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Charles A. Beard
Charles Austin Beard (November 27, 1874 – September 1, 1948) was, with Frederick Jackson Turner, one of the most influential American historians of the first half of the 20th century. For a while he was a history professor at Columbia University
Columbia University
but his influence came from hundreds of monographs, textbooks and interpretive studies in both history and political science. His works included a radical re-evaluation of the founding fathers of the United States, who he believed were motivated more by economics than by philosophical principles. Beard's most influential book, An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution of the United States (1913), has been the subject of great controversy ever since its publication
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Westchester County, New York
Westchester County is a county in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York. It is the second-most populous county on the mainland of New York, after the Bronx,[5](p6) and the most populous county in the state north of New York City. According to the 2010 Census, the county had a population of 949,113, estimated to have increased by 3.3% to 980,244 by 2017.[1] Situated in the Hudson Valley, Westchester covers an area of 450 square miles (1,200 km2), consisting of six cities, 19 towns, and 23 villages. Established in 1683, Westchester was named after the city of Chester, England.[6][7] The county seat is the city of White Plains, while the most populous municipality in the county is the city of Yonkers, with an estimated 200,807 residents in 2016.[8] The annual per capita income for Westchester was $67,813 in 2011
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United States Non-interventionism
Non-interventionism, the diplomatic policy whereby a nation seeks to avoid alliances with other nations in order to avoid being drawn into wars not related to direct territorial self-defense, has had a long history of popularity in the government and among the people of the United States
United States
at various periods in time.Contents1 Background 2 No entangling alliances (19th century) 3 20th century non-interventionism3.1 Between the World Wars 3.2 Non-inte
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Constitutional Convention (United States)
The Constitutional Convention[1]:31 (also known as the Philadelphia Convention,[1]:31 the Federal Convention,[1]:31 or the Grand Convention at Philadelphia[2][3]) took place from May 25 to September 17, 1787, in the old Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State House (later known as Independence Hall
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Just War
Just war theory
Just war theory
(Latin: jus bellum iustum) is a doctrine, also referred to as a tradition, of military ethics studied by military leaders, theologians, ethicists and policy makers. The purpose of the doctrine is to ensure war is morally justifiable through a series of criteria, all of which must be met for a war to be considered just. The criteria are split into two groups: "right to go to war" (jus ad bellum) and "right conduct in war" (jus in bello). The first concerns the morality of going to war, and the second the moral conduct within war.[1] Recently there have been calls for the inclusion of a third category of Just War
War
theory—jus post bellum—dealing with the morality of post-war settlement and reconstruction. Just War
War
theory postulates that war, while terrible, is not always the worst option
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Royalties
A royalty is a payment made by one party, the licensee or franchisee to another that owns a particular asset, the licensor or franchisor for the right to ongoing use of that asset. Royalties are typically agreed upon as a percentage of gross or net revenues derived from the use of an asset or a fixed price per unit sold of an item of such, but there are also other modes and metrics of compensation.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7] A royalty interest is the right to collect a stream of future royalty payments.[8] A license agreement defines the terms under which a resource or property are licensed by one party to another, either without restriction or subject to a limitation on term, business or geographic territory, type of product, etc. License agreements can be regulated, particularly where a government is the resource owner, or they can be private contracts that follow a general structure
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Greenwich Village
Greenwich Village
Greenwich Village
(/ˈɡrɛnɪtʃ/ GREN-itch, /ˈɡrɪn-/ GRIN-, /-ɪdʒ/ -ij)[4] often referred to by locals as simply "the Village", is a neighborhood on the west side of Lower Manhattan, New York City. Greenwich Village
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1923 Great Kantō Earthquake
The Great Kantō earthquake (関東大震災, Kantō daishinsai) struck the Kantō Plain
Kantō Plain
on the Japanese main island of Honshū
Honshū
at 11:58:44 JST (02:58:44 UTC) on Saturday, September 1, 1923. Varied accounts indicate the duration of the earthquake was between four and ten minutes.[11] The earthquake had a magnitude of 7.9 on the moment magnitude scale (Mw),[12] with its focus deep beneath Izu Ōshima
Izu Ōshima
Island in Sagami Bay
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New Deal
The New Deal
New Deal
was a series of federal programs, public work projects, financial reforms and regulations enacted in the United States
United States
during the 1930s in response to the Great Depression. Some of these federal programs included the Civilian Conservation Corps
Civilian Conservation Corps
(CCC), the Civil Works Administration (CWA), the Farm Security Administration
Farm Security Administration
(FSA), the National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933
National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933
(NIRA) and the Social Security Administration (SSA).[1][2][3][4][5] These programs included support for farmers, the unemployed, youth and the elderly as well as new constraints and safeguards on the banking industry and changes to the monetary system. Most programs were enacted between 1933–1938, though some were later
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Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Governor of New York GovernorshipPresident of the United States PresidencyFirst Term1932 campaignElection1st Inauguration First 100 daysNew Deal Glass-Steagall Act WPA Social Security SEC Fireside ChatsSecond Term1936 campaignElection2nd InaugurationSupreme Court Packing National Recovery Act 1937 Recession March of Dimes Pre-war foreign policyThird Term1940 campaignElection3rd InaugurationWorld War IIWorld War IIAttack on Pearl Harbor Infamy Speech Atlantic Charter Japanese Internment Tehran Conference United Nations D-DaySecond Bill of Rights G.I
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Isolationist
Isolationism is a category of foreign policies institutionalized by leaders who assert that their nations' best interests are best served by keeping the affairs of other countries at a distance. One possible motivation for limiting international involvement is to avoid being drawn into dangerous and otherwise undesirable conflicts
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Frederick York Powell
Frederick York Powell
Frederick York Powell
(4 January 1850 – 8 May 1904), was an English historian and scholar. Biography[edit] Frederick York Powell
Frederick York Powell
was born in Bloomsbury, London. Much of his childhood was spent in France and Spain, so that he early acquired a mastery of the language of both countries and an insight into the genius of the people. He was educated at Rugby School, and matriculated at Oxford
Oxford
as an unattached student, subsequently joining Christ Church, where he took a first-class in law and modern history in 1872. He was called to the bar at the Middle Temple
Middle Temple
in 1874, and married in the same year. He became law-lecturer and tutor of Christ Church, fellow of Oriel College, delegate of the Clarendon Press, and in 1894 he was made Regius Professor of Modern History in succession to J. A. Froude
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New Left
The New Left
New Left
was a broad political movement mainly in the 1960s and 1970s consisting of activists in the Western world
Western world
who campaigned for a broad range of reforms on is
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Gabriel Kolko
Gabriel Morris Kolko (August 17, 1932 – May 19, 2014) was an American-born Canadian historian and author.[2] His research interests included American capitalism and political history, the Progressive Era, and US foreign policy in the 20th century.[3] One of the best-known revisionist historians to write about the Cold War,[4] he had also been credited as "an incisive critic of the Progressive Era and its relationship to the American empire."[5][6] U.S
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James Weinstein (author)
James "Jimmy" Weinstein (1926–2005) was an American historian and journalist best known as the founder and publisher of In These Times. Weinstein was a lifelong socialist and early 20th-century American socialism was often the focus of his writings. Biography[edit] James Weinstein, known to his friends as "Jimmy," was born in New York City on July 17, 1926. As a young man, Weinstein was an active supporter of Henry Wallace's 1948 presidential bid on the Progressive Party ticket, a campaign strongly backed by the Communist Party. However, Weinstein later became critical of "third party" strategies and would encourage the American Left to work within the Democratic Party. Weinstein became a prominent figure among left-wing Democrats in his adopted home of Chicago, Illinois, where In These Times is headquartered. Weinstein served in the U.S. Navy and received a degree in government from Cornell University in 1949. He later attended Columbia University, obtaining an M.A
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Paleoconservatism
Paleoconservatism (sometimes shortened to paleocon) is a conservative political philosophy stressing tradition, limited government and civil society, along with religious, regional, national and Western identity.[a][1] According to the international relations scholar Michael Foley, "paleoconservatives press for restrictions on immigration, a rollback of multicultural programmes, the decentralization of the federal policy, the restoration of controls upon free trade, a greater emphasis upon economic nationalism and non-interventionism in the conduct of American foreign policy, and a generally revanchist outlook upon a social order in need of recovering old lines of distinction and in particular the assignment of roles in accordance with traditional categories of gender, ethnicity, and race".[2] Practitioners of this philosophy identify themselves as the legitimate heirs to the American conservative tradition.[3] The nativist politician Pat Buchanan was strongly influenced by the Rockfor
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