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés
Saint-Germain-des-Prés
. Its official borders are the River Seine
Seine
on the north, the rue des Saints-Pères on the west, between the rue de Seine
Seine
and rue Mazarine on the east, and the rue du Four on the south. Residents of the quarter are known as Germanopratins. The quarter has several famous cafés, including Les Deux Magots , Café de Flore , le Procope , and the Brasserie Lipp
Brasserie Lipp
, and a large number of bookstores and publishing houses
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Dynasty
A DYNASTY (UK : /ˈdɪnəsti/ , US : /ˈdaɪnəsti/ ) is a sequence of rulers from the same family, usually in the context of a feudal or monarchical system, but sometimes also appearing in elective republics . The dynastic family or lineage may be known as a "house ", which may be styled as "royal ", "princely ", "ducal ", "comital ", etc., depending upon the chief or present title borne by its members. Historians periodize the histories of many sovereign states , such as Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt
, the Carolingian Empire and Imperial China , using a framework of successive dynasties. As such, the term "dynasty" may be used to delimit the era during which the family reigned and to describe events, trends, and artifacts of that period ("a Ming-dynasty vase"). The word "dynasty" itself is often dropped from such adjectival references ("a Ming vase ")
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