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Charles Dunoyer
Charles Dunoyer (Barthélemy-Charles-Pierre-Joseph Dunoyer de Segonzac, 20 May 1786, Carennac, Quercy
Quercy
(now in Lot) – 4 December 1862, Paris) was a French liberal economist. Dunoyer gave one of the earliest theories of economic cycle, building on the theory of periodic crises of Jean Charles Léonard de Sismondi, and introducing the notion of the economy periodically cycling between two phases.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Bibliography 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksBiography[edit] Together with Charles Comte, in 1814, Dunoyer founded the journal Le Censeur, a platform for liberal ideas
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Carennac
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Carennac
Carennac
is a commune in the Lot department in south-western France. Carennac
Carennac
belongs to the historical region of Quercy. A village lies in the fertile valley of the Dordogne River, nestled under the barren, parched plateau locally named 'le Causse'. Its most remarkable landmarks are a medieval priory, combining an 11th-century church and cloister, and a 16th-century castle, in which famous author of The Adventures of Telemachus, François Fénelon, lived from 1681 to 1685
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Encyclopædia Britannica
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
( Latin
Latin
for "British Encyclopaedia"), published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., is a general knowledge English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia. It is written by about 100 full-time editors and more than 4,000 contributors, who have included 110 Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
winners and five American presidents. The 2010 version of the 15th edition, which spans 32 volumes[1] and 32,640 pages, was the last printed edition; digital content and distribution has continued since then. The Britannica is the oldest English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia still in production. It was first published between 1768 and 1771 in the Scottish capital of Edinburgh, as three volumes
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Adam Smith
Adam Smith
Adam Smith
FRSA (16 June 1723 NS (5 June 1723 OS) – 17 July 1790) was a Scottish economist, philosopher and author as well as a moral philosopher, a pioneer of political economy and a key figure during the Scottish Enlightenment
Scottish Enlightenment
era.[1] Smith is best known for two classic works: An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776) and The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759). The former, usually abbreviated as The Wealth of Nations, is considered his magnum opus and the first modern work of economics.[2] Smith studied social philosophy at the University of Glasgow
University of Glasgow
and at Balliol College, Oxford, where he was one of the first students to benefit from scholarships set up by fellow Scot, John Snell
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Ronald Hamowy
Ronald
Ronald
(/ˈrɒnld/)[1] is a masculine given name derived from the Old Norse Rögnvaldr.[2] In some cases Ronald
Ronald
is an
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SAGE Publications
SAGE Publishing is an independent publishing company founded in 1965 in New York by Sara Miller McCune and now based in California. It publishes more than 1,000 journals, more than 800 books a year,[1] reference works and electronic products covering business, humanities, social sciences, science, technology and medicine
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Cato Institute
The Cato Institute
Cato Institute
is an American libertarian
American libertarian
think tank headquartered in
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Quercy
Quercy
Quercy
(French: [kɛʁsi] ( listen); Occitan: Carcin [kaɾˈsi], locally [kɔɾˈʃi]) is a former province of France located in the country's southwest, bounded on the north by Limousin, on the west by Périgord
Périgord
and Agenais, on the south by Gascony
Gascony
and Languedoc, and on the east by Rouergue
Rouergue
and Auvergne.Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Notable associations 4 Famous personalities from Quercy 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] Quercy
Quercy
comprised the present-day department of Lot, the northern half of the department of Tarn-et-Garonne, and a few communities in the departments of Dordogne, Corrèze, and Aveyron. The traditional capital of Quercy
Quercy
is Cahors, now prefecture (capital) of Lot
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OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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Journal Of Libertarian Studies
The Journal of Libertarian Studies (JLS) was a scholarly journal published by the Ludwig von Mises Institute
Ludwig von Mises Institute
and Lew Rockwell. It was established in the spring of 1977 by Murray Rothbard
Murray Rothbard
who also served as its editor until his death in 1995. The journal had been published by the Center for Libertarian Studies, but moved to the Mises Institute in 2000
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Goodreads
Goodreads
Goodreads
is a "social cataloging" website that allows individuals to freely search its database of books, annotations, and reviews. Users can sign up and register books to generate library catalogs and reading lists. They can also create their own groups of book suggestions, surveys, polls, blogs, and discussions. The website's offices are located in San Francisco.[2] The company is currently owned by the online retailer Amazon. Goodreads
Goodreads
was founded in December 2006 and launched in January 2007 by Otis Chandler, a software engineer and entrepreneur, and Elizabeth Khuri.[3][4] The website grew rapidly in popularity after being launched
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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