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Child Prodigy
In psychology research literature, the term child prodigy is defined as a person under the age of ten who produces meaningful output in some domain to the level of an adult expert performer.[1][2][3] The term Wunderkind (from German: Wunderkind, literally "wonder child") is sometimes used as a synonym for "prodigy", particularly in media accounts
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Gadna (Israel)
Gadna (Hebrew: גדנ״ע‬) is an Israeli military program that prepares young people for military service in the Israel Defense Forces. It was established before the foundation of the State of Israel and was anchored in law in 1949. Today it is a one-week program of discipline and military training usually under commanders serving with the Nahal infantry brigade. Gadna hosts an estimated 19,000 Israeli youth annually, as well as numerous foreign youths.[1]Contents1 History 2 Insignia 3 Structure3.1 Bases4 Controversies 5 ReferencesHistory[edit]David Ben-Gurion visiting a Gadna base in Be'er Ora (1957)Gadna, an abbreviation for Gdudei No'ar (גדודי נוער‬; lit. youth battalions), was an organization for youth created before the Israeli Declaration of Independence.[2] Alongside preliminary training for military service, Gadna clubs taught Zionist history, promoted love of the Land of Israel and encouraged members to engage in farming and volunteerism
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José Raúl Capablanca
José Raúl Capablanca
José Raúl Capablanca
y Graupera (19 November 1888 – 8 March 1942) was a Cuban chess player who was world chess champion from 1921 to 1927. A chess prodigy, he is considered by many as one of the greatest players of all time, widely renowned for his exceptional endgame skill and speed of play. Born in Havana, he beat Cuban champion Juan Corzo
Juan Corzo
in a match two days before his thirteenth birthday on 17 November 1901.[1][2] His victory over Frank Marshall in a match in 1909 earned him an invitation to the 1911 San Sebastian tournament, which he won ahead of players such as Akiba Rubinstein, Aron Nimzowitsch and Siegbert Tarrasch. During the next several years, Capablanca had a strong series of tournament results. After several unsuccessful attempts to arrange a match with the then world champion Emanuel Lasker, Capablanca finally won the title from Lasker in 1921
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Pelé
Edson Arantes do Nascimento (Brazilian Portuguese: [ˈɛtsõ (w)ɐˈɾɐ̃tʃiz du nɐsiˈmẽtu]; born 23 October 1940), known as Pelé
Pelé
([peˈlɛ]), is a Brazilian retired professional footballer who played as a forward. He is widely regarded as the greatest football player of all time. In 1999, he was voted World Player of the Century by the International Federation of Football History & Statistics (IFFHS). That same year, Pelé
Pelé
was elected Athlete of the Century by the International Olympic Committee. According to the IFFHS, Pelé
Pelé
is the most successful league goal-scorer in the world, scoring 1281 goals in 1363 games, which included unofficial friendlies and tour games
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Jeff Gordon
Jeffery Michael "Jeff" Gordon[1] (born August 4, 1971) is an American former professional stock car racing driver, currently an announcer for Fox NASCAR, and a top executive for Hendrick Motorsports. He formerly drove the No. 24 Chevrolet
Chevrolet
for Hendrick Motorsports
Hendrick Motorsports
in 23 full-time NASCAR
NASCAR
Sprint Cup Series
Sprint Cup Series
seasons between 1993 and 2015, and served as a substitute driver for Dale Earnhardt Jr.
Dale Earnhardt Jr.
in the No. 88 Hendrick Motorsports
Hendrick Motorsports
Chevrolet
Chevrolet
in select races during the 2016 season. Gordon started his professional racing career in the Busch Series
Busch Series
with Hugh Connerty Racing, followed by Bill Davis Racing, winning three races, and began racing full-time in the Cup Series for Hendrick Motorsports in 1993
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Camille Saint-Saëns
Charles- Camille Saint-Saëns
Camille Saint-Saëns
(French: [ʃaʁl kamij sɛ̃sɑ̃s];[n 1] 9 October 1835 – 16 December 1921) was a French composer, organist, conductor and pianist of the Romantic era. His best-known works include Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso (1863), the Second Piano Concerto (1868), the First Cello Concerto (1872), Danse macabre (1874), the opera Samson and Delilah (1877), the Third Violin Concerto (1880), the Third ("Organ") Symphony (1886) and The Carnival of the Animals
The Carnival of the Animals
(1886). Saint-Saëns was a musical prodigy, making his concert debut at the age of ten. After studying at the Paris Conservatoire
Paris Conservatoire
he followed a conventional career as a church organist, first at Saint-Merri, Paris and, from 1858, La Madeleine, the official church of the French Empire
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Pablo Picasso
Pablo Picasso
Picasso
(/pɪˈkɑːsoʊ, -ˈkæsoʊ/;[2] Spanish: [ˈpaβlo piˈkaso]; 25 October 1881 – 8 April 1973) was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, stage designer, poet and playwright who spent most of his adult life in France. Regarded as one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist
Cubist
movement, the invention of constructed sculpture,[3][4] the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore. Among his most famous works are the proto- Cubist
Cubist
Les Demoiselles d' Avignon
Avignon
(1907), and Guernica (1937), a dramatic portrayal of the bombing of Guernica by the German and Italian airforces. Picasso
Picasso
demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a naturalistic manner through his childhood and adolescence
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Sylvia Plath
Sylvia Plath
Sylvia Plath
(/plæθ/; October 27, 1932 – February 11, 1963) was an American poet, novelist, and short-story writer. Born in Boston, she studied at Smith College
Smith College
and Newnham College
Newnham College
at the University of Cambridge
University of Cambridge
before receiving acclaim as a poet and writer. She married fellow poet Ted Hughes
Ted Hughes
in 1956, and they lived together in the United States and then in England. They had two children, Frieda and Nicholas, before separating in 1962. Plath was clinically depressed for most of her adult life, and was treated multiple times with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)
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Rabindranath Tagore
Rabindranath Tagore[a] FRAS (/rəˈbɪndrənɑːt tæˈɡɔːr/ ( listen); Bengali: [robind̪ronat̪ʰ ʈʰakur]), also written Ravīndranātha Ṭhākura[2] (7 May 1861 – 7 August 1941),[b] sobriquet Gurudev,[c] was a Bengali polymath[4][5] who reshaped Bengali literature
Bengali literature
and music, as well as Indian art
Indian art
with Contextual Modernism
Contextual Modernism
in the late 19th and early 20th centuries
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Terence Tao
Terence Chi-Shen Tao FAA FRS (born 17 July 1975) is an Australian-American mathematician who has worked in various areas of mathematics. He currently focuses on harmonic analysis, partial differential equations, algebraic combinatorics, arithmetic combinatorics, geometric combinatorics, compressed sensing and analytic number theory. As of 2015[update], he holds the James and Carol Collins chair in mathematics at the University of California, Los Angeles
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Positron Emission Tomography
Positron-emission tomography (PET)[1] is a nuclear medicine functional imaging technique that is used to observe metabolic processes in the body as an aid to the diagnosis of disease. The system detects pairs of gamma rays emitted indirectly by a positron-emitting radionuclide (tracer), which is introduced into the body on a biologically active molecule. Three-dimensional images of tracer concentration within the body are then constructed by computer analysis. In modern PET-CT scanners, three-dimensional imaging is often accomplished with the aid of a CT X-ray
X-ray
scan performed on the patient during the same session, in the same machine. If the biologically active molecule chosen for PET is fludeoxyglucose (FDG), an analogue of glucose, the concentrations of tracer imaged will indicate tissue metabolic activity as it corresponds to the regional glucose uptake
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János Bólyai
János Bolyai (Hungarian: [ˈjaːnoʃ ˈboːjɒi]; 15 December 1802 – 27 January 1860) or Johann Bolyai,[2] was a Hungarian mathematician, one of the founders of non-Euclidean geometry — a geometry that differs from Euclidean geometry in its definition of parallel lines
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Memory
Memory
Memory
is the faculty of the mind by which information is encoded, stored, and retrieved. Memory
Memory
is vital to experiences and related to limbic systems, it is the retention of information over time for the purpose of influencing future action.[1] If we could not remember past events, we could not learn or develop language, relationships, nor personal identity (Eysenck, 2012). Often memory is understood as an informational processing system with explicit and implicit functioning that is made up of a sensory processor, short-term (or working) memory, and long-term memory (Baddely, 2007).[better source needed] This can be related to the neuron
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Srinivasa Ramanujan
Srinivasa Ramanujan FRS (/ˈʃriːniˌvɑːsə rɑːˈmɑːnʊdʒən/;[1]  listen (help·info); 22 December 1887 – 26 April 1920) was an Indian mathematician who lived during the British Rule in India. Though he had almost no formal training in pure mathematics, he made substantial contributions to mathematical analysis, number theory, infinite series, and continued fractions, including solutions to mathematical problems considered to be unsolvable. Ramanujan initially developed his own mathematical research in isolation; it was quickly recognized by Indian mathematicians. Seeking mathematicians who could better understand his work, in 1913 he began a postal partnership with the English mathematician G. H. Hardy at the University of Cambridge, England. Recognizing the extraordinary work sent to him as samples, Hardy arranged travel for Ramanujan to Cambridge
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Mental Image
A mental image or mental picture is the representation in a person's mind of the physical world outside that person.[1] It is an experience that, on most occasions, significantly resembles the experience of perceiving some object, event, or scene, but occurs when the relevant object, event, or scene is not actually present to the senses.[2][3][4][5] There are sometimes episodes, particularly on falling asleep (hypnagogic imagery) and waking up (hypnopompic), when the mental imagery, being of a rapid, phantasmagoric and involuntary character, defies perception, presenting a kaleidoscopic field, in which no distinct object can be discerned.[6] Mental imagery can sometimes produce the same effects as would be produced by the behavior or experience imagined.[7] The nature of these experiences, what makes them possible, and their function (if any) have long been subjects of research and controversy[further explanation needed] in philosophy, psychology, cognitive science, and, more recently,
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Évariste Galois
Évariste Galois
Évariste Galois
(/ɡælˈwɑː/;[1] French: [evaʁist ɡalwa]; 25 October 1811 – 31 May 1832) was a French mathematician. While still in his teens, he was able to determine a necessary and sufficient condition for a polynomial to be solvable by radicals, thereby solving a problem standing for 350 years. His work laid the foundations for Galois theory
Galois theory
and group theory,[2] two major branches of abstract algebra, and the subfield of Galois connections
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