HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Charles Wheatstone
Sir Charles Wheatstone
Charles Wheatstone
/ˈwiːtstən/[1] FRS (6 February 1802 – 19 October 1875), was an English scientist and inventor of many scientific breakthroughs of the Victorian era, including the English concertina, the stereoscope (a device for displaying three-dimensional images), and the Playfair cipher
Playfair cipher
(an encryption technique)
[...More...]

"Charles Wheatstone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Marylebone
Marylebone
Marylebone
(/ˈmærɪləbən/ or /ˈmærələbən/[1], both appropriate for the Parish Church of St. Marylebone, /ˈmærɪbən/, /ˈmɑːrlɪbən/, or /ˈmærɪlɪboʊn/[2]) is an affluent inner-city area of central London, England, located within the City of Westminster
Westminster
and part of the West End
[...More...]

"Marylebone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Royal Swedish Academy Of Sciences
The Royal Swedish Academy
Swedish Academy
of Sciences or Kungliga Vetenskapsakademien is one of the Royal Academies of Sweden
[...More...]

"Royal Swedish Academy Of Sciences" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Francesco Bartolozzi
Francesco Bartolozzi
Francesco Bartolozzi
RA (Florence, 21 September 1727 – 7 March 1815, Lisbon) was an Italian engraver, whose most productive period was spent in London. He is noted for popularising engraving (also known as the crayon method of engraving).Early life[edit] Bartolozzi was born in Florence
Florence
in 1727. He was originally destined to follow the profession of his father, a gold- and silver-smith, but he manifested so much skill and taste in designing that he was placed under the supervision of two Florentine artists, including Ignazio Hugford and Giovanni Domenico Ferretti
Giovanni Domenico Ferretti
who instructed him in painting. After devoting three years to that art, he went to Venice
Venice
and studied engraving
[...More...]

"Francesco Bartolozzi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pall Mall, London
Pall Mall /ˌpæl ˈmæl/ is a street in the St James's
St James's
area of the City of Westminster, Central London. It connects St James's Street
St James's Street
to Trafalgar Square
Trafalgar Square
and is a section of the regional A4 road. The street's name is derived from "pall-mall", a ball game played there during the 17th century. The area was built up during the reign of Charles II with fashionable London
London
residences. It became known for high-class shopping in the 18th century, and gentlemen's clubs in the 19th. The Reform, Athenaeum and Travellers Clubs have survived to the 21st century
[...More...]

"Pall Mall, London" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alessandro Volta
Alessandro Giuseppe Antonio Anastasio Volta (Italian: [alesˈsandro ˈvɔlta]; 18 February 1745 – 5 March 1827) was an Italian physicist, chemist, and a pioneer of electricity and power,[2][3][4] who is credited as the inventor of the electrical battery and the discoverer of methane. He invented the Voltaic pile
Voltaic pile
in 1799, and reported the results of his experiments in 1800 in a two-part letter to the President of the Royal Society.[5][6] With this invention Volta proved that electricity could be generated chemically and debunked the prevalent theory that electricity was generated solely by living beings
[...More...]

"Alessandro Volta" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Micrographia
Micrographia: or Some Phyſiological Deſcriptions of Minute Bodies Made by Magnifying Glasses. With Observations and Inquiries Thereupon. is a historically significant book by Robert Hooke
Robert Hooke
about his observations through various lenses. It is particularly notable for being the first book to illustrate insects, plants etc. as seen through microscopes. Published in January 1665, the first major publication of the Royal Society, it became the first scientific best-seller[citation needed], inspiring a wide public interest in the new science of microscopy. It is also notable for coining the biological term cell.Contents1 Observations 2 Reception 3 Methods 4 Bibliography 5 References 6 External linksObservations[edit] Hooke most famously describes a fly's eye and a plant cell (where he coined that term because plant cells, which are walled, reminded him of the cells in a honeycomb[1])
[...More...]

"Micrographia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Taunton
Taunton
Taunton
/ˈtɔːntən/ is a large regional town in Somerset, England. The town currently peaks at a population of 69,570 as of 2018.[2] The town itself has over 1,000 years of religious and military history, including a monastery dating back to the 10th century and Taunton Castle, which has origins in the Anglo Saxon period and was later the site of a priory. The Normans
Normans
then built a stone structured castle, which belonged to the Bishops of Winchester. The current heavily reconstructed buildings are the inner ward, which now houses the Museum of Somerset
Somerset
and the Somerset
Somerset
Military Museum. The town is undergoing a regeneration project with redevelopment of the town centre. It has various transport links which support its central role in economy and commerce
[...More...]

"Taunton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Legion Of Honour
The Legion of Honour, full name, National Order of the Legion of Honour (French: Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur),[2] is the highest French order of merit for military and civil merits, established in 1802 by Napoléon Bonaparte and retained by all the divergent governments and regimes later holding power in France, up to the present. The order's motto is "Honneur et Patrie" ("Honour and Fatherland"), and its seat is the Palais de la Légion d'Honneur
Palais de la Légion d'Honneur
next to the Musée d'Orsay, on the left bank of the
[...More...]

"Legion Of Honour" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

French Academy Of Sciences
The French Academy of Sciences
Academy of Sciences
(French: Académie des sciences) is a learned society, founded in 1666 by Louis XIV
Louis XIV
at the suggestion of Jean-Baptiste Colbert, to encourage and protect the spirit of French scientific research
[...More...]

"French Academy Of Sciences" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Windsor, Berkshire
Windsor (/ˈwɪnzər/ WIN-zər) is a historic market town and unparished area in the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead
Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead
in Berkshire, England. It is widely known as the site of Windsor Castle, one of the official residences of the British Royal Family. The town is situated 21 miles (34 km)[1] west of Charing Cross, London, 7 miles (11 km) south east of Maidenhead, and 22 miles (35 km) east of the county town of Reading. It is immediately south of the River Thames, which forms its boundary with its smaller, ancient twin town of Eton
[...More...]

"Windsor, Berkshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pneumonia
Pneumonia
Pneumonia
is an inflammatory condition of the lung affecting primarily the small air sacs known as alveoli.[4][13] Typically symptoms include some combination of productive or dry cough, chest pain, fever, and trouble breathing.[2] Severity is variable.[2] Pneumonia
[...More...]

"Pneumonia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Blue Plaque
A blue plaque is a permanent sign installed in a public place in the United Kingdom and elsewhere to commemorate a link between that location and a famous person, event, or former building on the site, serving as a historical marker. The term is used in the United Kingdom in two different senses. It may be used narrowly and specifically to refer to the "official" scheme administered by English Heritage, and currently restricted to sites within Greater London; or it may be used less formally to encompass similar schemes elsewhere. The "official" scheme traces its origins to that launched in 1866 in London, on the initiative of the politician William Ewart, to mark the homes and workplaces of famous people.[1][2] It has been administered successively by the Society of Arts (1866–1901), the London County Council (1901–1965), the Greater London
Greater London
Council (1965–1986) and English Heritage
English Heritage
(1986 to date)
[...More...]

"Blue Plaque" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kensal Green Cemetery
Kensal Green
Kensal Green
Cemetery is in Kensal Green
Kensal Green
in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London, England. Inspired by Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris, it was founded by the barrister George Frederick Carden.[1] The cemetery opened in 1833 and comprises 72 acres of grounds, including two conservation areas, adjoining a canal. The cemetery is home to at least 33 species of bird and other wildlife. This distinctive cemetery has memorials ranging from large mausoleums housing the rich and famous to many distinctive smaller graves and includes special areas dedicated to the very young. It has three chapels, and serves all faiths.[2] The cemetery was immortalised in the lines of G. K
[...More...]

"Kensal Green Cemetery" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Harp
The harp is a stringed musical instrument that has a number of individual strings running at an angle to its soundboard; the strings are plucked with the fingers. Harps have been known since antiquity in Asia, Africa and Europe, dating back at least as early as 3500 BCE. The instrument had great popularity in Europe during the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and Renaissance, where it evolved into a wide range of variants with new technologies, and was disseminated to Europe's colonies, finding particular popularity in Latin America. Although some ancient members of the harp family died out in the Near East and South Asia, descendants of early harps are still played in Myanmar and parts of Africa, and other defunct variants in Europe and Asia have been utilized by musicians in the modern era. Harps vary globally in many ways. In terms of size, many smaller harps can be played on the lap, whereas larger harps are quite heavy and rest on the floor
[...More...]

"Harp" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hammered Dulcimer
The hammered dulcimer is a percussion-stringed instrument which consists of strings typically stretched over a trapezoidal resonant sound board. The hammered dulcimer is set before the musician, who, in more traditional styles, may sit cross legged on the floor, or at a more modern style of standing or sitting at a wooden stand on legs. The player holds a small spoon shaped mallet hammer in each hand to strike the strings (cf. Appalachian dulcimer). The Graeco-Roman dulcimer (sweet song) derives from the Latin
Latin
dulcis (sweet) and the Greek melos (song)
[...More...]

"Hammered Dulcimer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.