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Charles Mason
Charles Mason
Charles Mason
(April 1728 [baptised 1 May][1] – 25 October 1786) was an English astronomer who made significant contributions to 18th-century science and American history, particularly through his involvement with the survey of the Mason–Dixon line, which came to mark the border between Maryland
Maryland
and Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
(1764–1768)
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Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
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Monongahela River
The Monongahela River
River
(/məˌnɒŋɡəˈhiːlə, -ˈheɪ-/ mə-NONG-gə-HEE-lə, -HAY-)[10] — often referred to locally as the Mon (/ˈmɒn/) — is a 130-mile-long (210 km)[6] river on the Allegheny Plateau
Allegheny Plateau
in north-central West Virginia
West Virginia
and southwestern Pennsylvania, which flows from south to north. The Monongahela joins the Allegheny River
River
to form the Ohio River
Ohio River
at Pittsburgh.Contents1 Etymology1.1 Variant names2 Geography 3 History3.1 Ice Age 3.2 18th and 19th centuries 3.3 20th century4 Gallery 5 See also 6 Notes and references 7 Bibliography 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The Unami word Monongahela means "falling banks", in reference to the geological instability of the river's banks
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SNAC
SNAC, or Social Networks and Archival Context, is an online effort for discovering, locating, and using distributed historical records started by a collaboration of United States-based organizations. It was established in 2010, with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA),[1] California Digital Library (CDL), Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH) at the University of Virginia and the University of California, Berkeley School of Information.[2][3] See also[edit] Archival Resource Key (ARK)References[edit]^ Ferriero, David (2015-08-18). "Introducing SNAC". National Archives - AOTUS blog. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ "SNAC: Social Networks and Archival Context". socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ Larson, Ray R.; Pitti, Daniel; Turner, Adrian (2014)
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Charles Manson
Charles Milles Manson
Manson
(né Maddox, November 12, 1934 – November 19, 2017) was an American criminal and cult leader. In the late 1960s, he formed what became known as the Manson
Manson
Family, a quasi-commune in California. Manson's followers committed a series of nine murders at four locations in July and August 1969. In 1971 he was convicted of first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder for the deaths of seven people, all of which were carried out at his instruction by members of the group. Manson
Manson
was also convicted of first-degree murder for two other deaths. At the time the Manson Family
Manson Family
began to form, Manson
Manson
was an unemployed ex-convict who had spent half of his life in correctional institutions for a variety of offenses
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Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
(/ˌpɛnsɪlˈveɪniə/ ( listen); Pennsylvania German: Pennsylvaani or Pennsilfaani), officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware
Delaware
to the southeast, Maryland
Maryland
to the south, West Virginia
West Virginia
to the southwest, Ohio
Ohio
to the west, Lake Erie
Lake Erie
and the Canadian province of Ontario
Ontario
to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey
New Jersey
to the east. Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
is the 33rd-largest, the 5th-most populous, and the 9th-most densely populated of the 50 United States
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Maryland
Motto(s): Fatti maschii, parole femine (English: Strong Deeds, Gentle Words)[3] The Latin text encircling the seal: Scuto bonæ voluntatis tuæ coronasti nos (With favor Wilt Thou Compass Us as with a Shield) Psalm 5:12[4]State song(s): "Maryland, My Maryland"Official language None (English, de facto)Demonym MarylanderCapital AnnapolisLargest city BaltimoreLargest metro Baltimore- Washington Metro
Washington Metro
AreaArea Ranked 42nd • Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km2) • Width 196 miles (315 k
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West Virginia
West Virginia
Virginia
/- vərˈdʒɪniə/ ( listen) is a state located in the Appalachian region of the Southern United States.[7][8][9][10][11] It is bordered by Virginia
Virginia
to the southeast, Kentucky
Kentucky
to the southwest, Ohio
Ohio
to the northwest, and Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and Maryland
Maryland
to the northeast. West Virginia
Virginia
is the 10th smallest by area, and is ranked 38th in population. The capital and largest city is Charleston. West Virginia
Virginia
became a state following the Wheeling Conventions of 1861, after the American Civil War
American Civil War
had begun
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Delaware
Delaware
Delaware
(/ˈdɛləwɛər/ ( listen))[10] is one of the 50 states of the United States, located in the Mid-Atlantic or Northeastern region.[a] It is bordered to the south and west by Maryland, to the north by Pennsylvania, and to the east by New Jersey and the Atlantic Ocean. The state takes its name from Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr, an English nobleman and Virginia's first colonial governor.[11] Delaware
Delaware
occupies the northeastern portion of the Delmarva Peninsula. It is the second smallest and sixth least populous state, but the sixth most densely populated. Delaware
Delaware
is divided into three counties, the lowest number of any state. From north to south, they are New Castle County, Kent County, and Sussex
Sussex
County
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Royal Society
The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society
Royal Society
of London for Improving Natural Knowledge,[1] commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society. Founded in November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society".[1] It is the oldest national scientific institution in the world.[2] The society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences
Academy of Sciences
and fulfils a number of roles: promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global co-operation, education and public engagement. The society is governed by its Council, which is chaired by the Society's President, according to a set of statutes and standing orders
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Great Indian Warpath
The Great Indian Warpath
Great Indian Warpath
(GIW)—also known as the Great Indian War and Trading Path, or the Seneca Trail—was that part of the network of trails in eastern North America
North America
developed and used by Native Americans which ran through the Great Appalachian Valley. The system of footpaths (the Warpath branched off in several places onto alternate routes and over time shifted westward in some regions) extended from what is now upper New York state to deep within Alabama. Various Indians traded and made war along the trails, including the Catawba, numerous Algonquian tribes, the Cherokee, and the Iroquois Confederacy
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Man-of-War
The man-of-war (pl. men-of-war; also man of war, man-o'-war, man o' war, or simply man)[1][2] was a British Royal Navy
Royal Navy
expression for a powerful warship or frigate from the 16th to the 19th century. The term often refers to a ship armed with cannon and propelled primarily by sails, as opposed to a galley which is propelled primarily by oars. The man-of-war was developed in Portugal in the early 15th century from earlier roundships with the addition of a second mast to form the carrack. The 16th century saw the carrack evolve into the galleon and then the ship of the line. The evolution of the term has been given thus:Man-of-war. "A phrase applied to a line of battle ship, contrary to the usual rule in the English language by which all ships are feminine. It probably arose in the following manner: 'Men of war' were heavily armed soldiers
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HM Nautical Almanac Office
Her Majesty's Nautical Almanac
Nautical Almanac
Office (HMNAO), now part of the United Kingdom Hydrographic Office, was established in 1832 on the site of the Royal Greenwich Observatory
Royal Greenwich Observatory
(RGO), where The Nautical Almanac had been published since 1767. HMNAO produces astronomical data for a wide range of users, such as astronomers, mariners, aviators, surveyors, the military, Police, lawyers, religious groups, architects, schools, diary and calendar manufacturers, photographers and film crews. In 1937, it became part of RGO and moved with it, first to Herstmonceux Castle, near Hailsham
Hailsham
in East Sussex
East Sussex
in 1948, then to Cambridge
Cambridge
in 1990. When RGO closed in 1998 HMNAO was transferred to the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, near Abingdon in Oxfordshire
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Benjamin Franklin
Benjamin Franklin
Benjamin Franklin
FRS FRSE (January 17, 1706 [O.S. January 6, 1705][1] – April 17, 1790) was an American polymath and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. Franklin was a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, freemason, postmaster, scientist, inventor, humorist, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. As a scientist, he was a major figure in the American Enlightenment and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. As an inventor, he is known for the lightning rod, bifocals, and the Franklin stove, among other inventions.[2] He founded many civic organizations, including Philadelphia's fire department and the University of Pennsylvania.[3] Franklin earned the title of "The First American" for his early and indefatigable campaigning for colonial unity, initially as an author and spokesman in London for several colonies
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Moon
The Moon
The Moon
is an astronomical body that orbits planet Earth, being Earth's only permanent natural satellite. It is the fifth-largest natural satellite in the Solar System, and the largest among planetary satellites relative to the size of the planet that it orbits (its primary). Following Jupiter's satellite Io, the Moon
Moon
is the second-densest satellite in the Solar System
Solar System
among those whose densities are known. The Moon
The Moon
is thought to have formed about 4.51 billion years ago, not long after Earth
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Mark Knopfler
Mark Freuder Knopfler, OBE (born 12 August 1949) is a British singer-songwriter, guitarist, record producer and film score composer. He was the lead guitarist, lead singer and songwriter for the rock band Dire Straits, which he co-founded with his younger brother, David Knopfler, in 1977. He was born in Glasgow
Glasgow
but raised near Newcastle upon Tyne, England. Since Dire Straits
Dire Straits
disbanded in 1995, Knopfler has recorded and produced eight solo albums and, as with his previous band, produced many hit songs.[1] He has composed and produced film scores for nine films, including Local Hero
Local Hero
(1983), Cal (1984), The Princess Bride (1987), Wag the Dog
Wag the Dog
(1997) and Altamira (2016).[2] In addition to his work with Dire Straits, and as a solo artist and composer, Knopfler has recorded and performed with many prominent musicians, including B.B
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