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Chief Secretary’s Building
The Chief Secretary’s building (originally the Colonial Secretary's building) is a heritage-listed[3] state government administrative building of the Victorian Free Classical architectural style located at 121 Macquarie Street, 65 Bridge Street, and at 44-50 Phillip Street in the Sydney
Sydney
central business district of New South Wales, Australia. The ornate five-storey public building was designed by Colonial Architect James Barnet
James Barnet
and built in two stages, the first stages being levels one to four completed between 1873 and 1881, with Walter Liberty Vernon completing the second stage between 1894 and 1896 when the mansard at level 5 and the dome were added.[1] The sandstone building was the seat of colonial administration, has been used continuously by the Government of New South Wales, and even today holds the office of the Governor of New South Wales
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Macquarie Street, Sydney
Macquarie Street is a street in the central business district of Sydney
Sydney
in New South Wales, Australia. Macquarie Street extends from Hyde Park at its southern end to the Sydney
Sydney
Opera House at its northern end
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Birchgrove, New South Wales
Birchgrove is a suburb in the Inner West[2] of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Birchgrove is located five kilometres west of the Sydney
Sydney
central business district, in the local government area of the Inner West
Inner West
Council. Birchgrove is located on the north-west slope of the Balmain peninsula, overlooking Sydney
Sydney
Harbour, and includes Yurulbin and Ballast Points. Balmain is the only adjacent suburb. The long waterfront provides views of the Parramatta River
Parramatta River
with Cockatoo Island dominating the foreground
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Aluminium
Aluminium
Aluminium
or aluminum is a chemical element with symbol Al and atomic number 13. It is a silvery-white, soft, nonmagnetic and ductile metal in the boron group. By mass, aluminium makes up about 8% of the Earth's crust; it is the third most abundant element after oxygen and silicon and the most abundant metal in the crust, though it is less common in the mantle below. The chief ore of aluminium is bauxite. Aluminium
Aluminium
metal is so chemically reactive that native specimens are rare and limited to extreme reducing environments. Instead, it is found combined in over 270 different minerals.[5] Aluminium
Aluminium
is remarkable for its low density and its ability to resist corrosion through the phenomenon of passivation
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Queen Victoria
Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom
Queen of the United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death. On 1 May 1876, she adopted the additional title of Empress of India. Victoria was the daughter of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, the fourth son of King George III. Both the Duke of Kent and King George III
King George III
died in 1820, and Victoria was raised under close supervision by her German-born mother, Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. She inherited the throne at the age of 18, after her father's three elder brothers had all died, leaving no surviving legitimate children. The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
was already an established constitutional monarchy, in which the sovereign held relatively little direct political power
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Merino
The Merino
Merino
is an economically influential breed of sheep prized for its wool. The breed originated in Southwestern Iberia (Extremadura, Spain), but the modern Merino
Merino
was domesticated in New Zealand
New Zealand
and Australia. Today, Merinos are still regarded as having some of the finest and softest wool of any sheep
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Flag Of New South Wales
The current state flag of New South Wales
New South Wales
was officially adopted by the government of New South Wales
New South Wales
in 1876. The flag is based on the defaced British Blue Ensign
Blue Ensign
with the state badge located in the fly
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Pediment
A pediment is an architectural element found particularly in classical, neoclassical and baroque architecture, and its derivatives, consisting of a gable, usually of a triangular shape, placed above the horizontal structure of the entablature, typically supported by columns. The tympanum, the triangular area within the pediment, is often decorated with relief sculpture.Contents1 History 2 Gallery 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The pediment is found in classical Greek temples, renaissance, and neoclassical architecture. A prominent example is the Parthenon, where it contains a tympanum decorated with figures in relief sculpture. This architectural element was developed in the architecture of ancient Greece. In Ancient Rome, the Renaissance, and later architectural revivals, the pediment was used as a non-structural element over windows, doors and aedicules.Swan-neck pediment at the Rev
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Bust (sculpture)
A bust is a sculpted or cast representation of the upper part of the human figure, depicting a person's head and neck, and a variable portion of the chest and shoulders. The piece is normally supported by a plinth. These forms recreate the likeness of an individual. These may be of any medium used for sculpture, such as marble, bronze, terracotta or wood. A parallel term, aust, is a representation of the upper part of an animal or mythical creature. Sculptural portrait heads from classical antiquity are sometimes displayed as busts. However, these are often fragments from full-body statues, or were created to be inserted into an existing body; these portrait heads are not included in this article.Contents1 Pictorial timeline 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksPictorial timeline[edit] Pericles with the Corinthian helmet
Pericles with the Corinthian helmet
(marble, Roman after a Greek original, c
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Office Of Public Works And Services, New South Wales
NSW Public Works (or New South Wales
New South Wales
Public Works), an agency of the Government of New South Wales, is responsible for providing expert advice to government and professional services to government agency clients in New South Wales, Australia. The agency manages a range of large and small projects and facilities contracts with an annual value of more than A$1 billion.[2] The agency is led by Deputy Director-General, presently Brian Baker, who reports to the Director General of the Department of Finance, Services and Innovation, presently Martin Hoffman, who reports to the Minister for Finance, Services and Property, presently the Honourable Victor Dominello
Victor Dominello
MP. References[edit]^ "Department of Finance and Services". NSW Government Directory. Government of New South Wales. 2011. Retrieved 20 November 2011.  ^ "About NSW Public Works". NSW Public Works. Government of New South Wales
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Edward VII
Edward VII
Edward VII
(Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions
British Dominions
and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death in 1910. The eldest son of Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
and Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, Edward was related to royalty throughout Europe. Before his accession to the throne, he was heir apparent and held the title of Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
for longer than any of his predecessors. During the long reign of his mother, he was largely excluded from political power, and came to personify the fashionable, leisured elite. He travelled throughout Britain performing ceremonial public duties, and represented Britain on visits abroad
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Prince Of Wales
Prince of Wales
Wales
(Welsh: Tywysog Cymru) was a title granted to princes born in Wales
Wales
from the 12th century onwards; the term replaced the use of the word king. One of the last Welsh princes, Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, was killed in battle in 1282 by Edward I, King of England, whose son Edward (born in Caernarfon Castle
Caernarfon Castle
in Wales) was invested as the first English Prince of Wales
Wales
in 1301. Since the 14th century, the title has been a dynastic title granted to the heir apparent to the English or British monarch, but the failure to be granted the title does not affect the rights to royal succession. The title is granted to the heir apparent as a personal honour or dignity, and is not heritable, merging with the Crown on accession to the throne
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Achille Simonetti (sculptor)
Achille Simonetti (1838–1900) was a sculptor in Australia. He undertook many important commissions.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Later life 4 Significant works 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Simonetti was born in Rome, Italy, the son of a sculptor. Career[edit] In 1871 James O'Quinn, Roman Catholic Bishop of Brisbane, persuaded Simonetti to immigrate to Brisbane, Queensland
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Balmain, New South Wales
Balmain, New South Wales
New South Wales
is a suburb in the Inner West[2] of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Balmain is located 6 km west of the Sydney
Sydney
central business district, in the local government area of the Inner West
Inner West
Council. It sits on a small peninsula that juts out of Sydney
Sydney
Harbour, directly opposite Milson's Point. It is located on the Balmain peninsula surrounded by Port Jackson, adjacent to the suburbs of Rozelle to the south-west, Birchgrove to the north-west, and Balmain East to the east. Iron Cove sits on the western side of the peninsula, with White Bay on the south-east side and Mort Bay on the north-east side. Traditionally Blue Collar, Balmain was where the industrial roots of the Trade Unionist
Trade Unionist
movement began
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Michelangelo
Michelangelo
Michelangelo
di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni or more commonly known by his first name Michelangelo
Michelangelo
(/ˌmaɪkəlˈændʒəloʊ/; Italian: [mikeˈlandʒelo di lodoˈviːko
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Cornice
A cornice (from the Italian cornice meaning "ledge") is generally any horizontal decorative molding that crowns a building or furniture element – the cornice over a door or window, for instance, or the cornice around the top edge of a pedestal or along the top of an interior wall. A simple cornice may be formed just with a crown. The function of the projecting cornice of a building is to throw rainwater free of the building’s walls. In residential building practice, this function is handled by projecting gable ends, roof eaves, and gutters. However, house eaves may also be called "cornices" if they are finished with decorative molding
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