HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Charles Dickens
CHARLES JOHN HUFFAM DICKENS (/ˈdɪkɪnz/ ; 7 February 1812 – 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era
Victorian era
. His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the 20th century critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories enjoy lasting popularity. Born in Portsmouth
Portsmouth
, Dickens left school to work in a factory when his father was incarcerated in a debtors\' prison . Despite his lack of formal education, he edited a weekly journal for 20 years, wrote 15 novels, five novellas, hundreds of short stories and non-fiction articles, lectured and performed readings extensively, was an indefatigable letter writer, and campaigned vigorously for children's rights, education, and other social reforms
[...More...]

"Charles Dickens" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Picaresque Novel
The PICARESQUE NOVEL (Spanish : "picaresca", from "pícaro", for "rogue " or "rascal") is a genre of prose fiction that depicts the adventures of a roguish hero /heroine of low social class who lives by his or her wits in a corrupt society. Picaresque novels typically adopt a realistic style, with elements of comedy and satire . This style of novel originated in 16th-century Spain
Spain
and flourished throughout Europe
Europe
in the 17th and 18th centuries. It continues to influence modern literature. According to the traditional view of Thrall and Hibbard (first published in 1936), seven qualities distinguish the picaresque novel or narrative form, all or some of which an author may employ for effect: * A picaresque narrative is usually written in first person as an autobiographical account. * The main character is often of low character or social class
[...More...]

"Picaresque Novel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Westminster Abbey
WESTMINSTER ABBEY, formally titled the COLLEGIATE CHURCH OF ST PETER AT WESTMINSTER, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster , London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster . It is one of the United Kingdom's most notable religious buildings and the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs. Between 1540 and 1556, the abbey had the status of a cathedral . Since 1560, however, the building is no longer an abbey nor a cathedral, having instead the status of a Church of England " Royal Peculiar "—a church responsible directly to the sovereign. The building itself is the original abbey church
[...More...]

"Westminster Abbey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oscar Wilde
OSCAR FINGAL O\'FLAHERTIE WILLS WILDE (16 October 1854 – 30 November 1900) was a prolific Irish writer who wrote plays, fiction, essays and poetry. After writing in different forms throughout the 1880s, he became one of London's most popular playwrights in the early 1890s. He is best remembered for his epigrams and plays, the novel The Picture of Dorian Gray , as well as the circumstances of his imprisonment and early death. Wilde's parents were successful Anglo-Irish
Anglo-Irish
, Dublin
Dublin
intellectuals . Their son became fluent in French and German early in life. At university, Wilde read Greats ; he proved himself to be an outstanding classicist, first at Dublin
Dublin
, then at Oxford . He became known for his involvement in the rising philosophy of aestheticism , led by two of his tutors, Walter Pater and John Ruskin
[...More...]

"Oscar Wilde" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Realism (arts)
REALISM in the arts is the attempt to represent subject matter truthfully, without artificiality and avoiding artistic conventions, implausible, exotic and supernatural elements. Realism has been prevalent in the arts at many periods, and is in large part a matter of technique and training, and the avoidance of stylization. In the visual arts, illusionistic realism is the accurate depiction of lifeforms, perspective, and the details of light and colour. Realist works of art may emphasize the mundane, ugly or sordid, such as works of social realism , regionalism , or kitchen sink realism . There have been various realism movements in the arts, such as the opera style of verismo , literary realism , theatrical realism and Italian neorealist cinema . The realism art movement in painting began in France in the 1850s, after the 1848 Revolution
[...More...]

"Realism (arts)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sheerness
SHEERNESS /ʃɪərˈnɛs/ is a town located beside the mouth of the River Medway on the north-west corner of the Isle of Sheppey
Isle of Sheppey
in north Kent
Kent
, England. With a population of 12,000 it is the largest town on the island. Sheerness
Sheerness
began as a fort built in the 16th century to protect the River Medway from naval invasion. In 1665, plans were first laid by the Navy Board
Navy Board
for Sheerness Dockyard
Sheerness Dockyard
, a facility where warships might be provisioned and repaired. The site was favoured by Samuel Pepys , then Clerk of the Acts of the navy, for shipbuilding over Chatham
[...More...]

"Sheerness" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Halfpenny (British Pre-decimal Coin)
The British pre-decimal HALFPENNY (½D) coin, usually simply known as a HALFPENNY (pronounced /ˈheɪpəni/ HAY-pə-nee ), was a unit of currency that equalled half of a penny or 1/480th of a pound sterling . Originally the halfpenny was minted in copper, but after 1860 it was minted in bronze. It ceased to be legal tender in 1969, in the run-up to decimalisation. The halfpenny featured two different designs on its reverse during its years in circulation. From 1672 until 1936 the image of Britannia
Britannia
appeared on the reverse, and from 1937 onwards the image of the Golden Hind
Golden Hind
appeared. Like all British coinage, it bore the portrait of the monarch on the obverse. "Halfpenny" was colloquially written ha’penny, and "1½d" was spoken as "a penny ha’penny" /əˈpɛniˈheɪpni/ or three ha'pence /θriːˈheɪpəns/
[...More...]

"Halfpenny (British Pre-decimal Coin)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Chiropodist
PODIATRY (/poʊˈdaɪətri/ ) or PODIATRIC MEDICINE (/poʊdiˈætrɪk/ or /poʊˈdaɪətrɪk/ ) is a branch of medicine devoted to the study, diagnosis, and medical and surgical treatment of disorders of the foot , ankle and lower extremity . The term podiatry came into use in the early 20th century in the United States and is now used worldwide, including countries such as the United Kingdom and Australia . Podiatry is practiced as a specialty in many countries, while in many English-speaking countries, the older title of CHIROPODIST may be used by some clinicians (not to be confused with chiropractic , which is unrelated). In Australia, graduates of recognised academic programs can register through the Podiatry Board of Australia as a "podiatrist', and those with additional recognised training may also receive endorsement to prescribe or administer restricted medications, and/or seek specialist registration as a 'podiatric surgeon'
[...More...]

"Chiropodist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Oral Interpretation
ORAL INTERPRETATION is a dramatic art, also commonly called "interpretive reading" and "dramatic reading", though these terms are more conservative and restrictive. In certain applications, oral interpretation is also a theatre art – as in reader's theatre, in which a work of literature is performed with manuscripts in hand or, more traditionally, using stools and music stands; and especially chamber theatre, which dispenses with manuscripts and uses what may be described as essentialist costuming and stage lighting, and suggestive scenery. The term is succinctly defined by Paul Campbell (The Speaking and Speakers of Literature; Dickinson, 1967) as the "oralization of literature"; or more eloquently, if less intelligibly, by Charlotte Lee and Timothy Gura (Oral Interpretation; Houghton-Mifflin, 1997) as "the art of communicating to an audience a work of literary art in its intellectual, emotional, and aesthetic entirety"
[...More...]

"Oral Interpretation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cliffhanger
A CLIFFHANGER, or CLIFFHANGER ENDING, is a plot device in fiction which features a main character in a precarious or difficult dilemma, or confronted with a shocking revelation at the end of an episode of serialized fiction. A cliffhanger is hoped to ensure the audience will return to see how the characters resolve the dilemma. Some serials end with the caveat "To Be Continued…" or "The End?" In movie serials and television series the following episode sometimes begins with a recap sequence . CONTENTS * 1 Origin * 2 Serial media * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 Books * 6 External links ORIGINThe term "cliffhanger" is considered to have originated with the serialised version of Thomas Hardy's A Pair of Blue Eyes (which was published in Tinsley\'s Magazine between September 1872 and July 1873) in which Henry Knight, one of the protagonists, is left literally hanging off a cliff
[...More...]

"Cliffhanger" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Virginia Woolf
ADELINE VIRGINIA WOOLF (née STEPHEN; 25 January 1882 – 28 March 1941) was an English writer who is considered one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century, and a pioneer in the use of stream of consciousness as a narrative device . Born in an affluent household in Kensington
Kensington
, London, she attended the King\'s College London and was acquainted with the early reformers of women's higher education. Having been home-schooled for most part of her childhood, mostly in English classics and Victorian literature , Woolf began writing professionally in 1900. During the interwar period , Woolf was a significant figure in London literary society and a central figure in the influential Bloomsbury Group of intellectuals. She published her first novel titled The Voyage Out in 1915, through the Hogarth Press , a publishing house that she established with her husband, Leonard Woolf
[...More...]

"Virginia Woolf" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Leo Tolstoy
COUNT LEV NIKOLAYEVICH TOLSTOY (/ˈtoʊlstɔɪ, ˈtɒl-/ ; Russian : Лев Никола́евич Толсто́й, Lev Nikolajevič Tolstoj, pronounced ( listen ); 9 September 1828 – 20 November 1910), usually referred to in English as LEO TOLSTOY, was a Russian writer who is regarded as one of the greatest authors of all time. Born to an aristocratic Russian family in 1828, he is best known for the novels War and Peace
War and Peace
(1869) and Anna Karenina
Anna Karenina
(1877), often cited as pinnacles of realist fiction. He first achieved literary acclaim in his twenties with his semi-autobiographical trilogy, Childhood , Boyhood , and Youth (1852–1856), and Sevastopol Sketches (1855), based upon his experiences in the Crimean War
Crimean War

[...More...]

"Leo Tolstoy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chatham, Medway
CHATHAM (/ˈtʃætəm/ CHAT-əm ) is one of the Medway
Medway
towns located within the Medway
Medway
unitary authority, in North Kent
Kent
, in South East England
England
. Chatham Dockyard
Chatham Dockyard
closed in 1984, but major naval buildings remain as the focus for a flourishing tourist industry. Following closure, part of the site became a commercial port, other parts were redeveloped for business and residential use, and part became the Chatham Historic Dockyard museum, which features the submarine HMS Ocelot among a good many other attractions. Chatham also has military connections; several Army barracks were located here, together with 19th-century forts which provided a defensive shield for the dockyard. Brompton Barracks , located in the town, remains the headquarters of the Corps of Royal Engineers
[...More...]

"Chatham, Medway" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fitzrovia
FITZROVIA (/fɪtsˈroʊviə/ ) is a district in central London , near London's West End lying partly in the City of Westminster
City of Westminster
(in the west), and partly in the London Borough of Camden
London Borough of Camden
(in the east); and situated between Bloomsbury
Bloomsbury
and Marylebone
Marylebone
, and north of Soho
Soho
. It is characterised by its mixed-use of residential, business, retail, education and healthcare, with no single activity dominating. The historically bohemian area was once home to such writers as Virginia Woolf , George Bernard Shaw
George Bernard Shaw
and Arthur Rimbaud
Arthur Rimbaud

[...More...]

"Fitzrovia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kent
KENT /kɛnt/ is a county in South East England
England
and one of the home counties . It borders Greater London
Greater London
to the north west, Surrey
Surrey
to the west and East Sussex
East Sussex
to the south west. The county also shares borders with Essex
Essex
along the estuary of the River Thames
River Thames
, and with the French department of Pas-de-Calais along the English Channel
English Channel
. The county town is Maidstone
Maidstone

[...More...]

"Kent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Henry James
HENRY JAMES, OM ((1843-04-15)15 April 1843 – 28 February 1916(1916-02-28)) was an American author, who largely relocated to Europe as a young man and acquired British citizenship near the end of his life. James is regarded as a key transitional figure between literary realism and literary modernism , and is considered by many to be among the greatest novelists in the English language. He was the son of Henry James, Sr. and the brother of renowned philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James . He is best known for a number of novels dealing with the social and marital interplay between emigre Americans, English people, and continental Europeans – examples of such novels include Portrait of a Lady , The Ambassadors , and The Wings of the Dove . His later works were increasingly experimental
[...More...]

"Henry James" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.