HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Chardonnay
Chardonnay
Chardonnay
(pronounced [ʃaʁ.dɔ.nɛ]) is a green-skinned grape variety used in the production of white wine. The variety originated in the Burgundy wine
Burgundy wine
region of eastern France, but is now grown wherever wine is produced, from England to New Zealand. It is also used in Italy to produce sparkling wines like Franciacorta for example. For new and developing wine regions, growing Chardonnay
Chardonnay
is seen as a "rite of passage" and an easy entry into the international wine market.[1] The Chardonnay
Chardonnay
grape itself is very neutral, with many of the flavors commonly associated with the grape being derived from such influences as terroir and oak.[2] It is vinified in many different styles, from the lean, crisply mineral wines of Chablis, France, to New World wines with oak, and tropical fruit flavors
[...More...]

"Chardonnay" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western) Nicomedia
[...More...]

"Roman Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Adelaide Hills
Coordinates: 34°54′40″S 138°42′26″E / 34.911185°S 138.70735°E / -34.911185; 138.70735This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Adelaide
Adelaide
Hills South AustraliaAutumn leaves typical of the Adelaide
Adelaide
Hills
[...More...]

"Adelaide Hills" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

University Of California, Davis
The University of California, Davis
University of California, Davis
(also referred to as UCD, UC Davis, or Davis), is a public research university and land-grant university as well as one of the 10 campuses of the University of California
California
(UC) system
[...More...]

"University Of California, Davis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

DNA Fingerprinting
DNA
DNA
profiling (also called DNA
DNA
fingerprinting, DNA
DNA
testing, or DNA typing) is the process of determining an individual's DNA characteristics, called a DNA
DNA
profile, that is very likely to be different in unrelated individuals, thereby being as unique to individuals as are fingerprints (hence the alternative name for the technique)
[...More...]

"DNA Fingerprinting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cyprus
Cyprus,[f] officially the Republic of Cyprus,[g] is an island country in the Eastern Mediterranean and the third largest and third most populous island in the Mediterranean. Cyprus
Cyprus
is located south of Turkey, west of Syria
Syria
and Lebanon, northwest of Israel, north of Egypt, and southeast of Greece. The earliest known human activity on the island dates to around the 10th millennium BC. Archaeological remains from this period include the well-preserved Neolithic
Neolithic
village of Khirokitia, and Cyprus
Cyprus
is home to some of the oldest water wells in the world.[9] Cyprus
Cyprus
was settled by Mycenaean Greeks in two waves in the 2nd millennium BC
[...More...]

"Cyprus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Indigenous (ecology)
In biogeography, a species is defined as indigenous to a given region or ecosystem if its presence in that region is the result of only natural process, with no human intervention.[1] The term is equivalent to native in less scientific usage. Every wild organism (as opposed to a domesticated organism) has its own natural range of distribution in which it is regarded as indigenous. Outside this native range, a species may be introduced by human activity; it is then referred to as an introduced species within the regions where it was anthropogenically introduced.[2] The notion of 'indigenous' is of necessity a blurred concept, and is clearly a function of both time and political boundaries. Seen over long periods of time, plants take part in the constant movement of tectonic plates - species appear and may flourish, endure or become extinct, but their distribution is never static or confined to a particular geographic location. An indigenous species is not necessarily endemic
[...More...]

"Indigenous (ecology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Crusades
After 1291Smyrniote 1343–1351 Alexandrian 1365 Savoyard 1366 Barbary 1390 Nicopolis 1396 Varna
Varna
1443 Portuguese 1481 Northern Crusades
Northern Crusades
(1147–1410)Wendish 1147 Swedish1150 1249 1293Livonian 1198–1290 Prussian 1217–1274 Lithuan
[...More...]

"Crusades" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Syria
Coordinates: 35°N 38°E / 35°N 38°E / 35; 38Syrian Arab
Arab
Republic الجمهورية العربية السورية (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-ʻArabīyah as-SūrīyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "حماة الديار" (Arabic) Humat ad-Diyar Guardians of the HomelandCapital and largest city Damascus 33°30′N 36°18′E / 33.500°N 36.300°E / 33.500; 36.300Official languages ArabicEthnic groupsSyrian Arabs Arameans Kurds Turkomans Assyrians Circassians ArmeniansReligion 87% Islam 10% Christianity 3% Druzis
[...More...]

"Syria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lebanon
Coordinates: 33°50′N 35°50′E / 33.833°N 35.833°E / 33.833; 35.833Lebanese Republic الجمهورية اللبنانية (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-LubnānīyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: كلّنا للوطن Kulluna lil-watan All Of Us, For the Country!Capital and largest city Beirut 33°54′N 35°32′E / 33.900°N 35.533°E / 33.900; 35.533Official languages Arabic[nb 1]Recognised languages FrenchDemonym LebaneseGovernment Unitary parliamentary multi-confessionalist republic[1]• PresidentMichel Aoun[2]• Prime MinisterSaad Hariri• Speaker of the ParliamentNabih BerriLegislature ParliamentEstablishment• Greater Lebanon1 September 1920• Constitution23 May 1926• Independence declared22 November 1943• Independence (Joined U
[...More...]

"Lebanon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vitis Vinifera
Vitis
Vitis
vinifera, the common grape vine, is a species of Vitis, native to the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
region, central Europe, and southwestern Asia, from Morocco
Morocco
and Portugal
Portugal
north to southern Germany
Germany
and east to northern Iran.[1] There are currently between 5,000 and 10,000 varieties of Vitis
Vitis
vinifera grapes though only a few are of commercial significance for wine and table grape production.[2] It is a liana growing to 32 m (35 yd) in length, with flaky bark. The leaves are alternate, palmately lobed, 5–20 cm (2.0–7.9 in) long and broad
[...More...]

"Vitis Vinifera" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Harold Olmo
Dr. Harold Olmo
Harold Olmo
(July 31, 1909 – June 30, 2006) was a pioneering viticulturist and professor at the University of California, Davis where he created many new grape varieties known today as Olmo grapes. In the 1950s, he helped to establish California's first quarantine facility on the UC Davis campus to permit California growers to import foreign vines. This led to an expansion of California's wine industry as more Vitis vinifera
Vitis vinifera
was introduced to the area.Contents1 Career 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] In 1955, Professor of Viticulture
Viticulture
at the University of California Harold Olmo
Harold Olmo
was in Western Australia
Western Australia
studying climatic limitations of viticulture in the Swan Valley
[...More...]

"Harold Olmo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Maynard Amerine
Maynard Amerine (1911–1998) was a pioneering researcher in the cultivation, fermentation, and sensory evaluation of wine. His academic work at the University of California at Davis is recognized internationally. His 16 books and some 400 articles contributed significantly to the development of the modern (post-Prohibition) wine industry in California; to the improvement of wine cultures in Europe, South America, and Australia; and to the professional standards for judging and tasting wine. In the early 1940s, he and his colleague Albert J. Winkler developed the Winkler scale, a technique for classifying wine growing regions based on temperatures, that continues to be used in the United States and elsewhere
[...More...]

"Maynard Amerine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pierre Galet
Pierre Galet (born January 28, 1921) is a French ampelographer and author who was an influential figure within ampelography in the 20th century and before DNA typing
DNA typing
was widely introduced. Beginning in the 1950s, Pierre Galet introduced a system for identifying varieties based on the shape, contours and characteristics of the leaves of the vines, petioles, growing shoots, shoot tips, grape clusters, as well as the colour, size, seed content and flavour of the grapes.[1] The impact and comprehensiveness of his work earned him the consideration as the "father of modern ampelography".[2] He started publishing within ampelography in the 1950s and his Ph.D. thesis was presented in 1967
[...More...]

"Pierre Galet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ampelographer
Ampelography
Ampelography
(ἄμπελος, "vine" + γράφος, 'writing') is the field of botany concerned with the identification and classification of grapevines, Vitis
Vitis
spp. Traditionally this has been done by comparing the shape and colour of the vine leaves and grape berries; more recently the study of vines has been revolutionised by DNA fingerprinting.Contents1 Early history 2 Pierre Galet 3 Illustrated Historical Universal Ampelography 4 DNA 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEarly history[edit]This section possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed. (November 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)The grape vine is an extremely variable species and some varieties, such as Pinot, mutate particularly frequently
[...More...]

"Ampelographer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Airén
Airén
Airén
is a variety of Vitis vinifera, a white grape commonly used in winemaking. This grape is native to Spain
Spain
where it represents about 30% of all grapes grown. As of 2010, Airén
Airén
was estimated to be the world's 3rd most grown grape variety in terms of planted surface, at 252,000 hectares (620,000 acres), down from 306,000 hectares (760,000 acres) in 2004, where it held 1st place, although it is almost exclusively found in Spain.[1] Since Airén
Airén
tends to be planted at a low density, several other varieties (including Cabernet Sauvignon
Cabernet Sauvignon
and Merlot) are more planted in terms of number of vines. Plantations of Airén
Airén
are declining as it is being replaced in Spanish vineyards with various red varieties, such as Tempranillo
[...More...]

"Airén" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.