HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Chavín Culture
The Chavín culture
Chavín culture
is an extinct, prehistoric civilization, named for Chavín de Huantar, the principal archaeological site at which its artifacts have been found. The culture developed in the northern Andean highlands of Peru
Peru
from 900 BCE to 200 BCE. It extended its influence to other civilizations along the coast.[1][2] The Chavín people (whose name for themselves is unknown) were located in the Mosna Valley where the Mosna and Huachecsa rivers merge. This area is 3,150 metres (10,330 ft) above sea level and encompasses the quechua, suni, and puna life zones.[3] In the periodization of pre-Columbian Peru
Peru
the Chavín is the main culture of the Early Horizon period in highland Peru. The best-known archaeological site for the Chavín culture
Chavín culture
is Chavín de Huantar, located in the Andean highlands of the present-day Ancash Region
[...More...]

"Chavín Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

C3 Carbon Fixation
C3 carbon fixation
C3 carbon fixation
is one of three metabolic pathways for carbon fixation in photosynthesis, along with C4 and CAM. This process converts carbon dioxide and ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP, a 5-carbon sugar) into 3-phosphoglycerate
3-phosphoglycerate
through the following reaction:CO2 + H2O + RuBP
RuBP
→ (2) 3-phosphoglycerateThis reaction occurs in all plants as the first step of the Calvin–Benson cycle. In C4 plants, carbon dioxide is drawn out of malate and into this reaction rather than directly from the air.Cross section of a C3 plant, specifically of an Arabidopsis thaliana leaf. Vascular bundles shown
[...More...]

"C3 Carbon Fixation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

3D Scanner
A 3D scanner
3D scanner
is a device that analyses a real-world object or environment to collect data on its shape and possibly its appearance (e.g. colour). The collected data can then be used to construct digital three-dimensional models. Many different technologies can be used to build these 3D-scanning devices; each technology comes with its own limitations, advantages and costs. Many limitations in the kind of objects that can be digitised are still present, for example, optical technology, may encounter many difficulties with shiny, mirroring or transparent objects. For example, industrial computed tomography scanning and structured-light 3D scanners can be used to construct digital 3D models, without destructive testing. Collected 3D data is useful for a wide variety of applications. These devices are used extensively by the entertainment industry in the production of movies and video games, including virtual reality
[...More...]

"3D Scanner" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Culture
Culture
Culture
(/ˈkʌltʃər/) is the social behavior and norms found in human societies. Culture
Culture
is considered a central concept in anthropology, encompassing the range of phenomena that are transmitted through social learning in human societies. Some aspects of human behavior, social practices such as culture, expressive forms such as art, music, dance, ritual, religion, and technologies such as tool usage, cooking, shelter, and clothing are said to be cultural universals, found in all human societies
[...More...]

"Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Quinoa
Quinoa
Quinoa
( Chenopodium
Chenopodium
quinoa; (/ˈkiːnwɑː/ or /kɪˈnoʊ.ə/, from Quechua kinwa or kinuwa)[2] is a flowering plant in the amaranth family. It is a herbaceous annual plant grown as a grain crop primarily for its edible seeds. Quinoa
Quinoa
is not a grass, but rather a pseudocereal botanically related to spinach and amaranth (Amaranthus spp.). After harvest, the seeds are processed to remove the bitter-tasting outer seed coat. Versatile for many dishes, cooked quinoa supplies nutrient content similar to wheat and rice, such as moderate amounts of protein, dietary fiber, and minerals
[...More...]

"Quinoa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Maize
Maize
Maize
(/meɪz/ MAYZ; Zea mays subsp. mays, from Spanish: maíz after Taíno mahiz), also known as corn, is a cereal grain first domesticated by indigenous peoples in southern Mexico[1][2] about 10,000 years ago. The leafy stalk of the plant produces separate pollen and ovuliferous inflorescences or ears, which are fruits, yielding kernels or seeds. Maize
Maize
has become a staple food in many parts of the world, with total production surpassing that of wheat or rice. However, not all of this maize is consumed directly by humans. Some of the maize production is used for corn ethanol, animal feed and other maize products, such as corn starch and corn syrup
[...More...]

"Maize" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Quechuan Languages
Quechua (/ˈkɛtʃuə/, in AmE also /ˈkɛtʃwɑː/)[2], known as Runasimi ("people's language") in the Quechuan language, is an indigenous language family, with variations spoken by the Quechua peoples, primarily living in the Andes
Andes
and highlands of South America.[3] Derived from a common ancestral language, it is the most widely spoken language family of indigenous peoples of the Americas, with a total of probably some 8–10 million speakers.[4] Approximately 25% (7.7 million) of Peruvians speak some variation of Quechua.[5][6] It is perhaps most widely known for being the main language of the Inca Empire. The colonisers initially encouraged its use, but from the middle of their reign they suppressed it
[...More...]

"Quechuan Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Morphology (linguistics)
In linguistics, morphology (/mɔːrˈfɒlədʒi/[1]) is the study of words, how they are formed, and their relationship to other words in the same language.[2][3] It analyzes the structure of words and parts of words, such as stems, root words, prefixes, and suffixes. Morphology also looks at parts of speech, intonation and stress, and the ways context can change a word's pronunciation and meaning. Morphology differs from morphological typology, which is the classification of languages based on their use of words,[4] and lexicology, which is the study of words and how they make up a language's vocabulary.[5] While words, along with clitics, are generally accepted as being the smallest units of syntax, in most languages, if not all, many words can be related to other words by rules that collectively describe the grammar for that language
[...More...]

"Morphology (linguistics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Alfredo Torero
Alfredo is a cognate of the Germanic name Alfred and a common Italian, Galician, Portuguese and Spanish language
Spanish language
personal name that may refer to: Alfredo Armas Alfonzo
[...More...]

"Alfredo Torero" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Brooklyn Museum
The Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Museum is an art museum located in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. At 560,000 square feet (52,000 m2), the museum is New York City's third largest in physical size and holds an art collection with roughly 1.5 million works.[2] Located near the Prospect Heights, Crown Heights, Flatbush, and Park Slope neighborhoods of Brooklyn
Brooklyn
and founded in 1895, the Beaux-Arts building, designed by McKim, Mead and White, was planned to be the largest art museum in the world. The museum initially struggled to maintain its building and collection, only to be revitalized in the late 20th century, thanks to major renovations. Significant areas of the collection include antiquities, specifically their collection of Egyptian antiquities
Egyptian antiquities
spanning over 3,000 years
[...More...]

"Brooklyn Museum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Point Cloud
A point cloud is a set of data points in space. Point clouds are generally produced by 3D scanners, which measure a large number of points on the external surfaces of objects around them. As the output of 3D scanning processes, point clouds are used for many purposes, including to create 3D CAD models for manufactured parts, for metrology and quality inspection, and for a multitude of visualization, animation, rendering and mass customization applications.Contents1 Alignment and registration 2 Conversion to 3D surfaces 3 See also 4 ReferencesAlignment and registration[edit] Main article: Point set registration Point clouds are often aligned with 3D models or with other point clouds, a process known as point set registration. For industrial metrology or inspection using industrial computed tomography, the point cloud of a manufactured part can be aligned to an existing model and compared to check for differences
[...More...]

"Point Cloud" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

CyArk
CyArk
CyArk
is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization located in Oakland, California, United States. The organization's website refers to it as a "digital archive of the world’s heritage sites for preservation and education"
[...More...]

"CyArk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Llama
The llama (/ˈlɑːmə/; Spanish: [ˈʝama] locally [ˈʎama] or [ˈʒama]) ( Lama
Lama
glama) is a domesticated South American camelid, widely used as a meat and pack animal by Andean cultures since the Pre-Columbian
Pre-Columbian
era. The height of a full-grown, full-size llama is 1.7 to 1.8 m (5.6 to 5.9 ft) tall at the top of the head, and can weigh between 130 and 200 kg (290 and 440 lb). At birth, a baby llama (called a cria) can weigh between 9 and 14 kg (20 and 31 lb). Llamas typically live for 15 to 25 years, with some individuals surviving 30 years or more.[2][3][4] They are very social animals and live with other llamas as a herd. The wool produced by a llama is very soft and lanolin-free. Llamas are intelligent and can learn simple tasks after a few repetitions
[...More...]

"Llama" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Psychoactive Plant
Psychoactive plants are plants, or preparations thereof, that upon ingestion induce psychotropic effects
[...More...]

"Psychoactive Plant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Creation Myth
A creation myth (or cosmogonic myth) is a symbolic narrative of how the world began and how people first came to inhabit it.[2][3][4] While in popular usage the term myth often refers to false or fanciful stories, members of cultures often ascribe varying degrees of truth to their creation myths.[5][6] In the society in which it is told, a creation myth is usually regarded as conveying profound truths, metaphorically, symbolically and sometimes in a historical or literal sense.[7][8] They are commonly, although not always, considered cosmogonical myths – that is, they describe the ordering of the cosmos from a state of chaos or amorphousness.[9] Creation myths often share a number of features
[...More...]

"Creation Myth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Moche Valley
The Valley of Moche, or Valley of Santa Catalina, is a large area of the La Libertad Region
La Libertad Region
in northern Peru
Peru
surrounding the Moche River. It has been farmed since the pre-Columbian era and currently contains rural and urban settlements. Trujillo is the most important city of the valley. It is now the location of several towns and agricultural areas where products such as sugarcane and asparagus are cultivated. The irrigation of its lands is part of the Chavimochic
Chavimochic
hydraulic engineering project.Contents1 History 2 Agriculture 3 Notable places 4 See also 5 External links5.1 Multimedia6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The pre-Columbian cultures Moche[1] and Chimu
Chimu
emerged here
[...More...]

"Moche Valley" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.