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Chevrolet TrailBlazer
The Chevrolet
Chevrolet
TrailBlazer is a mid-size sport utility vehicle that has been produced by General Motors
General Motors
since 2002.Contents1 Blazer trim line (1999–2001) 2 First generation (2002–2009)2.1 Engines2.1.1 EXT2.2 SS 2.3 Safety 2.4 Yearly American sales 2.5 Discontinuation 2.6 Recall3 Second generation (2012–present)3.1 Holden Colorado
Holden Colorado
74 Future plans 5 Engines 6 References 7 External linksBlazer trim line (1999–2001)[edit]1999–2001 Chevrolet
Chevrolet
TrailBlazerThe TrailBlazer nameplate was introduced in 1999 as an upscale trim line of the Blazer. In 2002, the TrailBlazer turned into a separate model
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General Motors
General Motors
General Motors
Company,[1] commonly abbreviated as GM, is an American multinational corporation headquartered in Detroit
Detroit
that designs, manufactures, markets, and distributes vehicles and vehicle parts, and sells financial services. With global headquarters in Detroit's Renaissance Center, GM manufactures cars and trucks in 35 countries. In 2008, 8.35 million[6] GM cars and trucks were sold globally under various brands. GM reached the milestone of selling 10 million vehicles in 2016.[7] Current auto brands are Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Holden, and Wuling. Former GM automotive brands include Daewoo, McLaughlin, Oakland, Oldsmobile, Pontiac, Hummer, Saab, Saturn, as well as Vauxhall and Opel, which were bought by Groupe PSA
Groupe PSA
in 2017. The company was founded by William C. Durant
William C. Durant
on September 16, 1908 as a holding company
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Wheelbase
In both road and rail vehicles, the wheelbase is the distance between the centers of the front and rear wheels. For road vehicles with more than two axles (e.g. some trucks), the wheelbase is defined as the distance between the steering (front) axle and the centerpoint of the driving axle group. In the case of a tri-axle truck, the wheelbase would be the distance between the steering axle and a point midway between the two rear axles. Wheelbase
Wheelbase
(measured between rotational centers of wheels)Contents1 Vehicles1.1 Varying wheelbases within nameplate 1.2 Bikes 1.3 Skateboards2 Rail 3 See also 4 ReferencesVehicles[edit] The wheelbase of a vehicle equals the distance between its front and rear wheels. At equilibrium, the total torque of the forces acting on a vehicle is zero
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Buick Rainier
The Buick
Buick
Rainier is a midsize luxury SUV
SUV
that was produced by General Motors from 2003 to 2007. It replaced the Oldsmobile Bravada.Contents1 History 2 Engines 3 2004 model 4 2005 model 5 2006 model 6 2007 model 7 Sales 8 Recall 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] The Rainier was introduced on July 28, 2003 for the 2004 model year as a replacement for the Oldsmobile Bravada. It was only available in a 5-passenger configuration, yet was one of only five GMT360
GMT360
SUVs to offer a V8 engine
V8 engine
in this configuration along with the GMC Envoy Denali, Isuzu Ascender
Isuzu Ascender
EXT, Saab 9-7X
Saab 9-7X
5.3i and Aero, and Chevrolet TrailBlazer LT (Optional) and SS. Both rear and all-wheel drive models were offered. An upscale CXL trim added a better Bose stereo and XM Satellite Radio
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GMC Envoy
Front engine, rear-wheel drive / four-wheel drive 4.3 vortec 98- 00Platform GMT330 (1998-2000) GMT360 GMT370 (Envoy XL) GMT305 (Envoy XUV)Related Buick Rainier Chevrolet SSR Chevrolet TrailBlazer Isuzu Ascender Oldsmobile Bravada Saab 9-7XPowertrainEngine 4.2 L LL8 I6 5.3 L LM4 V8Transmission 4-speed automaticDimensionsWheelbase 113.0 in (2,870 mm) 129.0 in (3,277 mm) (XL/XUV)Length 191.6 in (4,867 mm) 207.6 in (5,273 mm) (XL) 208.4 in (5,293 mm) (XUV)Width 74.7 in (1,897 mm)Height 71.9 in (1,826 mm) 75.5 in (1,918 mm) (XL) 77.0 in (1,956 mm) (XUV)ChronologyPredecessor GMC JimmySuccessor GMC Terrain GMC Acadia
GMC Acadia
(Envoy XL)The GMC Envoy
GMC Envoy
is a mid-size SUV
SUV
that was produced by General Motors. It was introduced for the 1998 model year
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Oldsmobile Bravada
The Oldsmobile
Oldsmobile
Bravada was a mid-size SUV made by General Motors. Two different vehicles bore the Bravada name: The first and second-generation models built on the GMT330 platform, and the third generation 2002 to 2004 on the GMT360
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Saab 9-7X
The Saab 9-7X
Saab 9-7X
is a midsize luxury SUV
SUV
that was built by General Motors. The Saab 9-7X
Saab 9-7X
was introduced in 2004 for the 2005 model year as a replacement for the Oldsmobile Bravada. The Saab 9-7X
Saab 9-7X
was first revealed at the 2004 New York International Auto Show.Contents1 Information and Vehicle Details1.1 Yearly production2 Markets 3 Recall 4 References 5 External linksInformation and Vehicle Details[edit] The Saab 9-7X
Saab 9-7X
was introduced in 2004 for the 2005 model year and was made by General Motors, and the 9-7X was also built on the GMT360 platform, which is the same platform that the Chevrolet TrailBlazer, GMC Envoy, Isuzu Ascender, Oldsmobile Bravada, and Buick Rainier
Buick Rainier
were all built on. The 9-7X was Saab's first ever SUV
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Engine
An engine or motor is a machine designed to convert one form of energy into mechanical energy.[1][2] Heat
Heat
engines burn a fuel to create heat which is then used to do work. Electric motors convert electrical energy into mechanical motion; pneumatic motors use compressed air; and clockwork motors in wind-up toys use elastic energy
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Straight-6
The straight-six engine or inline-six engine (often abbreviated I6 or L6) is an internal combustion engine with the cylinders mounted in a straight line along the crankcase with all the pistons driving a common crankshaft (straight engine). The bank of cylinders may be oriented at any angle, and where the bank is inclined to the vertical, the engine is sometimes called a slant-six
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V8 Engine
A V8 engine
V8 engine
is an eight-cylinder V configuration engine with the cylinders mounted on the crankcase in two sets (or banks) of four, with all eight pistons driving a common crankshaft.[1] Most banks are set at a right angle (90°) to each other, some at a narrower angle, with 45°, 60°, and 72° most common. In its simplest form, the V8 is basically two parallel inline-four engines sharing a common crankshaft. However, this simple configuration, with a flat- or single-plane crankshaft, has the same secondary dynamic imbalance problems as two straight-4s, resulting in vibrations in large engine displacements.[2] Since the 1920s, most V8s have used the somewhat more complex crossplane crankshaft with heavy counterweights to eliminate the vibrations
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Transmission (mechanics)
A transmission is a machine in a power transmission system, which provides controlled application of the power. Often the term transmission refers simply to the gearbox that uses gears and gear trains to provide speed and torque conversions from a rotating power source to another device.[1][2] In British English, the term transmission refers to the whole drivetrain, including clutch, gearbox, prop shaft (for rear-wheel drive), differential, and final drive shafts. In American English, however, the term refers more specifically to the gearbox alone, and detailed usage differs.[note 1] The most common use is in motor vehicles, where the transmission adapts the output of the internal combustion engine to the drive wheels. Such engines need to operate at a relatively high rotational speed, which is inappropriate for starting, stopping, and slower travel. The transmission reduces the higher engine speed to the slower wheel speed, increasing torque in the process
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Automatic Transmission
An automatic transmission, also called auto, self-shifting transmission, n-speed automatic (where n is its number of forward gear ratios), or AT, is a type of motor vehicle transmission that can automatically change gear ratios as the vehicle moves, freeing the driver from having to shift gears manually. Like other transmission systems on vehicles, it allows an internal combustion engine, best suited to run at a relatively high rotational speed, to provide a range of speed and torque outputs necessary for vehicular travel. The number of forward gear ratios is often expressed for manual transmissions as well (e.g., 6-speed manual). The most popular form found in automobiles is the hydraulic automatic transmission. Similar but larger devices are also used for heavy-duty commercial and industrial vehicles and equipment. This system uses a fluid coupling in place of a friction clutch, and accomplishes gear changes by hydraulically locking and unlocking a system of planetary gears
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All Wheel Drive
An all-wheel drive vehicle (AWD vehicle) is one with a powertrain capable of providing power to all its wheels, whether full-time or on-demand. The most common forms of all-wheel drive are: 4×4
4×4
(also, four-wheel drive and 4WD) Reflecting two axles with both wheels on each capable of being powered. 6×6
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Chevrolet Blazer
Chevrolet Blazer
Chevrolet Blazer
(and GMC Jimmy) can refer to one of several Truck models from General Motors:The full-size Chevrolet K5 Blazer, based on the C/K pickup chassis and built from 1969 to 1999 (renamed to Tahoe in 1995 for the 2-door model) The compact and mid-size Chevrolet S-10 Blazer, based on the S-10 pickup and built from 1983 to 2005 The Chevrolet TrailBlazer, originally a trim package on the S-10 Blazer until 2002, when it became its own, larger model The Chevrolet Tahoe, sold in Argentina, Brazil, Ecuador and Venezuela under the Grand Blazer name from 1990 to 2000 The Ch
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Independent Front Suspension
Independent suspension
Independent suspension
is a broad term for any automobile suspension system that allows each wheel on the same axle to move vertically (i.e. reacting to a bump in the road) independently of the others. This is contrasted with a beam axle or deDion axle system in which the wheels are linked – movement on one side affects the wheel on the other side. "Independent" refers to the motion or path of movement of the wheels or suspension. It is common for the left and right sides of the suspension to be connected with anti-roll bars or other such mechanisms. The anti-roll bar ties the left and right suspension spring rates together but does not tie their motion together. Most modern vehicles have independent front suspension (IFS). Many vehicles also have an independent rear suspension (IRS). IRS, as the name implies, has the rear wheels independently sprung
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Active Fuel Management
Active Fuel Management (formerly known as displacement on demand (DoD)) is a trademarked name for the automobile variable displacement technology from General Motors. It allows a V6 or V8 engine
V8 engine
to "turn off" half of the cylinders under light-load conditions to improve fuel economy. Estimated performance on EPA tests show a 5.5%-7.5% improvement in fuel economy.[1] GM's current Active Fuel Management technology uses a solenoid to deactivate the lifters on selected cylinders of a pushrod V-layout engine.Contents1 Background 2 Pumping loss 3 Operation 4 Second generation 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBackground[edit] High-powered multi-cylinder internal combustion engines may be necessary to satisfy driver demands for quick acceleration and/or heavy towing capacity, but during daily use they are generally operated at power settings of less than 25%
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