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Chickasaw Wars
The Chickasaw
Chickasaw
Wars were fought in the 18th century between the Chickasaw
Chickasaw
allied with the British against the French and their allies the Choctaws
Choctaws
and Illinois Confederation. The Province of Louisiana extended from Illinois to New Orleans, and the French fought to secure their communications along the Mississippi
Mississippi
River. The Chickasaw, dwelling in northern Mississippi
Mississippi
and western Tennessee, lay across the French path. Much to the eventual advantage of the British and the later United States, the Chickasaw
Chickasaw
successfully held their ground
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American Indian Wars
The American Indian Wars, or Indian Wars is the collective name for the various armed conflicts fought by European governments and colonists, and later the United States
United States
government and American settlers, against the native peoples of North America. These conflicts occurred within the current boundaries of the United States
United States
and Canada from the time of the earliest colonial settlements in the 17th century until the 1920s. The Indian Wars resulted from competition for resources and land ownership as European and later American and Canadian settlers encroached onto territory which had been traditionally inhabited by Native Americans
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Tennessee
Tennessee
Tennessee
(/tɛnɪˈsiː/ ( listen); Cherokee: ᏔᎾᏏ, translit. Tanasi) is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. Tennessee
Tennessee
is the 36th largest and the 16th most populous of the 50 United States. Tennessee
Tennessee
is bordered by Kentucky and Virginia
Virginia
to the north, North Carolina
North Carolina
to the east, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi
Mississippi
to the south, and Arkansas
Arkansas
and Missouri
Missouri
to the west. The Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
dominate the eastern part of the state, and the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
forms the state's western border. Nashville is the state's capital and largest city, with a population of 660,388
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Pierre François De Rigaud, Marquis De Vaudreuil-Cavagnal
Pierre de Rigaud de Vaudreuil de Cavagnial, Marquis de Vaudreuil (22 November 1698 – 4 August 1778[1]) was a Canadian-born colonial governor of Canada (New France)
Canada (New France)
in North America. He was governor of French Louisiana
French Louisiana
(1743–1753) and in 1755 became the last Governor-General
Governor-General
of New France. In 1759 and 1760 the British conquered the colony in the Seven Years' War
Seven Years' War
(known in the United States
United States
as the French and Indian War).Contents1 Life and work 2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife and work[edit] He was born to the Governor-General
Governor-General
of New France, Philippe de Rigaud Vaudreuil and his wife Louise-Élisabeth, daughter of Pierre de Joybert de Soulanges et de Marson, in Quebec
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Pierre-Joseph Céloron De Blainville
Pierre-Joseph Céloron de Blainville (29 December 1693, Montreal—14 April 1759, Montreal) — also known as Celeron de Bienville (or Céleron, or Céloron, etc.) — was a French Canadian Officer of Marine. In 1739 and '40 he led a detachment to Louisiana to fight the Chickasaw in the abortive Chickasaw Campaign of 1739. In 1749 he led the 'Lead Plate Expedition' to advance France's territorial claim on the Ohio Valley.Contents1 Biography1.1 The 'Lead Plate' Expedition 1.2 Last years and death2 Family 3 See also 4 Sources 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Pierre Joseph Céloron de Blainville was born at Montreal on 29 December 1693. He was the son of Jean-Baptiste Céloron de Blainville and Hélène Picoté de Belestre. Céloron entered military service in 1713
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Charles III Le Moyne
Charles III Le Moyne (Longueuil, (18 October 1687 – 17 January 1755) was the second baron de Longueuil. He succeeded his father Charles le Moyne de Longueuil, Baron de Longueuil in 1729. He became Governor of Montreal, and administrator by interim of New France[1]Contents1 Bibliography 2 See also2.1 Sources 2.2 Notes and references3 External linksBibliography[edit] Charles III Le Moyne was the son of Charles le Moyne de Longueuil, Baron de Longueuil, who was General Administrator for New France by interim. He named his son Commandant of Fort Niagara on April 28, 1726. In June 1733, Charles III was named Major of the military troops of the Government of Montreal; then in 1739, the Governor-General of New France, Marquis de Beauharnois, sent him to Louisiana, in order to help the Governor of Louisiana Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville against the native Chicachas
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Canada (New France)
Canada
Canada
was a French colony within New France
New France
first claimed in the name of the King of France in 1535 during the second voyage of Jacques Cartier.[1][2][3][4] The word "Canada" at this point referred to the territory along the Saint Lawrence River,[5] then known as the Canada river, from Grosse Island in the east to a point between Quebec
Quebec
and Three Rivers,[6] although this territory had greatly expanded by 1600. French explorations continued "unto the Countreys of Canada, Hochelaga, and Saguenay"[7] before any permanent settlements were established
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Memphis, Tennessee
Memphis is a city located along the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Tennessee. With an estimated 2016 population of 652,717,[5] it is the cultural and economic center of West Tennessee
Tennessee
and the greater Mid-South region that includes portions of neighborhing Arkansas
Arkansas
and Mississippi. Memphis is the seat of Shelby County, the most populous county in Tennessee
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Green Corn Ceremony
The Green Corn
Corn
Ceremony (Busk) is an annual ceremony practiced among various Native American peoples associated with the beginning of the yearly corn harvest. Busk is a term given to the ceremony by white traders, the word being a corruption of the Creek word puskita for "a fast".[1] These ceremonies have been documented ethnographically throughout the North American Eastern Woodlands and Southeastern tribes.[2] Historically, it involved a first fruits rite in which the community would sacrifice the first of the green corn to ensure the rest of the crop would be successful. These Green Corn
Corn
festivals were practiced widely throughout southern North America by many tribes evidenced in the Mississippian people and throughout the Mississippian Ideological Interaction Sphere. Green Corn
Corn
festivals are still held today by many different Southeastern Woodland tribes
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Tupelo, Mississippi
Tupelo
Tupelo
/ˈtuːpəloʊ/ is the county seat and the largest city of Lee County, Mississippi, United States. The seventh-largest city in the state, it is situated in Northeast Mississippi, between Memphis, Tennessee, and Birmingham, Alabama. It is accessed by Interstate 22. As of the 2010 census, the population was 34,546, with the surrounding counties of Lee, Pontotoc and Itawamba supporting a population of 139,671 Tupelo
Tupelo
was the first city to gain an electrical power grid under President Franklin D
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Fort De Chartres
Fort de Chartres
Fort de Chartres
was a French fortification first built in 1720 on the east bank of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
in present-day Illinois, it was used as an administrative center for the province. Due generally to river floods, the fort was rebuilt twice, the last time in limestone in the 1750s in the era of French colonial control over Louisiana and the Illinois
Illinois
Country. A partial reconstruction exists of the third and last fort, which was built of local limestone shortly before the end of French rule in the Midwest. The site is now preserved as an Illinois
Illinois
state park and is four miles (6 km) west of Prairie du Rocher in Randolph County, Illinois. It is south of St. Louis, Missouri
St. Louis, Missouri
in the floodplain area that became known as the American Bottom
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Tombigbee River
The Tombigbee River
Tombigbee River
is a tributary of the Mobile River, approximately 200 mi (325 km) long, in the U.S. states
U.S. states
of Mississippi
Mississippi
and Alabama. Together with the Alabama, it merges to form the short Mobile River before the latter empties into Mobile Bay
Mobile Bay
on the Gulf of Mexico. The Tombigbee watershed encompasses much of the rural coastal plain of western Alabama
Alabama
and northeastern Mississippi, flowing generally southward
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Mississippi River
The Mississippi
Mississippi
River
River
is the chief river of the second-largest drainage system on the North American continent, second only to the Hudson Bay
Hudson Bay
drainage system.[13][14] The stream is entirely within the United States
United States
(although its drainage basin reaches into Canada), its source is in northern Minnesota
Minnesota
and it flows generally south for 2,320 miles (3,730 km)[14] to the Mississippi
Mississippi
River
River
Delta in the Gulf of Mexico. With its many tributaries, the Mississippi's watershed drains all or parts of 31 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces between the Rocky and Appalachian Mountains. The Mississippi
Mississippi
ranks as the fourth-longest and fifteenth-largest river in the world by discharge
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Mobile, Alabama
Mobile (/moʊˈbiːl/ moh-BEEL; French pronunciation: ​[mɔ.bil]) is the county seat of Mobile County, Alabama, United States. The population within the city limits was 195,111 as of the 2010 United States Census,[10] making it the third most populous city in Alabama, the most populous in Mobile County, and the largest municipality on the Gulf Coast between New Orleans, Louisiana, and St
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Iroquois
The Iroquois
Iroquois
(/ˈɪrəkwɔɪ/ or /ˈɪrəkwɑː/) or Haudenosaunee (/ˈhoʊdənoʊˈʃoʊni/)[1] are a historically powerful northeast Native American confederacy. They were known during the colonial years to the French as the " Iroquois
Iroquois
League", and later as the "Iroquois Confederacy", and to the English as the "Five Nations" (before 1722), and later as the "Six Nations", comprising the Mohawk, Onondaga, Oneida, Cayuga, Seneca, and Tuscarora peoples. The Iroquois
Iroquois
have absorbed many other peoples into their cultures as a result of warfare, adoption of captives, and by offering shelter to displaced peoples. The historic Erie, Susquehannock, Wyandot (Huron), and St. Lawrence Iroquoians, all independent peoples, spoke Iroquoian
Iroquoian
languages
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