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Chief Secretary For Ireland
The Chief Secretary for Ireland
Chief Secretary for Ireland
was a key political office in the British administration in Ireland. Nominally subordinate to the Lord Lieutenant, and officially the "Chief Secretary to the Lord Lieutenant",[1] from the early 19th century until the end of British rule he was effectively the government minister with responsibility for governing Ireland; usually it was the Chief Secretary, rather than the Lord Lieutenant, who sat in the British Cabinet.[2] The Chief Secretary was ex officio President of the Local Government Board for Ireland from its creation in 1872.[3] British rule over much of Ireland came to an end as the result of the Irish War of Independence, which culminated in the establishment of the Irish Free State. In consequence the office of Chief Secretary was abolished, as well as that of Lord Lieutenant
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Style (manner Of Address)
A style of office or honorific is an official or legally recognized title.[1][2] A style, by tradition or law, precedes a reference to a person who holds a post or political office, and is sometimes used to refer to the office itself. An honorific can also be awarded to an individual in a personal capacity. Such styles are particularly associated with monarchies, where they may be used by a wife of an office holder or of a prince of the blood, for the duration of their marriage
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Westminster System
The Westminster system
Westminster system
is a parliamentary system of government developed in the United Kingdom. This term comes from the Palace of Westminster, the seat of the British Parliament. The system is a series of procedures for operating a legislature
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The Right Honourable
The Right Honourable (The Rt Hon. or Rt Hon.) is an honorific style traditionally applied to certain persons and to certain collective bodies in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, India, some other Commonwealth realms, the Anglophone Caribbean, Mauritius, and occasionally elsewhere
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Responsible Government
Responsible government
Responsible government
is a conception of a system of government that embodies the principle of parliamentary accountability, the foundation of the Westminster system
Westminster system
of parliamentary democracy.[citation needed] Governments (the equivalent of the executive branch) in Westminster democracies are responsible to parliament rather than to the monarch, or, in a colonial context, to the imperial government, and in a republican context, to the president, either in full or in part. If the parliament is bicameral, then the government is responsible first to the parliament's lower house, which is more representative than the upper house, as it has more members and they are always directly elected. Responsible government
Responsible government
of parliamentary accountability manifests itself in several ways
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Elizabeth I Of England
Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603)[1] was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana
Gloriana
or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the last monarch of the House of Tudor. Elizabeth was the daughter of Henry VIII
Henry VIII
and Anne Boleyn, his second wife, who was executed two-and-a-half years after Elizabeth's birth. Anne's marriage to Henry VIII
Henry VIII
was annulled, and Elizabeth was declared illegitimate. Her half-brother, Edward VI, ruled until his death in 1553, bequeathing the crown to Lady Jane Grey
Lady Jane Grey
and ignoring the claims of his two half-sisters, Elizabeth and the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Mary, in spite of statute law to the contrary. Edward's will was set aside and Mary became queen, deposing Lady Jane Grey
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Thomas Radclyffe, 3rd Earl Of Sussex
Contents1 People 2 Manufacturing companies 3 Places 4 Religion 5 Television 6 Fictional characters 7 Other uses 8 See alsoPeople[edit] Thomas (name), a masculine given name Thomas (surname) Thomas the Apostle, see also Saint Thomas (other) Thomas (activist)
Thomas (activist)
(1947–2009), anti-nuclear and anti-war activistManufacturing companies[edit] Thomas Built Buses Thomas Motor Company, a former US manufacturer of motorcycles and automobiles Thomas & Betts, a designer and manufacturer of connectors and components for electrical and communication markets Thomas-Detroit (automobile), a former U.S
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John Challoner
His Excellency, The Right Reverend Bishop
Bishop
Richard Challoner, Bishop
Bishop
of Doberus
Doberus
(29 September 1691 – 12 January 1781) was an English Roman Catholic bishop, a leading figure of English Catholicism during the greater part of the 18th century. He is perhaps most famous for his revision of the Douay–Rheims translation of the Bible.Contents1 Early life 2 Education and academic career in France 3 Return to England 4 Revision of English Bible 5 Other works 6 Later career 7 Final years 8 Legacy 9 See also 10 Sources10.1 Footnotes 10.2 References11 External linksEarly life[edit] Challoner was born in Lewes, Sussex
Sussex
on 29 September 1691. His father, also Richard Challoner, was married by licence granted on 17 January, either 1690 or 1691, to Grace (née Willard) at Ringmer, Sussex
Sussex
on 10 February
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Dublin
Dublin
Dublin
(/ˈdʌblɪn/, Irish: Baile Átha Cliath[11] Irish pronunciation: [ˌbʲlʲɑː ˈclʲiə]) is the capital of and largest city in Ireland.[12][13] Dublin
Dublin
is located in the province of Leinster
Leinster
on the east coast of Ireland, at the mouth of the River Liffey and bordered on the South by the Wicklow Mountains
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Member Of Parliament (pre-Union Ireland)
The Parliament of Ireland
Ireland
was the legislature of the Lordship of Ireland, and later the Kingdom of Ireland, from the 13th century until 1800. It was modelled on the Parliament of England
Parliament of England
and from 1537 comprised two chambers: the House of Commons and the House of Lords. The Lords were members of the Irish peerage ("lords temporal") and bishops ("lords spiritual"; after the Reformation, Church of Ireland bishops). The Commons was directly elected, albeit on a very restricted franchise
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Acts Of Union 1800
The Acts of Union 1800
Acts of Union 1800
(sometimes erroneously referred to as a single Act of Union 1801) were parallel acts of the Parliament of Great Britain and the Parliament of Ireland
Parliament of Ireland
which united the Kingdom of Great Britain
Great Britain
and the Kingdom of Ireland
Kingdom of Ireland
(previously in personal union) to create the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland
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Poynings' Law
Poynings' Law or the Statute of Drogheda[1] ( 10 Hen.7 c.4 [The Irish Statutes numbering] or 10 Hen.7 c.9 [Analecta Hibernica numbering]; later titled "An Act that no Parliament be holden in this Land until the Acts be certified into England") was a 1494 Act of the Parliament of Ireland
Ireland
which provided that the parliament could not meet until its proposed legislation had been approved both by Ireland's Lord Deputy and Privy Council and by England's monarch and Privy Council
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United Kingdom Of Great Britain And Ireland
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland
Ireland
was a sovereign country in western Europe, the predecessor to the modern United Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
and Northern Ireland. It was established on 1 January 1801 by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the kingdoms of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland. Britain financed the European coalition that defeated France in 1815 in the Napoleonic Wars. Britain, with its unsurpassed Royal Navy
Royal Navy
and British Empire, became the foremost world power for the next century. The Crimean War
Crimean War
with Russia and the Boer wars were relatively small operations in a largely peaceful century.[1] Rapid industrialisation that began in the decades prior to the state's formation continued up until the mid-19th century
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List Of Chief Secretaries For Ireland
A secretary or personal assistant is a person whose work consists of supporting management, including executives, using a variety of project management, communication, or organizational skills. These functions may be entirely carried out to assist one other employee or may be for the benefit of more than one. In other situations a secretary is an officer of a society or organization who deals with correspondence, admits new members, and organizes official meetings and events.[1][2][3]Contents1 Duties and functions 2 Etymology 3 Origin 4 Modern developments 5 Contemporary employment 6 Training by country6.1 Belgium 6.2 United States7 Executive assistant7.1 Civilian 7.2 Military8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksDuties and functions[edit]This section possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed
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National Archives Of Ireland
The National Archives of Ireland
National Archives of Ireland
(Irish: Cartlann Náisiúnta na hÉireann) is the official repository for the state records of Ireland. Established by the National Archives Act 1986, it came into existence on 1 June 1988, taking over the functions of the State Paper Office and the Public Record Office of Ireland. The National Archives moved to its current premises in Bishop Street, Dublin, in 1991. The Archives stand on the site of the Jacob's
Jacob's
Factory, one of the garrisons held by rebels during the 1916 Easter Rising. The State Paper Office (founded 1702) was originally based in Dublin Castle and remained there until 1990
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Irish Statute Book
The Irish Statute Book, also known as the electronic Irish Statute Book (eISB), is a database produced by the Office of the Attorney General of Ireland. It contains copies of Acts of the Oireachtas and statutory instruments.[2][3][4] It also contains a Legislation Directory which includes chronological tables of pre-1922 legislation.[5] It is published on a website (irishstatutebook.ie) and was formerly published on CD-ROM.[3][6] In 2001, the Irish Law Times said that whilst the Attorney General's staff deserved to be congratulated for the Irish Statute Book, the CD-ROM
CD-ROM
version contained a "significant number of errors".[6] See also[edit]Law of the Republic of IrelandReferences[edit]Irish Statute Book. N-Lex. OECD
OECD
(2010). Better Regulation in Europe: Ireland 2010. OEDC Publishing. ISBN 978-92-64-09508-3. Page 93. Digitized copy from Google Books
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