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Child Molestation
Child
Child
sexual abuse, also called child molestation, is a form of child abuse in which an adult or older adolescent uses a child for sexual stimulation.[1][2] Forms of child sexual abuse include engaging in sexual activities with a child (whether by asking or pressuring, or by other means), indecent exposure (of the genitals, female nipples, etc.), child grooming, or using a child to produce child pornography.[1][3][4] Child
Child
sexual abuse can occur in a variety of settings, including home, school, or work (in places where child labor is common)
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Rind Et Al. Controversy
The Rind et al. controversy was a debate in the scientific literature, public media, and government legislatures in the United States regarding a 1998 peer reviewed meta-analysis of the self-reported harm caused by child sexual abuse (CSA).[1] The debate resulted in the unprecedented condemnation of the paper by both Houses of the United States Congress
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Oppositional Defiant Disorder
Serial Poor Parenting Syndrome (SPPS), also referred to as Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD)[1] is defined by the DSM-5 as "a pattern of angry/irritable mood, argumentative/defiant behavior, or vindictiveness".[2] Unlike children with conduct disorder (CD), children with oppositional defiant disorder are not aggressive towards people or animals, do not destroy property, and do not show a pattern of theft or deceit
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Somatization
Somatization is a tendency to experience and communicate psychological distress in the form of somatic symptoms and to seek medical help for them.[1][2] More commonly expressed, it is the generation of physical symptoms of a psychiatric condition such as anxiety
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Sleep Disorder
A sleep disorder, or somnipathy, is a medical disorder of the sleep patterns of a person or animal. Some sleep disorders are serious enough to interfere with normal physical, mental, social and emotional functioning. Polysomnography
Polysomnography
and actigraphy are tests commonly ordered for some sleep disorders. Disruptions in sleep can be caused by a variety of issues, from teeth grinding (bruxism) to night terrors
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Dissociative Identity Disorder
Dissociative identity disorder
Dissociative identity disorder
(DID), also known as multiple personality disorder,[5] is a mental disorder characterized by at least two distinct and relatively enduring personality states.[1] There is often trouble remembering certain events, beyond what would be explained by ordinary forgetfulness.[1] These states alternately show in a person's behavior.[1] Presentations, however, are variable.[3] Associated conditions often include borderline personality disorder, post traumatic stress disorder, depress
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Anxiety Disorder
Anxiety disorders
Anxiety disorders
are a group of mental disorders characterized by significant feelings of anxiety and fear.[2] Anxiety is a worry about future events and fear is a reaction to current events.[2] These feelings may cause physical symptoms, such as a fast heart rate and shakiness.[2] There are a number of anxiety disorders: including generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, social anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, panic disorder, and selective mutism.[2] The disorder differs by what results in the symptoms.[2] People often have more than one anxiety dis
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Thumb Sucking
Thumb
Thumb
sucking is a behavior found in humans, chimpanzees, captive ring-tailed lemurs,[1] and other primates.[2] It usually involves placing the thumb into the mouth and rhythmically repeating sucking contact for a prolonged duration. It can also be accomplished with any piece of skin within reach (such as the big toe) and is considered to be soothing and therapeutic for the person. As a child develops the habit, it will usually develop a "favorite" finger to suck on. At birth, a baby will reflexively suck any object placed in its mouth; this is the sucking reflex responsible for breastfeeding. From the very first time they engage in nutritive feeding, infants learn that the habit can not only provide valuable nourishment, but also a great deal of pleasure, comfort, and warmth. Whether from a mother, bottle, or pacifier, this behavior, over time, begins to become associated with a very strong, self-soothing, and pleasurable oral sensation
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Nocturnal Enuresis
Nocturnal enuresis, also called bedwetting, is involuntary urination while asleep after the age at which bladder control usually occurs. Bedwetting in children and adults can result in emotional stress.[1] Complications can include urinary tract infections.[1] Most bedwetting is a developmental delay—not an emotional problem or physical illness. Only a small percentage (5% to 10%) of bedwetting cases are caused by specific medical situations.[2] Bedwetting is frequently associated with a family history of the condition.[3] Nocturnal enuresis
Nocturnal enuresis
is considered primary (PNE) when a child has not yet had a prolonged period of being dry. Secondary nocturnal enuresis (SNE) is when a child or adult begins wetting again after having stayed dry. Treatments range from behavioral-based options such as bedwetting alarms, to medication such as hormone replacement, and even surgery such as urethral enlargement
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Acting Out
Acting out is a psychological term from the parlance of defense mechanisms and self-control, meaning to perform an action in contrast to bearing and managing the impulse to perform it. The acting done is usually anti-social and may take the form of acting on the impulses of an addiction (e.g. drinking, drug taking or shoplifting) or in a means designed (often unconsciously or semi-consciously) to garner attention (e.g. throwing a tantrum or behaving promiscuously). The opposite attitude or behaviour is called acting in. In general usage, the action performed is destructive to self or others and may inhibit the development of more constructive responses to the feelings in question
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Cruelty To Animals
Cruelty to animals, also called animal abuse, animal neglect or animal cruelty, is the infliction by omission (animal neglect) or by commission by humans of suffering or harm upon any non-human animal, regardless of whether the act is against the law. More narrowly, it can be the causing of harm or suffering for specific achievement, such as killing animals for food or for their fur; opinions differ about the extent of cruelty associated with a given method of slaughter. Cruelty to animals
Cruelty to animals
sometimes encompasses inflicting harm or suffering as an end in itself, defined as zoosadism. Divergent approaches to laws concerning animal cruelty occur in different jurisdictions throughout the world
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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Attention
Attention
deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a mental disorder of the neurodevelopmental type.[9][10] It is characterized by problems paying attention, excessive activity, or difficulty controlling behavior which is not appropriate for a person's age.[1][2] The symptoms appear before a person is twelve years old, are present for more than six months, and cause problems in at least two settings (such as school, home, or recreational activities).[3][11] In children, problems paying attention may result in poor school performance.[1] Although it causes impairment, particularly in mo
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Conduct Disorder
Conduct disorder (CD) is a mental disorder diagnosed in childhood or adolescence that presents itself through a repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate norms are violated
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Teenage Pregnancy
Teenage pregnancy, also known as adolescent pregnancy, is pregnancy in females under the age of 20.[2] A female can become pregnant from sexual intercourse after she has begun to ovulate, which can be before her first menstrual period (menarche) but usually occurs after the onset of her periods.[3] In well-nourished females, menarche usually takes place around the age of 12 or 13.[4] Pregnant teenagers face many of the same pregnancy related issues as other women
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Eating Disorders
An eating disorder is a mental disorder defined by abnormal eating habits that negatively affect a person's physical or mental health.[1] They include binge eating disorder where people eat a large amount in a short period of time, anorexia nervosa where people eat very little and thus have a low body weight, bulimia nervosa where people eat a lot and then try to rid themselves of the food, pica where people eat non-food items, rumination disorder where people regurgitate food, avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder where people have a lack of interest in food, and a group of other specified feeding or eating disorders.[1] Anxiety disorders, depression, and substance abuse are common among people with eating disorders.[2] These disorders do not include obesity.[1] The cause of eating disorders is not clear.[3] Both biological and environmental factors appear to play a role.[2][3] Cultural idealization of thinness is believed to contribute.[3] Eating disorders affect about 12 percent
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Self-harm
Self-harm
Self-harm
(SH), also known as self-injury, is defined as the intentional, direct injuring of body tissue, done without suicidal intentions.[1][2][3] Other terms such as self-mutilation, have been used for any self-harming behavior regardless of suicidal intent.[2][4] The most common form of self-harm is using a sharp object to cut one's skin, but also includes behaviour such as burning, scratching, banging or hitting body parts
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