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Charles K. Kao
Sir Charles Kuen Kao,[5] GBM,[6] KBE,[7] FRS,[8] FREng[9] (born 4 November 1933) is a Chinese-born Shanghainese electrical engineer and physicist who pioneered the development and use of fiber optics in telecommunications
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Wade–Giles
Wade–Giles (/ˌweɪd ˈdʒaɪlz/), sometimes abbreviated Wade,[citation needed] is a Romanization system for Mandarin Chinese. It developed from a system produced by Thomas Wade, during the mid-19th century, and was given completed form with Herbert A. Giles's Chinese–English Dictionary of 1892. Wade–Giles was the system of transcription in the English-speaking world for most of the 20th century, used in standard reference books and in English language books published before 1979. It replaced the Nanking dialect-based romanization systems that had been common until the late 19th century, such as the Postal Romanization (still used in some place-names). In mainland China it has been entirely replaced by the Hànyǔ Pīnyīn system approved in 1958. Outside mainland China, it has mostly been replaced by Pīnyīn, even though Taiwan implements a multitude of Romanization systems in daily life
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Physics
Physics
Physics
(from Ancient Greek: φυσική (ἐπιστήμη), translit. physikḗ (epistḗmē), lit. 'knowledge of nature', from φύσις phýsis "nature"[1][2][3]) is the natural science that studies matter[4] and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force.[5] Physics
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Knight Commander Of The Most Excellent Order Of The British Empire
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire
British Empire
is a British order of chivalry, rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the Civil service.[2] It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V, and comprises five classes across both civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male or dame if female.[3] There is also the related British Empire Medal, whose recipients are affiliated with, but not members of, the order. Recommendations for appointments to the Order of the British Empire were at first made on the nomination of the United Kingdom, the self-governing Dominions
Dominions
of the Empire (later Commonwealth) and the Viceroy of India
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SPIE Gold Medal
A medal or medallion is a small portable artistic object, a thin disc, normally of metal, carrying a design, usually on both sides. They typically have a commemorative purpose of some kind, and many are given as awards. They may be intended to be worn, suspended from clothing or jewellery in some way. They are traditionally struck like a coin by dies. A medal may be awarded to a person or organization as a form of recognition for sporting, military, scientific, cultural, academic, or various other achievements. Military awards and decorations
Military awards and decorations
are more precise terms for certain types of state decoration. Medals may also be created for sale to commemorate particular individuals or events, or as works of artistic expression in their own right
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CBE
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire
British Empire
is a British order of chivalry, rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the Civil service.[2] It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V, and comprises five classes across both civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male or dame if female.[3] There is also the related British Empire Medal, whose recipients are affiliated with, but not members of, the order. Recommendations for appointments to the Order of the British Empire were at first made on the nomination of the United Kingdom, the self-governing Dominions
Dominions
of the Empire (later Commonwealth) and the Viceroy of India
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Prince Philip Medal
The Prince Philip Medal is named after Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, who is the Senior Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering (RAE). In 1989 Prince Philip agreed to the commissioning of solid gold medals to be "awarded periodically to an engineer of any nationality who has made an exceptional contribution to engineering as a whole through practice, management or education."[1] The first of these medals was awarded in 1991 to Air Commodore Sir Frank Whittle. Another medal also known as the Prince Philip medal is the City and Guilds Institute of London Gold Medal, awarded by the City & Guilds. This was awarded to Jocelyn Burton, the first woman recipient, in 2003 for outstanding achievements in the fields of science and engineering. Previous recipients of the RAE medal have included:Prince Philip Medal winnersYear Name Topics2016 Dr Jonathan Ingram Awarded for building and implementing the technology called Building Information Modelling (BIM)
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Japan Prize
Coordinates: 35°N 136°E / 35°N 136°E / 35; 136Japan 日本国 Nippon-koku or Nihon-kokuFlagImperial SealAnthem: "Kimigayo" 君が代"His Imperial Majesty's Reign"[2][3] Government
Government
Seal of JapanGo-Shichi no Kiri (五七桐)Area controlled by Japan
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3463 Kaokuen
This is a partial list of minor planets, running from 3001 through 4000, inclusive. For an overview of the entire catalog of numbered minor planets, see main index. Also see the corresponding list meanings of minor planet names: 3001–4000 for details on any named body in this range.  Near-Earth obj.     MBA (inner)   MBA (outer)   Centaur  Mars-crosser   MBA (middle)     Jupiter trojan    Trans-Neptunian obj.Contents – back to main index3,001… 3,101… 3,201… 3,301… 3,401… 3,501… 3,601… 3,701… 3,801… 3,901…1–1000 1000s 2000s 3000s 4000s 5000s 6000s 7000s 8000s 9000s 10,000s3001–3100[edit]Designation Discovery Discoverer(s) Category Ref · MeaningPermanent Provisional Date Site3001 Michelangelo 1982 BC1 January 24, 1982 Anderson Mesa E. Bowell — MPC · 30013002 Delasalle 1982 FB3 March 20, 1982 La Silla H
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KBE
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire
British Empire
is a British order of chivalry, rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the Civil service.[2] It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V, and comprises five classes across both civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male or dame if female.[3] There is also the related British Empire Medal, whose recipients are affiliated with, but not members of, the order. Recommendations for appointments to the Order of the British Empire were at first made on the nomination of the United Kingdom, the self-governing Dominions
Dominions
of the Empire (later Commonwealth) and the Viceroy of India
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Yale University
Yale University
Yale University
is an American private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in New Haven, Connecticut. Founded in 1701, it is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States
United States
and one of the nine Colonial Colleges
Colonial Colleges
chartered before the American Revolution.[6] Chartered by Connecticut
Connecticut
Colony, the "Collegiate School" was established by clergy in Saybrook Colony
Saybrook Colony
to educate Congregational ministers. It moved to New Haven
New Haven
in 1716 and shortly after was renamed Yale College
Yale College
in recognition of a gift from British East India Company governor Elihu Yale
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C&C Prize
C&C Prizes (Japanese: C&C賞) is an award given by the NEC Corporation "in recognition of outstanding contributions to research and development and/or pioneering work in the fields of semiconductors, computers, telecommunications and their integrated technologies."[1] Established in 1985, through the NEC's nonprofit C&C Foundation, C&C Prizes are awarded to two groups or individuals annually. The prize includes a cash award of 10,000,000 yen. Recipients[edit]2016 RecipientsGroup A: Hideo Ohno Group B: Geoffrey Hinton2015 RecipientsGroup A: Prof. Masaru Kitsuregawa Group B: Dr. Martin Casado, Prof. Nick McKeown, Prof. Scott Shenker2014 RecipientsGroup A: Prof. Shigeo Tsujii (ja), Dr. Hideki Imai Group B: Dr. Jan Uddenfeldt, Dr. Irwin M. Jacobs, Prof. Fumiyuki Adachi2013 RecipientsGroup A: Prof. Kazuro Kikuchi, Masataka Nakazawa (de) Group B: Prof. Vladimir Vapnik2012 RecipientsGroup A: Dr. Osamu Yamada, Dr. Toru Kuroda, Mr
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Doctoral Advisor
A doctoral advisor (also dissertation director or dissertation advisor) is a member of a university faculty whose role is to guide graduate students who are candidates for a doctorate, helping them select coursework, as well as shaping, refining and directing the students' choice of sub-discipline in which they will be examined or on which they will write a dissertation.[1] Students generally choose advisors based on their areas of interest within their discipline, their desire to work closely with particular graduate faculty, and the willingness and availability of those faculty to work with them. In some countries, the student's advisor serves as the chair of the doctoral examination or dissertation committees. In some cases, though, the person who serves those roles may be different from the faculty member who has most closely advised the student
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Harold Barlow
Harold Everard Monteagle Barlow FRS[1] (15 November 1899 – 20 April 1989) was a British engineer. He was born in Islington, London, the son of Leonard Barlow, an electrical engineer. He entered University College, London
University College, London
where, apart from the World War II years (which he spent ar Royal Aircraft Establishment, Farnborough), he spent most of his working life. He was taught by Ambrose Fleming, who held the Pender Chair
Pender Chair
there. Barlow went on to succeed Fleming in that chair, and hence also in the post of head of department
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Chinese Name
Chinese personal names are names used by those from mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, and the Chinese diaspora
Chinese diaspora
overseas. Due to China's historical dominance of East Asian culture, many names used in Korea and Vietnam are adaptations of Chinese names, or have historical roots in Chinese, with appropriate adaptation to accommodate linguistic differences. Modern Chinese names consist of a surname known as xing (姓, xìng), which comes first and is usually but not always monosyllabic, followed by a personal name called ming (名, míng), which is nearly always mono- or disyllabic
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Chinese Surname
Chinese surnames are used by Han Chinese
Han Chinese
and Sinicized ethnic groups in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Malaysia, Brunei, Taiwan, Korea, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam
Vietnam
and among overseas Chinese communities. In ancient times two types of surnames existed, namely xing (Chinese: 姓; pinyin: xìng) or clan names, and shi (Chinese: 氏; pinyin: shì) or lineage names. Chinese family names are patrilineal, passed from father to children (in adoption, the adoptee usually also takes the same surname). Women do not normally change their surnames upon marriage, except in places with more Western influences such as Hong Kong. Traditionally Chinese surnames have been exogamous.[1][2] The colloquial expressions laobaixing (老百姓; lit. "old hundred surnames") and bǎixìng (百姓, lit
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