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Charles Longley
Charles Thomas Longley (28 July 1794 – 27 October 1868)[1] was a bishop in the Church of England. He served as Bishop of Ripon, Bishop of Durham, Archbishop of York
Archbishop of York
and Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
from 1862 until his death.Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] He was born at Rochester, Kent, the fifth son of the late John Longley, Recorder of Rochester,[2] and educated at Westminster School and Christ Church, Oxford.[3] He was ordained in 1818, and was appointed vicar of Cowley, Oxford, in 1823. In 1827, he received the rectory of West Tytherley, Hampshire, and two years later he was elected headmaster of Harrow School. He held this office until 1836, when he was consecrated bishop of the new see of Ripon
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Thomas James Longley
Thomas James Longley (born 22 April 1992)[1] is an English actor and model.[2][3][4] Career[edit] In 2004, Longley achieved acclaim from The Times for his performance as Gabriel in a widely publicised revival of The Mystery Plays at Canterbury Cathedral.[5][6] He has since appeared in the indie films Sparrow (2010), Day and Night (2012), and Island (2013).[7][8][9][10][11][12][13] In 2011, he briefly modelled for Reiss.[14][15][16][17] References[edit]^ England & Wales, Birth Index: 1984-2005 ^ "Actor Thomas James Longley drops out of new British Indie Thriller "Hayze"". 2011-03-25. Retrieved 2011-04-02.  ^ "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Trivia". Dark Horizons. 15 July 2009. Archived from the original on 5 July 2009. Retrieved 13 August 2010.  ^ "5 questions with Thomas James Longley". Portis Wasp. Retrieved 1 December 2011.  ^ "Revival of Medieval Mystery Plays". BBC News. 2004-08-05. Retrieved 2010-08-13.  ^ Kingston, Jeremy (2004-08-09)
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Staffordshire
Staffordshire
Staffordshire
(/ˈstæfərdʃɪər/ or /ˈstæfərdʃər/;[2] abbreviated Staffs) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands of England. It adjoins Cheshire
Cheshire
to the north west, Derbyshire
Derbyshire
and Leicestershire
Leicestershire
to the east, Warwickshire
Warwickshire
to the south east, West Midlands and Worcestershire
Worcestershire
to the south, and Shropshire
Shropshire
to the west. Stone railway station
Stone railway station
in Stone.The largest city in Staffordshire
Staffordshire
is Stoke-on-Trent, which is administered separately from the rest of the county as an independent unitary authority. Lichfield
Lichfield
also has city status, although this is a considerably smaller cathedral city
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Lewis Carroll
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (/ˈlʌtwɪdʒ ˈdɒdsən/;[1][2][3] 27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll (/ˈkærəl/), was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican
Anglican
deacon, and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, which includes the poem "Jabberwocky", and the poem The Hunting of the Snark – all examples of the genre of literary nonsense. He is noted for his facility at word play, logic and fantasy
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Henry Parnell, 1st Baron Congleton
Henry Brooke Parnell, 1st Baron Congleton
Baron Congleton
PC (3 July 1776 – 8 June 1842), known as Sir Henry Parnell, Bt, from 1812 to 1841, was an Irish writer and Whig politician. He was a member of the Whig administrations headed by Lord Grey and Lord Melbourne of the 1830s and also published works on financial and penal questions as well as on civil engineering. He was the great-uncle of Irish nationalist leader Charles Stewart Parnell.Contents1 Background and education 2 Political career 3 Writings 4 Family 5 References 6 External linksBackground and education[edit] Parnell was the second son of Sir John Parnell, 2nd Baronet, Chancellor of the Irish Exchequer,[1] and Laetitia Charlotte, daughter of Sir Arthur Brooke, 1st Baronet. His younger brother William Parnell-Hayes was the grandfather of Charles Stewart Parnell
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Floruit
Floruit (/ˈflɔːr(j)uɪt, ˈflɒr-/), abbreviated fl. (or occasionally, flor.), Latin
Latin
for "he/she flourished", denotes a date or period during which a person was known to have been alive or active.[1][2] In English, the word may also be used as a noun indicating the time when someone "flourished".[1] Etymology and use[edit] Latin: flōruit is the third-person singular perfect active indicative of the Latin
Latin
verb flōreō, flōrēre "to bloom, flower, or flourish", from the noun flōs, flōris, "flower".[3][2] Broadly, the term is employed in reference to the peak of activity for a person, movement, or such
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Lord Privy Seal
The Lord Privy Seal
Lord Privy Seal
(or, more formally, the Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal) is the fifth of the Great Officers of State
Great Officers of State
in the United Kingdom, ranking beneath the Lord President of the Council
Lord President of the Council
and above the Lord Great Chamberlain. Originally, its holder was responsible for the monarch's personal (privy) seal (as opposed to the Great Seal of the Realm, which is in the care of the Lord Chancellor) until the use of such a seal became obsolete. The office is currently one of the traditional sinecure offices of state. Today, the holder of the office is invariably given a seat in the Cabinet of the United Kingdom. Though one of the oldest offices in government anywhere, it has no particular function today because the use of a privy seal has been obsolete for centuries; thus the office has generally been used as a kind of minister without portfolio
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Bridgewater Estates
Worsley (/ˈwɔːrzli/) is a town in the metropolitan borough of the City of Salford, in Greater Manchester, England. A profile of the electoral ward Worsley conducted by Salford City Council in 2014 recorded a population of 10,090.[1] It lies along the course of Worsley Brook, 5.75 miles (9.25 km) west of Manchester. The M60 motorway bisects the area. Historically part of Lancashire, Worsley has provided evidence of Roman and Anglo-Saxon activity, including two Roman roads. The completion in 1761 of the Bridgewater Canal allowed Worsley to expand from a small village of cottage industries to an important town based upon cotton manufacture, iron-working, brick-making and extensive coal mining. Later expansion came after the First and Second World Wars, when large urban estates were built in the region. Today, Worsley is under consideration to be made a World Heritage Site, including Worsley Delph, a scheduled monument
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Terence Bourke, 10th Earl Of Mayo
Terence Patrick Bourke, 10th Earl of Mayo (26 August 1929 – 22 September 2006) spent much of his life in England, before moving to Ireland and finally France. He was a pilot in the Fleet Air Arm, ran a printing company, attempted to be elected as an MP in England, ran a marble quarrying company, and finally bred deer in south-west France. Biography[edit] Bourke was born in Gosforth, Northumbria. His father was the Honorable Bryan Longley Bourke, the 3rd son of Walter Longley Bourke, 8th Earl of Mayo. Bourke was educated at St. Aubyns Preparatory School in Rottingdean before attending the Dartmouth Royal Naval College as a cadet. He joined the Fleet Air Arm, and flew Sea Hawks in the Suez Crisis in 1956. He then flew aerobatics with No. 703 Naval Air Squadron. He left the Royal Navy on medical grounds in 1959. He set up a printing company in Gosport in Hampshire, and became active in local politics, serving as a Conservative councillor from 1961 to 1964
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Levett
Levett
Levett
is an Anglo-Norman territorial surname deriving from the village of Livet-en-Ouche, now Jonquerets-de-Livet, in Eure, Normandy. Ancestors of the earliest Levett
Levett
family in England, the de Livets were lords of the village of Livet,[1] and undertenants of the de Ferrers, among the most powerful of William the Conqueror's Norman lords.[2]Contents1 History 2 The origin of the name Levett 3 People 4 Places named after the family 5 Places associated with the Levett
Levett
family 6 In media 7 Adaptations 8 See also 9 References9.1 Notes 9.2 Further reading10 External linksHistory[edit]Assembled partygoers at Tranby Croft, 11 September 1890. The Royal Baccarat Scandal. Pictured are Capt
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10th Royal Hussars
The 10th Royal Hussars (Prince of Wales's Own) was a cavalry regiment of the British Army
British Army
raised in 1715
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Wychnor Hall
Wychnor Hall
Wychnor Hall
(or Wychnor Park) is Grade II Listed
Grade II Listed
early 18th-century country house near Burton on Trent, Staffordshire. The Hall was formerly owned by the Levett
Levett
Family, descendants of Theophilus Levett, who was Steward of the city of Lichfield
Lichfield
in the early eighteenth century. The hall has been converted to a Country Club.Contents1 History1.1 The Levett
Levett
Family 1.2 Later history2 References 3 External links 4 Further readingHistory[edit] Wychnor takes its name from the Old English
Old English
meaning 'village on a bank.' Its earliest spelling was H.wiccenofre. Ofre was the Anglo-Saxon word for "edge or bank". Hwicce was a provence comprising Gloucestershire, Worcestershire and a part of Warwickshire and the people were called Hwiccas or Hwicii
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Packington Hall (Staffordshire)
Packington Hall (grid reference SK163063) in Staffordshire, England was a country mansion designed by architect James Wyatt in the 18th century. Originally built for the Babington family,[1] it became the home of the Levett family for many generations.[2] The Levetts had ties to Whittington, Staffordshire and nearby Hopwas for many years. Packington Hall is located approximately two miles from Lichfield, and was likely built for Zachary Babington[3] whose daughter Mary Babington married Theophilus Levett, town clerk of Lichfield.[4] From Theophilus Levett the home passed to a succession of family members, including MP John Levett, the Rev. Thomas Levett, who was the vicar of Whittington, and Robert Thomas Kennedy Levett, DL, JP.[5] The Levett family, many of whom also resided at Wychnor Hall in the same county, embraced vicars, MP's, barristers and soldiers.[6] Levetts of Wychnor and Packington also served as High Sheriff of Staffordshire
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Archibald Kennedy, 11th Earl Of Cassilis
Captain Archibald Kennedy, 11th Earl of Cassilis (bef. 1736 – 30 December 1794) was a Scottish peer who lived in the United States.Contents1 Biography1.1 Peerage2 Personal life2.1 Descendants3 ReferencesBiography[edit] Kennedy was the son of Archibald Kennedy (1685–1763) and Maria Walter (1689–1764), the daughter of Robert Walter and Catharine Leisler, who in turn was the daughter of New York colonial governor, Jacob Leisler.[1] His mother had previously been married to Arent Schuyler (1662–1730), who died before they had children.[2] His father was a descendant of the second son of the 3rd earl, Gilbert Kennedy, 3rd Earl of Cassilis (1515–1558). He lived in New York City at 1 Broadway in the Kennedy mansion[3] until he was recalled to succeed to the Earldom on the death of the 10th Earl, who had died without male issue in 1792. Peerage[edit] He succeeded to the titles of 11th Earl of Cassilis, and 13th Lord Kennedy on 18 December 1792
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Croydon
Croydon
Croydon
is a large town in the south of Greater London, England, 9.5 miles (15.3 km) south of Charing Cross. The principal settlement in the London Borough of Croydon, it is one of the largest commercial districts outside Central London, with an extensive shopping district and night-time economy.[2] Its population of 52,104 at the 2011 census includes the wards of Addiscombe, Broad Green, and Fairfield. Historically part of the hundred of Wallington in the county of Surrey, at the time of the Norman conquest of England
England
Croydon
Croydon
had a church, a mill, and around 365 inhabitants, as recorded in the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086.[3] Croydon
Croydon
expanded in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
as a market town and a centre for charcoal production, leather tanning and brewing
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George Richmond (painter)
George Richmond RA (28 March 1809 – 19 March 1896) was an English painter and portraitist. In his youth he was a member of The Ancients, a group of followers of William Blake
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