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Childebert I
Childebert I
Childebert I
(c. 496 – 13 December 558) was a Frankish King
King
of the Merovingian
Merovingian
dynasty, as third of the four sons of Clovis I
Clovis I
who shared the kingdom of the Franks
Franks
upon their father's death in 511. He was one of the sons of Saint Clotilda, born at Reims. He reigned as King
King
of Paris
Paris
from 511 to 558 and Orléans
Orléans
from 524 to 558.Contents1 Biography 2 Ancestry 3 Notes 4 SourcesBiography[edit]The division of the lands of Gaul to the sons of Clovis I
Clovis I
upon his death in 511.In the partition of the realm, Childebert received as his share the town of Paris, the country to the north as far as the river Somme, to the west as far as the English Channel, and the Armorican peninsula (modern Brittany)
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Necropolis
A necropolis (pl. necropoleis) is a large, designed cemetery with elaborate tomb monuments. The name stems from the Ancient Greek νεκρόπολις nekropolis, literally meaning "city of the dead". The term usually implies a separate burial site at a distance from a city, as opposed to tombs within cities, which were common in various places and periods of history. They are different from grave fields, which did not have remains above the ground. While the word is most commonly used for ancient sites, the name was revived in the early 19th century and applied to planned city cemeteries, such as the Glasgow Necropolis. History[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
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Somme (river)
The Somme is a river in Picardy, northern France. The name Somme comes from a Celtic word meaning "tranquility". The department Somme was named after this river. The river is 245 km (152 mi) long, from its source in the high ground of the former Forest of Arrouaise at Fonsommes
Fonsommes
near Saint-Quentin, to the Bay of the Somme, in the English Channel. It lies in the geological syncline which also forms the Solent
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Geneva
Geneva
Geneva
(/dʒɪˈniːvə/, French: Genève [ʒənɛv], Arpitan: Genèva [dzəˈnɛva], German: Genf [ɡɛnf], Italian: Ginevra [dʒiˈneːvra], Romansh: Genevra) is the second-most populous city in Switzerland
Switzerland
(after Zürich) and is the most populous city of the Romandy, the French-speaking part of Switzerland
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Mâcon
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Mâcon
Mâcon
(French pronunciation: ​[ma.kɔ̃]), historically anglicized as Mascon, is a small city in east-central France. It is the prefecture of the department of Saône-et-Loire
Saône-et-Loire
in Bourgogne-Franche-Comté
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Ostrogoths
The Ostrogoths
Ostrogoths
(Latin: Ostrogothi, Austrogothi) were the eastern branch of the later Goths
Goths
(the other major branch being the Visigoths). The Ostrogoths
Ostrogoths
traced their origins to the Greutungi
Greutungi
– a branch of the Goths
Goths
who had migrated southward from the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
and established a kingdom north of the Black Sea, during the 3rd and 4th centuries. They built an empire stretching from the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the Baltic. The Ostrogoths
Ostrogoths
were probably literate in the 3rd century, and their trade with the Romans was highly developed
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Provence
Provence
Provence
(/prəˈvɒns/; French pronunciation: ​[pʁɔ.vɑ̃s]; Provençal: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm, pronounced [pʀuˈvɛⁿsɔ]) is a geographical region and historical province of southeastern France, which extends from the left bank of the lower Rhône
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Burgundians
The Burgundians
Burgundians
(Latin: Burgundiōnes, Burgundī; Old Norse: Burgundar; Old English: Burgendas; Greek: Βούργουνδοι) were a large East Germanic or Vandal
Vandal
tribe, or group of tribes, who lived in the area of modern Poland
Poland
in the time of the Roman Empire. In the late Roman period, as the empire came under pressure from many such "barbarian" peoples, a powerful group of Burgundians
Burgundians
and other Vandalic
Vandalic
tribes moved westwards towards the Roman frontiers along the Rhine
Rhine
Valley, making them neighbors of the Franks
Franks
who formed their kingdoms to the north, and the Suebic Alemanni
Alemanni
who were settling to their south, also near the Rhine
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Chartres
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Chartres
Chartres
(French pronunciation: ​[ʃaʁtʁ]) is a commune and capital of the Eure-et-Loir
Eure-et-Loir
department in France. It is located 96 km (60 mi) southwest of Paris
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Clodoald
Saint Clodoald
Clodoald
(Latin: Clodoaldus, Cloudus ;522 – c. 560 AD), better known as Cloud, was the son of King Chlodomer
Chlodomer
of Orléans and his wife Guntheuc. Life[edit] Clodoald
Clodoald
was raised in Paris by his grandmother, Saint Clotilde. He was one of three brothers, all of whom were targeted for assassination by their uncle, Clotaire I. Clodoald's brothers, Theodoald and Gunther, were killed by Clotaire when they were ten and nine respectively, but Clodoald
Clodoald
survived by escaping to Provence.[2] Clodoald
Clodoald
renounced all claims to the throne, and lived as a studious hermit and disciple of Saint Severinus of Noricum.[1] Visited by many for counsel and healing, Clodoald
Clodoald
in effect gained nothing by keeping himself remote from society. He therefore returned to Paris, where he was received with joy
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Arles
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Arles
Arles
(French pronunciation: ​[aʁl]; Provençal Arle [ˈaʀle] in both classical and Mistralian
Mistralian
norms; Arelate in Classical Latin) is a city and commune in the south of France, in the Bouches-du-Rhône department, of which it is a subprefecture, in the former province of Provence. A large part of the Camargue
Camargue
is located on the territory of the commune, making it the largest commune in Metropolitan France
France
in terms of territory (though Maripasoula, French Guiana, is much larger)
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Soissons
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Soissons
Soissons
(French pronunciation: ​[swasɔ̃]) is a commune in the northern French department of Aisne, in the region of Hauts-de-France
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Metz
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Part of the series onLorraineFlag of Lorraine
Lorraine
since the 13th centuryHistory
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Theuderic I
Theodoric is a Germanic given name. First attested as a Gothic name in the 5th century, it became widespread in the Germanic-speaking world, not least due to its most famous bearer, Theoderic the Great, king of the Ostrogoths. The name was Latinized as Theodoricus or Theodericus, originally from a Common Germanic
Common Germanic
form *þeudo-rīks ("people-ruler"), which would have resulted in a Gothic þiuda-reiks.[1] Anglicized spellings of the name during Late Antiquity
Late Antiquity
and the Early Middle Ages include Theodoric, Theoderic, Theudoric, Theuderic. Gregory of Tours Latinized the name as Theodorus, in origin the unrelated Greek name Theodore (Θεόδωρος, meaning "god-gift"). As the name survived throughout the Middle Ages, it transformed into a multitude of forms in the languages of Western Europe
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Brittany
Brittany
Brittany
(/ˈbrɪtəni/; French: Bretagne [bʁətaɲ] ( listen); Breton: Breizh, pronounced [bʁɛjs] or [bʁɛχ];[1] Gallo: Bertaèyn, pronounced [bəʁtaɛɲ]) is a cultural region in the northwest of France, covering the western part of what was known as Armorica
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Armorica
Armorica
Armorica
or Aremorica is the name given in ancient times to the part of Gaul
Gaul
between the Seine
Seine
and the Loire
Loire
that includes the Brittany Peninsula, extending inland to an indeterminate point and down the Atlantic Coast.[1] The toponym is based on the Gaulish phrase are-mori "on/at [the] sea", made into the Gaulish place name Aremorica (*are-mor-ika) "Place by the Sea". The suffix -ika was first used to create adjectival forms and then names (see regions such as Pays d'Ouche from Utica and Perche
Perche
from Pertica). The original designation was vague, including a large part of what became Normandy
Normandy
in the 10th century and, in some interpretations, the whole of the coast down to the Garonne
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