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Chauncey M. Depew
Chauncey Mitchell Depew (April 23, 1834 – April 5, 1928) was an attorney for Cornelius Vanderbilt's railroad interests, president of the New York Central Railroad
New York Central Railroad
System, and a United States Senator from New York from 1899 to 1911.[1]Contents1 Early life1.1 Education2 Career2.1 Legal career 2.2 Railroad lawyer 2.3 Politics3 Personal life3.1 Yale 3.2 Associations and civic activities 3.3 Legacy4 References 5 External linksE
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United States Senate
Majority (50)     Republican (50)Minority (49)     Democratic (47)      Independents (2) caucusing with the DemocratsVacant (1)     Vacant (1)Length of term6 yearsElectionsVoting systemFirst-past-the-post; nonpartisan blanket primary with a majoritarian second round in 3 states.Last electionNovember 8, 2016 (34 seats)Next electionNovember 6, 2018 (33 seats)Meeting placeSenate chamber United States
Unite

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New Jersey Junction Railroad
The New Jersey
New Jersey
Junction Railroad (NJJ) was part of the New York Central Railroad and ran along the Hudson River
Hudson River
in Hudson County, New Jersey, from the West Shore Railroad
West Shore Railroad
(NYCRR) yards at Weehawken Terminal south to Jersey City. It later owned an extension to the north, separated by the Weehawken yard from the original line. The company was incorporated under the laws of New Jersey
New Jersey
on February 27, 1886. On July 1, 1886, it was leased for 100 years to the New York Central and Hudson River
Hudson River
Railroad
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New York & Harlem Railroad
The New York and Harlem
Harlem
Railroad (now the Metro-North Railroad's Harlem
Harlem
Line) was one of the first railroads in the United States, and was the world's first street railway.[1][2] Designed by John Stephenson, it was opened in stages between 1832 and 1852 between Lower Manhattan
Lower Manhattan
to and beyond Harlem. Initially using horses, the line was partially converted to use steam engines and then electricity, using a battery-powered Julien electric traction car.[3][4][5] In 1907 the then leaseholders of line, New York City Railway
New York City Railway
went into receivership. Following a further receivership in 1932 the New York Railways Corporation converted the line to bus operation
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New York Central And Hudson River Railroad
The New York Central Railroad
Railroad
(reporting mark NYC) was a railroad operating in the Northeastern United States. Headquartered in New York City, the railroad served most of the Northeast, including extensive trackage in the states of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Massachusetts
Massachusetts
and West Virginia
West Virginia
plus additional trackage in the Canadian provinces of Ontario
Ontario
and Quebec. The railroad primarily connected greater New York and Boston
Boston
in the east with Chicago and St. Louis
St. Louis
in the midwest along with the intermediate cities of Albany, Buffalo, Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Detroit
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Samuel R. Callaway
Callaway may refer to:Contents1 Places in the United States 2 Other uses 3 See alsoPlaces in the United States[edit]Callaway, Florida Callaway, Maryland Callaway, Minnesota Callaway, Missouri Callaway, Nebraska Callaway, Virginia Calloway County, Kentucky Callaway County, Missouri Callaway T
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West Shore Railroad
The West Shore Railroad
Railroad
was the final name of a railroad that ran from Weehawken, New Jersey, which is across the Hudson River
Hudson River
from New York City, north along the west shore of the river to Albany, New York
Albany, New York
and then west to Buffalo. It was organized as a competitor to the New York Central and Hudson River
Hudson River
Railroad, but was soon taken over by that company.Contents1 History 2 Named trains 3 Route stations 4 Later years 5 West Shore Regional Proposal 6 See also 7 References 8 External links 9 SourcesHistory[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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New York And Harlem Railroad
The New York and Harlem
Harlem
Railroad (now the Metro-North Railroad's Harlem
Harlem
Line) was one of the first railroads in the United States, and was the world's first street railway.[1][2] Designed by John Stephenson, it was opened in stages between 1832 and 1852 between Lower Manhattan
Lower Manhattan
to and beyond Harlem. Initially using horses, the line was partially converted to use steam engines and then electricity, using a battery-powered Julien electric traction car.[3][4][5] In 1907 the then leaseholders of line, New York City Railway
New York City Railway
went into receivership. Following a further receivership in 1932 the New York Railways Corporation converted the line to bus operation
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Chicago And North Western Railway
The Chicago and North Western Transportation Company
Chicago and North Western Transportation Company
(reporting mark CNW) was a Class I railroad
Class I railroad
in the Midwestern United States. It was also known as the North Western. The railroad operated more than 5,000 miles (8,000 km) of track as of the turn of the 20th century, and over 12,000 miles (19,000 km) of track in seven states before retrenchment in the late 1970s. Until 1972, when the employees purchased the company, it was named the Chicago and North Western Railway (or Chicago and North Western Railway Company). The C&NW became one of the longest railroads in the United States as a result of mergers with other railroads, such as the Chicago Great Western Railway, Minneapolis and St. Louis Railway
Minneapolis and St. Louis Railway
and others. By 1995, track sales and abandonment had reduced the total mileage to about 5,000
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Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis And Omaha Railway
The Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railway
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railway
or Omaha Road (reporting mark CMO) was a railroad in the U.S. states of Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin
Wisconsin
and South Dakota. It was incorporated in 1880 as a consolidation of the Chicago, St. Paul and Minneapolis Railway and the North Wisconsin
Wisconsin
Railway.[1] The Chicago and North Western Railway (C&NW) gained control in 1882. The C&NW leased the Omaha Road in 1957 and merged the company into itself in 1972.[2] At the end of 1956 CStPM&O operated 1616 miles of road and 2396 miles of track; that year it reported 2115 million ton-miles of revenue freight and 65 million passenger-miles. Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railway
Chicago, St

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Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago And St. Louis Railroad
Rail transport
Rail transport
is a means of transferring of passengers and goods on wheeled vehicles running on rails, also known as tracks. It is also commonly referred to as train transport. In contrast to road transport, where vehicles run on a prepared flat surface, rail vehicles (rolling stock) are directionally guided by the tracks on which they run. Tracks usually consist of steel rails, installed on ties (sleepers) and ballast, on which the rolling stock, usually fitted with metal wheels, moves
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Delaware And Hudson Railroad
Delaware
Delaware
(/ˈdɛləwɛər/ ( listen))[10] is one of the 50 states of the United States, located in the Mid-Atlantic or Northeastern region.[a] It is bordered to the south and west by Maryland, to the north by Pennsylvania, and to the east by New Jersey and the Atlantic Ocean. The state takes its name from Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr, an English nobleman and Virginia's first colonial governor.[11] Delaware
Delaware
occupies the northeastern portion of the Delmarva Peninsula. It is the second smallest and sixth least populous state, but the sixth most densely populated. Delaware
Delaware
is divided into three counties, the lowest number of any state. From north to south, they are New Castle County, Kent County, and Sussex
Sussex
County
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Wallkill Valley Railroad
The Wallkill Valley Railroad
Wallkill Valley Railroad
is a defunct railroad which once operated in Ulster and Orange counties in upstate New York. Its corridor was from Kingston in the north to Montgomery in the south, with a leased extension to Campbell Hall. It crossed both the Wallkill River
Wallkill River
and Rondout Creek. The railroad was founded in 1866 and ceased regular service in 1977. Throughout its history, the Wallkill Valley Railroad
Wallkill Valley Railroad
was owned by a variety of companies, including the West Shore and New York Central railroads, as well as Conrail
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New York (state)
New York is a state in the northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.85 million residents in 2017,[4] it is the fourth most populous state. To differentiate from its city with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City
New York City
makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.[9] The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
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Canada Southern Railroad
The Canada
Canada
Southern Railway
Railway
(reporting mark CASO), also known as CSR, was a railway in southwestern Ontario, Canada, founded on February 28, 1868 as the Erie and Niagara Extension Railway.[1] Its name was changed to Canada
Canada
Southern Railway
Railway
on December 24, 1869.[2] The 1868 Act specified that it was to be constructed at a broad gauge of 5 ft 6 in (1,676 mm),[3] but that requirement was repealed in the 1869 Act,[4] thus allowing construction at the standard gauge of 4 ft 8 1⁄2 in (1,435 mm). The railway was leased to the Michigan Central Railroad
Michigan Central Railroad
(MCR) for 99 years; in 1929 it was subleased to the New York Central Railroad (NYC)
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Western Union
The Western Union
Western Union
Company is an American financial services and communications company. Its headquarters is in Meridian, Colorado, although the postal designation of nearby Englewood is used in its mailing address. Up until it discontinued the service in 2006, Western Union was the best-known U.S. company in the business of exchanging telegrams.[3][4] Western Union
Western Union
has several divisions, with products such as person-to-person money transfer, money orders, business payments and commercial services. They offered standard "Cablegrams", as well as more cheerful products such as Candygrams, Dollygrams, and Melodygrams. Western Union, as an industrialized monopoly, dominated the telegraph industry in the late 19th century
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