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Chicago VI
Chicago VI is the fifth studio album by American rock band Chicago and was released in 1973. It is the first album to feature percussionist Laudir de Oliveira, who would become a full-fledged member of the band for Chicago VIII.Contents1 Background 2 Track listing 3 Personnel3.1 Chicago 3.2 Additional personnel 3.3 Production4 Charts4.1 Weekly charts 4.2 Singles5 Certifications 6 ReferencesBackground[edit] After having recorded all of Chicago's first five albums in New York City (except for parts of the second album recorded at CBS in Los Angeles), producer James William Guercio had his own Caribou Studios built in Nederland, Colorado
Nederland, Colorado
during 1972. It was finished in time for the band to record their sixth album the following February
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Album
An album is a collection of audio recordings issued as a single item on CD, record, audio tape or another medium. Albums of recorded music were developed in the early 20th century, first as books of individual 78rpm records, then from 1948 as vinyl LP records played at ​33 1⁄3 rpm. Vinyl LPs are still issued, though in the 21st-century album sales have mostly focused on compact disc (CD) and MP3
MP3
formats. However, vinyl sales have been on the rise in recent years.[1] The audio cassette was a format used alongside vinyl from the 1970s into the first decade of the 2000s. An album may be recorded in a recording studio (fixed or mobile), in a concert venue, at home, in the field, or a mix of places. The time frame for completely recording an album varies between a few hours and several years. This process usually requires several takes with different parts recorded separately, and then brought or "mixed" together
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Acoustic Piano
The piano is an acoustic, stringed musical instrument invented in Italy by Bartolomeo Cristofori around the year 1700 (the exact year is uncertain), in which the strings are struck by hammers. It is played using a keyboard,[1] which is a row of keys (small levers) that the performer presses down or strikes with the fingers and thumbs of both hands to cause the hammers to strike the strings. The word piano is a shortened form of pianoforte, the Italian term for the early 1700s versions of the instrument, which in turn derives from gravicembalo col piano e forte[2] and fortepiano. The Italian musical terms piano and forte indicate "soft" and "loud" respectively,[3] in this context referring to the variations in volume (i.e., loudness) produced in response to a pianist's touch or pressure on the keys: the greater the velocity of a key press, the greater the force of the hammer hitting the strings, and the louder the sound of the note produced and the stronger the attack
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Fender Rhodes
The Rhodes piano
Rhodes piano
(also known as the Fender Rhodes piano
Rhodes piano
or simply Fender Rhodes or Rhodes) is an electric piano invented by Harold Rhodes, which became particularly popular throughout the 1970s. Like a piano, it generates sound using keys and hammers, but instead of strings, the hammers strike thin metal tines, which are then amplified via an electromagnetic pickup which is plugged into an external keyboard amplifier and speaker. The instrument evolved from Rhodes' attempt to manufacture pianos to teach recovering soldiers during World War II
World War II
under a strict budget, and development continued throughout the 1940s and 1950s. Fender started marketing the Piano
Piano
Bass, a cut-down version of the piano, but the full-size instrument did not appear until after the sale to CBS
CBS
in 1965
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Wurlitzer Electric Piano
The Wurlitzer
Wurlitzer
electronic piano, commonly called the Wurlitzer
Wurlitzer
electric piano was an electric piano manufactured and marketed by Wurlitzer from the mid-1950s to the early 1980s. The sound is generated by striking a metal reed with a hammer, which induces an electric current in a pickup; although conceptually similar to the Rhodes piano, the sound is different. Wurlitzer
Wurlitzer
manufactured several different models of electric pianos, including console models with built-in frames, and standalone stage models with chrome legs
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Los Angeles
Los AngelesCSA Los Angeles-Long BeachMSA Los Angeles-Long Beach-AnaheimPueblo September 4, 1781[3]City status May 23, 1835[4]Incorporated April 4, 1850[5]Named for Our Lady, Queen of the AngelsGovernment • Type Mayor-Council-Commission[6] • Body Los Angeles
Los Angeles
City Council • Mayor Eric Garcetti[7] • City Attorney Mike Feuer[7] • City Controller Ron Galperin[7]Area[8] • City in California 502.76 sq m
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Clavinet
The Clavinet
Clavinet
is an electrically amplified clavichord that was invented by Ernst Zacharias and manufactured by the Hohner
Hohner
company of Trossingen, West Germany
West Germany
from 1964 to the early 1980s
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Hammond Organ
The Hammond organ
Hammond organ
is an electric organ, invented by Laurens Hammond and John M. Hanert[6] and first manufactured in 1935.[7] Various models have been produced, most of which use sliding drawbars to specify a variety of sounds. Until 1975, Hammond organs generated sound by creating an electric current from rotating a metal tonewheel near an electromagnetic pickup, and then strengthening the signal with an amplifier so it can drive a speaker cabinet. Around two million Hammond organs have been manufactured. The organ is commonly used with, and associated with, the Leslie speaker. The organ was originally marketed and sold by the Hammond Organ Company to churches as a lower-cost alternative to the wind-driven pipe organ, or instead of a piano. It quickly became popular with professional jazz musicians in organ trios, a small group centered on the Hammond organ
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Slide Guitar
Slide guitar
Slide guitar
is a particular technique for playing the guitar that is often used in blues-style music. The technique involves placing an object against the strings while playing to create glissando effects and deep vibratos that make the music emotionally expressive. It typically involves playing the guitar in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the use of a tubular "slide" fitted on one of the guitarist's fingers. The slide may be a metal or glass tube like the neck of a bottle. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The strings are typically plucked while the slide is moved over the strings to change the pitch
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Harmonica
The harmonica, also known as a French harp or mouth organ, is a free reed wind instrument used worldwide in many musical genres, notably in blues, American folk music, classical music, jazz, country, and rock and roll. There are many types of harmonica, including diatonic, chromatic, tremolo, octave, orchestral, and bass versions. A harmonica is played by using the mouth (lips and tongue) to direct air into or out of one or more holes along a mouthpiece. Behind each hole is a chamber containing at least one reed. A harmonica reed is a flat elongated spring typically made of brass, stainless steel, or bronze, which is secured at one end over a slot that serves as an airway. When the free end is made to vibrate by the player's air, it alternately blocks and unblocks the airway to produce sound. Reeds are pre-tuned to individual pitches. Tuning may involve changing a reeds length, the weight near its free end, or the stiffness near its fixed end
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Joe Gastwirt
Joe Gastwirt is an audio engineer,[1][2] known for digitally remastering hundreds of CDs for famous artists, including the Grateful Dead, Tom Petty, Helen Reddy, Jimi Hendrix,[3] Crosby, Stills, and Nash,[4], The Blues Brothers, and Yes.[5][6] His remasters have been critically acclaimed.[7] References[edit]^ http://cloudsurfing.gdhour.com/archives/tag/joe-gastwirt ^ http://mixonline.com/mag/audio_oceanview_mastering/ ^ https://www.rollingstone.com/news/story/5924999/have_you_reexperienced ^ http://www.answers.com/topic/carry-on-rock-album-5 ^ http://music.barnesandnoble.com/Artist/Joe-Gastwirt/c/127727 ^ http://gastwirtmastering.com/db_files/credit.php?ALL=0&release_date=1996 ^ http://www.stevehoffman.tv/forums/archive/index.php/t-6060.htmlAuthority controlMusicBrainz: 5d7cb09d-ea27-44
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Rhino Records
Rhino Entertainment
Rhino Entertainment
Company is an American specialty record label and production company founded in 1978. It is currently the catalog division for Warner Music Group. Its current CEO is Kevin Gore.[1]Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Founded in 1978,[2] Rhino was originally a novelty and reissue label during the 1970s and 1980s. It released compilation albums of pop, rock & roll, and rhythm & blues successes from the 1950s through the 1980s, as well as novelty-song LPs (compiled in-house or by Dr. Demento) and retrospectives of famous comedy performers, including Richard Pryor, Stan Freberg, Tom Lehrer, and Spike Jones. Rhino started as a record shop on Westwood Boulevard, Los Angeles, in 1973, run by Richard Foos, and became a record distributor five years later[3][citation needed] thanks to the effort of then-store manager Harold Bronson
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Al Green
Albert Leornes Greene[1] (born April 13, 1946), often known as The Reverend Al Green, is an American singer, songwriter and record producer, best known for recording a series of soul hit singles in the early 1970s, including "Take Me to the River", "Tired of Being Alone", "I'm Still in Love with You", "Love and Happiness", and his signature song, "Let's Stay Together".[2] Inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995, Green was referred to on the museum's site as being "one of the most gifted purveyors of soul music".[2] He has also been referred to as "The Last of the Great Soul Singers".[3] Green was included in the Rolling Stone
Rolling Stone
list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time, ranking at No
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Guitars
The guitar is a fretted musical instrument that usually has six strings.[1] The sound is projected either acoustically, using a hollow wooden or plastic and wood box (for an acoustic guitar), or through electrical amplifier and a speaker (for an electric guitar). It is typically played by strumming or plucking the strings with the fingers, thumb or fingernails of the right hand or with a pick while fretting (or pressing against the frets) the strings with the fingers of the left hand. The guitar is a type of chordophone, traditionally constructed from wood and strung with either gut, nylon or steel strings and distinguished from other chordophones by its construction and tuning
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Reissue
In the music industry, a reissue (also re-release, repackage, or re-edition) is the release of an album or single which has been released at least once before, sometimes with alterations or additions.Contents1 Reasons for reissue1.1 New audio formats 1.2 Budget records 1.3 New ownership 1.4 Strong or weak sales 1.5 Special, Limited and Commemorative Editions 1.6 Track controversy and revisionism2 Alterations 3 Reissues and certification 4 Reissue
Reissue
labels 5 ReferencesReasons for reissue[edit] New audio formats[edit] Recordings originally released in an audio format that has become technologically or commercially obsolete are reissued in new formats. For example, thousands of original vinyl albums have been reissued on CDs since introduction of that format in the early 1980s
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