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Chicken
The chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) is a type of domesticated fowl, a subspecies of the red junglefowl. It is one of the most common and widespread domestic animals, with a total population of more than 19 billion as of 2011. There are more chickens than any other bird or domesticated fowl.[1] Humans keep chickens primarily as a source of food (consuming both their meat and eggs) and, more rarely, as pets. Genetic studies have pointed to multiple maternal origins in Southeast Asia, East Asia,[2] and South Asia, but with the clade found in the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and Africa originating in the Indian subcontinent
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Syria
Coordinates: 35°N 38°E / 35°N 38°E / 35; 38Syrian Arab
Arab
Republic الجمهورية العربية السورية (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-ʻArabīyah as-SūrīyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "حماة الديار" (Arabic) Humat ad-Diyar Guardians of the HomelandCapital and largest city Damascus 33°30′N 36°18′E / 33.500°N 36.300°E / 33.500; 36.300Official languages ArabicEthnic groupsSyrian Arabs Arameans Kurds Turkomans Assyrians Circassians ArmeniansReligion 87% Islam 10% Christianity 3% Druzis
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Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus
Linnaeus
(/lɪˈniːəs, lɪˈneɪəs/;[1][2] 23 May[note 1] 1707 – 10 January 1778), also known after his ennoblement as Carl von Linné[3] (Swedish pronunciation: [kɑːɭ fɔn lɪˈneː] ( listen)), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist, who formalised the modern system of naming organisms called binomial nomenclature. He is known by the epithet "father of modern taxonomy".[4] Many of his writings were in Latin
Latin
and his name is rendered in Latin
Latin
as Carolus Linnæus (after 1761 Carolus a Linné). Linnaeus
Linnaeus
was born in the countryside of Småland, in southern Sweden. He received most of his higher education at Uppsala University
Uppsala University
and began giving lectures in botany there in 1730
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Deep South
The Deep South
Deep South
is a cultural and geographic subregion in the Southern United States. Historically, it was differentiated as those states most dependent on plantations and slave societies during the pre–Civil War period. The Deep South
Deep South
is commonly referred to as the Cotton States, given that the production of cotton was a primary commodity crop.[1][2]Contents1 Usage 2 Origins 3 Major metropolitan areas3.1 Metropolitan areas4 People 5 Politics 6 See also 7 References 8 Further readingUsage[edit]The location of the Black Belt (sociological sense) in the United States.The term "Deep South" is defined in a variety of ways:Most definitions include the states Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, South Carolina, Mississippi, and Louisiana.[3] Texas
Texas
is also included,[4] due to its history of slavery and as being a part of the Confederate States of America
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Educational Toy
Educational toys (sometimes called "instructive toys")[1] are objects of play, generally designed for children, which are expected to stimulate learning. They are often intended to meet an educational purpose such as helping a child develop a particular skill or teaching a child about a particular subject. They often simplify, miniaturize, or model activities and objects used by adults. Although children are constantly interacting with and learning about the world, many of the objects they interact with and learn from are not toys. Toys are generally considered to be specifically built for children's use. A child might play with and learn from a rock or a stick, but it would not be considered an educational toy because 1) it is a natural object, not a designed one, and 2) it has no expected educational purpose. The difference lies in perception or reality of the toy's intention and value. An educational toy is expected to educate
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Annals Of Thutmose III
The Annals of Thutmose III
Thutmose III
are composed of numerous inscriptions of ancient Egyptian military records gathered from the 18th dynasty campaigns of Thutmose III's armies in Syro-Palestine, from regnal years 22 (1458 BCE) to 42 (1438 BCE).[1] These recordings can be found on the inside walls of the chamber housing the "holy of holies" at the great Karnak Temple
Karnak Temple
of Amun. Measuring just 25 meters in length and 12 meters wide, the space containing these inscriptions presents the largest and most detailed accounts concerning military exploits of all Egyptian Kings.[2]Contents1 Campaigns 2 Historical
Historical
significance 3 Bibliography 4 References and footnotes 5 External linksCampaigns[edit] The most detailed and extravagant inscription on the wall at Karnak describes the first campaign, in year 23, of Thutmose III, which was the Battle of Megiddo
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Babylonia
Babylonia
Babylonia
(/ˌbæbəˈloʊniə, -ˈloʊnjə/) was an ancient Akkadian-speaking state and cultural area based in central-southern Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
(present-day Iraq). A small Amorite-ruled state emerged in 1894 BC, which contained the minor administrative town of Babylon.[1] It was merely a small provincial town during the Akkadian
Akkadian
Empire (2335–2154 BC) but greatly expanded during the reign of Hammurabi
Hammurabi
in the first half of the 18th century BC and became a major capital city. During the reign of Hammurabi
Hammurabi
and afterwards, Babylonia
Babylonia
was called "the country of Akkad" (Māt Akkadī in Akkadian).[2][3] It was often involved in rivalry with the older state of Assyria
Assyria
to the north and Elam
Elam
to the east in Ancient Iran
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Shinar
Shinar
Shinar
(/ˈʃaɪ.nɑːr/;[1] Hebrew שִׁנְעָר Šinʻar, Septuagint
Septuagint
Σεννααρ Sennaar) is the term used in the Hebrew Bible for the general region of Mesopotamia.Contents1 Etymology 2 Hebrew Bible 3 Jubilees 4 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The name may be a corruption of Hebrew Shene neharot ("two rivers"), Hebrew Shene arim ("two cities"),[2] or Akkadian Šumeru. Sayce (1895) identified Shinar
Shinar
as cognate with the following names: Sangara/Sangar mentioned in the context of the Asiatic conquests of Thutmose III
Thutmose III
(15th century BCE); Sanhar/Sankhar of the Amarna letters (14th century BCE); the Greeks' Singara; and modern Sinjar, in Upper Mesopotamia, near the Khabur River
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Anatolia
Anatolia
Anatolia
(Modern Greek: Ανατολία, Anatolía, from Ἀνατολή, Anatolḗ, modern pronunciation Anatolí;[needs IPA] Turkish: Anadolu "east" or "(sun)rise"), also known as Asia
Asia
Minor (in Medieval and Modern Greek: Μικρά Ἀσία, Mīkrá AsíaTurkish: Küçük Asya, , modern pronunciation Mikrá Asía – "small Asia"), Asian Turkey, the Anatolian peninsula, or the Anatolian plateau, is the westernmost protrusion of Asia, which makes up the majority of modern-day Turkey. The region is bounded by the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the north, the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the south, and the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
to the west
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Lydia
Lydia
Lydia
(Assyrian: Luddu; Greek: Λυδία, Lydía; Turkish: Lidya) was an Iron Age
Iron Age
kingdom of western Asia Minor
Asia Minor
located generally east of ancient Ionia
Ionia
in the modern western Turkish provinces of Uşak, Manisa and inland İzmir. Its population spoke an Anatolian language known as Lydian. Its capital was Sardis.[1] The Kingdom of Lydia
Lydia
existed from about 1200 BCE to 546 BCE. At its greatest extent during the 7th century BCE, it covered all of western Anatolia. In 546 BCE, it became a province of the Achaemenid Persian Empire, known as the satrapy of Lydia
Lydia
or Sparda in Old Persian
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Indian Subcontinent
The Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
or the subcontinent is a southern region of Asia, mostly situated on the Indian Plate
Indian Plate
and projecting southwards into the Indian Ocean
Indian Ocean
from the Himalayas
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Clade
A clade (from Ancient Greek: κλάδος, klados, "branch") is a group of organisms that consists of a common ancestor and all its lineal descendants, and represents a single "branch" on the "tree of life".[1] The common ancestor may be an individual, a population, a species (extinct or extant), and so on right up to a kingdom and further. Clades are nested, one in another, as each branch in turn splits into smaller branches. These splits reflect evolutionary history as populations diverged and evolved independently. Clades are termed monophyletic (Greek: "one clan") groups. Over the last few decades, the cladistic approach has revolutionized biological classification and revealed surprising evolutionary relationships among organisms.[2] Increasingly, taxonomists try to avoid naming taxa that are not clades; that is, taxa that are not monophyletic
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Castration
Castration
Castration
(also known as gonadectomy) is any action, surgical, chemical, or otherwise, by which an individual loses use of the testicles. Surgical
Surgical
castration is bilateral orchiectomy (excision of both testes), and chemical castration uses pharmaceutical drugs to deactivate the testes. Castration
Castration
causes sterilization (preventing them from reproducing); it also greatly reduces the production of certain hormones, such as testosterone. Surgical
Surgical
castration in animals is often called neutering. The term "castration" is sometimes also used to refer to the removal of the ovaries in the female, otherwise known as an oophorectomy or, in animals, spaying
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Lizard
Sauria
Sauria
Macartney, 1802Lizards are a widespread group of squamate reptiles, with over 6,000 species,[1] ranging across all continents except Antarctica, as well as most oceanic island chains. The group is paraphyletic as it excludes the snakes and Amphisbaenia
Amphisbaenia
which are also squamates. Lizards range in size from chameleons and geckos a few centimeters long to the 3 meter long Komodo dragon. Most lizards are quadrupedal, running with a strong side-to-side motion. Others are legless, and have long snake-like bodies. Some such as the forest-dwelling Draco lizards are able to glide
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Trinomen
In zoological nomenclature, a trinomen (plural: trinomina), trinominal name, or ternary name, refers to the name of a subspecies. For example: " Gorilla
Gorilla
gorilla gorilla" (Savage, 1847) for the western lowland gorilla (genus Gorilla, species western gorilla). A trinomen is a name with three parts: generic name, specific name and subspecific name. The first two parts alone form the binomen or species name. All three names are typeset in italics, and only the first letter of the generic name is capitalised. No indicator of rank is included: in zoology, subspecies is the only rank below that of species. For example: "Buteo jamaicensis borealis is one of the subspecies of the red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)." In a taxonomic publication, a name is incomplete without an author citation and publication details. This indicates who published the name, in what publication, and the date of the publication
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Mouse
A mouse (Mus), plural mice is a small rodent characteristically having a pointed snout, small rounded ears, a body-length scaly tail and a high breeding rate. The best known mouse species is the common house mouse (Mus musculus). It is also a popular pet. In some places, certain kinds of field mice are locally common. They are known to invade homes for food and shelter. Domestic mice sold as pets often differ substantially in size from the common house mouse. This is attributable both to breeding and to different conditions in the wild
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