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Chernobylite
Chernobylite
Chernobylite
is a technogenic compound, a crystalline zirconium silicate with a high (up to 10%) content of uranium as a solid solution. It was discovered in the corium produced in the Chernobyl
Chernobyl
accident, a lava-like glassy material formed in the nuclear meltdown of reactor core 4.[1][2][3] Chernobylite
Chernobylite
is highly radioactive due to its high uranium content and contamination by fission products. References[edit]^ United States. Joint Publications Research Service; United States. Foreign Broadcast Information Service (1991). USSR report: Chemistry. Joint Publications Research Service. Retrieved 20 July 2012.  ^ Richard Francis Mould (1 May 2000). Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Record: The Definitive History of the Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Catastrophe. CRC Press. pp. 128–. ISBN 978-0-7503-0670-6
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Crystalline
A crystal or crystalline solid is a solid material whose constituents (such as atoms, molecules, or ions) are arranged in a highly ordered microscopic structure, forming a crystal lattice that extends in all directions.[1][2] In addition, macroscopic single crystals are usually identifiable by their geometrical shape, consisting of flat faces with specific, characteristic orientations. The scientific study of crystals and crystal formation is known as crystallography. The process of crystal formation via mechanisms of crystal growth is called crystallization or solidification. The word crystal derives from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
word κρύσταλλος (krustallos), meaning both "ice" and "rock crystal",[3] from κρύος (kruos), "icy cold, frost".[4][5] Examples of large crystals include snowflakes, diamonds, and table salt. Most inorganic solids are not crystals but polycrystals, i.e. many microscopic crystals fused together into a single solid
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Uranium
Uranium
Uranium
is a chemical element with symbol U and atomic number 92. It is a silvery-white metal in the actinide series of the periodic table. A uranium atom has 92 protons and 92 electrons, of which 6 are valence electrons. Uranium
Uranium
is weakly radioactive because all isotopes of uranium are unstable, with half-lives varying between 159,200 years and 4.5 billion years. The most common isotopes in natural uranium are uranium-238 (which has 146 neutrons and accounts for over 99%) and uranium-235 (which has 143 neutrons). Uranium
Uranium
has the highest atomic weight of the primordially occurring elements. Its density is about 70% higher than that of lead, and slightly lower than that of gold or tungsten
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Lava
Lava
Lava
is molten rock generated by geothermal energy and expelled through fractures in planetary crust or in an eruption, usually at temperatures from 700 to 1,200 °C (1,292 to 2,192 °F). The resulting structures after solidification and cooling are also sometimes described as lava. The molten rock is formed in the interior of some planets, including Earth, and some of their satellites, though such material located below the crust is referred to by other terms. A lava flow is a moving outpouring of lava created during a non-explosive effusive eruption. When it has stopped moving, lava solidifies to form igneous rock. The term lava flow is commonly shortened to lava
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Glass
Glass
Glass
is a non-crystalline amorphous solid that is often transparent and has widespread practical, technological, and decorative usage in, for example, window panes, tableware, and optoelectronics. The most familiar, and historically the oldest, types of glass are "silicate glasses" based on the chemical compound silica (silicon dioxide, or quartz), the primary constituent of sand. The term glass, in popular usage, is often used to refer only to this type of material, which is familiar from use as window glass and in glass bottles
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Radioactive
Radioactive
Radioactive
decay (also known as nuclear decay or radioactivity) is the process by which an unstable atomic nucleus loses energy (in terms of mass in its rest frame) by emitting radiation, such as an alpha particle, beta particle with neutrino or only a neutrino in the case of electron capture, gamma ray, or electron in the case of internal conversion. A material containing such unstable nuclei is considered radioactive. Certain highly excited short-lived nuclear states can decay through neutron emission, or more rarely, proton emission. Radioactive
Radioactive
decay is a stochastic (i.e. random) process at the level of single atoms, in that, according to quantum theory, it is impossible to predict when a particular atom will decay,[1][2][3] regardless of how long the atom has existed
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Fission Products
Nuclear fission
Nuclear fission
products are the atomic fragments left after a large atomic nucleus undergoes nuclear fission. Typically, a large nucleus like that of uranium fissions by splitting into two smaller nuclei, along with a few neutrons, the release of heat energy (kinetic energy of the nuclei), and gamma rays. The two smaller nuclei are the fission products. (See also Fission products (by element)). About 0.2% to 0.4% of fissions are ternary fissions, producing a third light nucleus such as helium-4 (90%) or tritium (7%). The fission products themselves are usually unstable and therefore radioactive; due to being relatively neutron-rich for their atomic number, many of them quickly undergo beta decay. This releases additional energy in the form of beta particles, antineutrinos, and gamma rays
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Cultural Impact Of The Chernobyl Disaster
This article is about the Chernobyl disaster, which occurred on April 26, 1986, and was the world's largest nuclear accident.Contents1 Literature 2 Music 3 Fiction films 4 Television series 5 Documentary films 6 Painting 7 Video games 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksLiterature[edit]Markiyan Kamysh's novel about Chernobyl illegal trips "A Stroll to the Zone". In France the novel has been released under the title “La Zone” and been welcomed with great warmth by French critics. Cult French magazine Le Nouvel Observateur has called it “Stunning book”[1]
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Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant
The Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Nuclear Power Plant or Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Nuclear Power Station (Ukrainian: Чорнобильська атомна електростанція, Russian: Чернобыльская АЭС) is a decommissioned nuclear power station near the city of Pripyat, Ukraine, 14.5 km (9.0 mi) northwest of the city of Chornobyl, 16 km (9.9 mi) from the Belarus– Ukraine
Ukraine
border, and about 110 km (68 mi) north of Kiev. Reactor No. 4 was the site of the Chernobyl disaster
Chernobyl disaster
in 1986 and the power plant is now within a large restricted area known as the Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Exclusion Zone. Both the zone and the former power plant are administered by the State Agency of Ukraine
Ukraine
of the Exclusion Zone (Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources)
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Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Sarcophagus
The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant
Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant
sarcophagus or Shelter Object (Ukrainian: Об'єкт "Укриття") is a massive steel and concrete structure covering the nuclear reactor No. 4 building of the Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Nuclear Power Plant. It was designed to limit radioactive contamination of the environment following the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, by encasing the most dangerous area and protecting it from climate exposure.[1][2] It is located within a large restricted area known as the Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Exclusion Zone
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Chernobyl New Safe Confinement
Coordinates: 51°23′22″N 30°05′36″E / 51.389319°N 30.093205°E / 51.389319; 30.093205Chernobyl New Safe ConfinementНовий чорнобильський саркофагThe New Safe Confinement at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in its final position over the damaged Reactor 4 in October 2017General informationStatus Under construction[1]Type Containment structureArchitectural style Arch-shaped steel structureTown or city PripyatCountry UkraineConstruction started September 2010Cost €1.5 billionClient Government of UkraineHeight 92.5 metres (303.5 ft)DimensionsOther dimensions external span 270 metres (885.83 ft), length 150 metres (492.1 ft)Design and constructionMain contractor Novarka with 50/50 partners Vinci Construction Grands Projets and Bouygues Travaux PublicsThe New Safe Confinement (NSC or New Shelter) is a structure built to contain the remains of the No
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Slavutych
Slavutych
Slavutych
(Ukrainian: Славу́тич) is a city in northern Ukraine, purposely built for the evacuated personnel of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant after the 1986 disaster that occurred near the city of Pripyat. Geographically located within the Ripky Raion, Chernihiv
Chernihiv
Oblast, Slavutych
Slavutych
is administratively subordinated to the Kiev Oblast
Kiev Oblast
as a town of oblast significance. As of 2014, the city has a population of 25,112 inhabitants.[1]Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Infrastructures 4 Demographics 5 Transport 6 Personalities 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksGeography[edit]Transportation connection between Slavutych
Slavutych
and Pripyat
Pripyat
(map is in German) Ripky Raion
Ripky Raion
within Chernihiv
Chernihiv
Oblast
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Dytiatky
Dytiatky
Dytiatky
(Ukrainian: Дитятки, Russian: Дитятки, also spelled Dytyatky or Dityatki) is a Ukrainian village in the Ivankiv Raion, Kiev
Kiev
Oblast. As of 2001, it had a population of 571.[1]Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The village was first mentioned in 1864. On 25 August 1941, it was occupied by Nazi German troops, and the population that left the occupied area, resisted to them
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Ukrainian National Chornobyl Museum
The Ukrainian National Chornobyl Museum (Ukrainian: Український національний музей "Чорнобиль", Ukrayins'kyy natsional'nyy muzey "Chornobyl'") is a history museum in Kiev, Ukraine, dedicated to the 1986 Chernobyl disaster and its consequences
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