HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Charles Whitman Cross
Charles Whitman Cross
Charles Whitman Cross
(September 1, 1854 – April 20, 1949) was an American geologist. He was educated at Amherst College, the University of Göttingen, and Leipzig University. A petrologist, much of his field work concerned rocks in Colorado. He and three other geologists proposed the CIPW norm that is still used in normative mineralogy. He was also active in scientific societies and institutions.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career2.1 Research 2.2 Other professional activities3 Personal life 4 Death and legacy 5 Bibliography 6 Footnotes 7 Citations 8 ReferencesEarly life and education[edit] Cross was born September 1, 1854, in Amherst, Massachusetts,[birth 1] to Maria Mason Cross and the Rev. Moses Kimball Cross.[3] Later his family moved to Waverly, Iowa, where he graduated high school. In 1872 he entered the Scientific Course at Amherst College
[...More...]

"Charles Whitman Cross" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Amherst, Massachusetts
Amherst (/ˈæmərst/ ( listen))[4] is a town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, United States, in the Connecticut River
Connecticut River
valley. As of the 2010 census, the population was 37,819,[5] making it the highest populated municipality in Hampshire County (although the county seat is Northampton). The town is home to Amherst College, Hampshire College, and the University of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Amherst, three of the Five Colleges. The name of the town is pronounced without the h ("AM-erst"),[6] giving rise to the local saying, "only the 'h' is silent", in reference both to the pronunciation and to the town's politically active populace.[7] Amherst has three census-designated places; Amherst Center, North Amherst, and South Amherst. Amherst is part of the Springfield, Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Metropolitan Statistical Area
[...More...]

"Amherst, Massachusetts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
[...More...]

"Alma Mater" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wyoming
Wyoming
Wyoming
/waɪˈoʊmɪŋ/ ( listen) is a state in the mountain region of the western United States. The state is the 10th largest by area, the least populous and the second least densely populated state in the country. Wyoming
Wyoming
is bordered on the north by Montana, on the east by South Dakota
South Dakota
and Nebraska, on the south by Colorado, on the southwest by Utah, and on the west by Idaho. The state population was estimated at 586,107 in 2015, which is less than 31 of the most populous U.S. cities including neighboring Denver.[8] Cheyenne is the state capital and the most populous city, with population estimated at 63,335 in 2015.[9] The western two-thirds of the state is covered mostly by the mountain ranges and rangelands of the Rocky Mountains, while the eastern third of the state is high elevation prairie called the High Plains
[...More...]

"Wyoming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hawaii
Coordinates: 21°18′41″N 157°47′47″W / 21.31139°N 157.79639°W / 21.31139; -157.79639State of Hawaii Mokuʻāina o Hawaiʻi  (Hawaiian)Flag SealNickname(s): The Aloha State (official), Paradise of the Pacific,[1] The Islands of AlohaMotto(s): Ua Mau ke Ea o ka ʻĀina i ka Pono ("The Life of the Land is Perpetuated in Righteousness")[2]State song(s): "Hawaiʻi Ponoʻī (Hawaiʻi's Own True Sons)[3]"Official language English, HawaiianDemonym Hawaiian[a]Capital (and largest city) HonoluluLargest metro Island of OahuArea Ranked 43rd • Total 10,931 sq mi (28,311 km2) • Width n/a miles (n/a km) • Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km) • % water 41.2 •
[...More...]

"Hawaii" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chevy Chase, Maryland
Chevy Chase
Chevy Chase
is the name of both a town and an unincorporated census-designated place ( Chevy Chase
Chevy Chase
(CDP), Maryland) that straddle the northwest border of Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
and Montgomery County, Maryland. Several settlements in the same area of Montgomery County and one neighborhood of Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
include "Chevy Chase" in their names. These villages, the town, and the CDP share a common history and together form a larger community colloquially referred to as "Chevy Chase". Primarily a residential suburb, Chevy Chase
Chevy Chase
adjoins Friendship Heights, a popular shopping district
[...More...]

"Chevy Chase, Maryland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Henry Stephens Washington
Henry Stephens Washington (January 15, 1867 – January 7, 1934) was an American geologist.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Washington was born in Newark, New Jersey on January 15, 1867.[1] He attended Yale University, graduating in 1886, and took his masters there two years later.[1] He received his Ph.D. at the University of Leipzig in 1893.[1] He also studied at the American School for Classical Studies in Athens, Greece.[2] His research included trips to Greece, Asia Minor, Italy, Spain, Brazil and the Hawaiian islands.[1] By 1920 he was a consulting mining geologist of high reputation.[2] Works[edit] His works include:[2]Chemical Analyses of Igneous Rocks (1903) Manual of the Chemical Analysis of Rocks (1904; 2d ed., 1910) The Roman Cogmatic Region (1907)Notes[edit]^ a b c d "DR. H. S. WASHINGTON, PETROLOGIST, DEAD; Carnegie lnstitugion Expert on Rocks Won High Honors in Field Here and Abroad." The New York Times
[...More...]

"Henry Stephens Washington" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States National Research Council
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
Medicine
(also known as "NASEM" or "the National Academies") is the collective scientific National Academy of the United States. The name is used interchangeably in two senses: (1) as an umbrella term for its three quasi-independent honorific member organizations (the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the National Academy of Engineering
National Academy of Engineering
(NAE), and the National Academy of Medicine
National Academy of Medicine
(NAM)). And (2) as the brand for studies and reports issued by the operating arm of the three academies, the National Research Council (NRC). The NRC was first formed in 1916 as an activity of the NAS
[...More...]

"United States National Research Council" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carnegie Institution Of Washington
Institutions are "stable, valued, recurring patterns of behavior".[1] As structures or mechanisms of social order, they govern the behaviour of a set of individuals within a given community. Institutions are identified with a social purpose, transcending individuals and intentions by mediating the rules that govern living behavior.[2] The term "institution" commonly applies to both informal institutions such as customs, or behavior patterns important to a society, and to particular formal institutions created by entities such as the government and public services
[...More...]

"Carnegie Institution Of Washington" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

National Academy Of Sciences
The National Academy of Sciences
National Academy of Sciences
(NAS) is a United States
United States
nonprofit, non-governmental organization. NAS is part of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, along with the National Academy of Engineering
Engineering
(NAE) and the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). As a national academy, new members of the organization are elected annually by current members, based on their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. Election to the National Academies is one of the highest honors in the scientific field. Members serve pro bono as "advisers to the nation" on science, engineering, and medicine
[...More...]

"National Academy Of Sciences" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Moses T. Stevens
Moses Tyler Stevens (October 10, 1825 in North Andover, Massachusetts – March 25, 1907) was an American textile manufacturer and a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts. Biography[edit] Moses Tyler Stevens was born in North Andover (then a part of Andover), Essex County, Massachusetts as the son of textile manufacturer Nathaniel Stevens. He was also the brother of U.S. Representative Charles Abbot Stevens and a cousin of U.S. Representative Isaac Ingalls Stevens. Stevens attended Franklin Academy, a public school in North Andover. He graduated from Phillips Academy, Andover, in 1842. He attended Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire for one year in 1842 and 1843. Stevens joined his father's woolen goods manufacturing business after leaving college and became a partner in the business in 1850 under the name Nathaniel Stevens & Son in North Andover. Stevens married Charlotte Emeline Osgood in 1853
[...More...]

"Moses T. Stevens" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
[...More...]

"Washington, D.C." on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Maryland
Motto(s): Fatti maschii, parole femine (English: Strong Deeds, Gentle Words)[3] The Latin text encircling the seal: Scuto bonæ voluntatis tuæ coronasti nos (With favor Wilt Thou Compass Us as with a Shield) Psalm 5:12[4]State song(s): "Maryland, My Maryland"Official language None (English, de facto)Demonym MarylanderCapital AnnapolisLargest city BaltimoreLargest metro Baltimore- Washington Metro
Washington Metro
AreaArea Ranked 42nd • Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km2) • Width 196 miles (315 km) • Length 119 m
[...More...]

"Maryland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

University Of Chicago Press
The University of Chicago
University of Chicago
Press is the largest and one of the oldest university presses in the United States.[3] It is operated by the University of Chicago
University of Chicago
and publishes a wide
[...More...]

"University Of Chicago Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Southampton, Massachusetts
Southampton (/saʊθˈhæmptən/ ( listen))[1] is a town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, United States. It was established first as a district of Northampton in 1753. It was incorporated in 1753. The name Southampton was given to it during its first town meeting in 1773. Its ZIP code is 01073. Southampton is part of the Springfield, Massachusetts Metropolitan Statistical Area. The town had a population of 5,792 at the 2010 census. Southampton was rated having the best tasting tap water in the country in 2008 by the National Rural Water Association.[2] U.S
[...More...]

"Southampton, Massachusetts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.