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Chaplain
A chaplain is a cleric (such as a minister, priest, pastor, rabbi, or imam), or a lay representative of a religious tradition, attached to a secular institution such as a hospital, prison, military unit, school, business, police department, fire department, university, or private chapel. Though originally the word chaplain referred to representatives of the Christian
Christian
faith,[1][2] it is now also applied to people of other religions or philosophical traditions–such as the case of chaplains serving with military forces
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American Revolutionary War
Allied victory:Peace of Paris British recognition of American independence End of the First British Empire British retention of Canada
Canada
and GibraltarTerritorial changesGreat Britain cedes to the United States
United States
the area east of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and south of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and St
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Saint Peter
Saint
Saint
Peter (Syriac/Aramaic: ܫܸܡܥܘܿܢ ܟܹ݁ܐܦ݂ܵܐ, Shemayon Keppa, Hebrew: שמעון בר יונה‎ Shim'on bar Yona, Greek: Πέτρος Petros, Coptic: ⲡⲉⲧⲣⲟⲥ, translit. Petros, Latin: Petrus; r. AD 30;[1] d. between AD 64 and 68[2]), also known as Simon Peter, Simeon, or Simon ( pronunciation (help·info)), according to the New Testament, was one of the Twelve Apostles
Twelve Apostles
of Jesus
Jesus
Christ, leaders of the early Christian Great Church. Pope
Pope
Gregory I called him repeatedly the "Prince of the Apostles".[3] According to Catholic teaching, Jesus promised Peter in the "Rock of My Church" dialogue in Matthew 16:18 a special position in the Church
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Lay Brother
In the past, the term lay brother was used within some Catholic religious institutes to distinguish members who were not ordained from those members who were clerics (priests and seminarians). This term is now considered controversial by some because of the history of inequality between Brothers and clerics. The term "lay" has also been used in the past to designate someone as "uneducated" in contrast to "illiterate". Instead, the term "religious Brother" or simply "Brother" is appropriate when referring to a vowed male religious who is neither priest, deacon, nor seminarian. The vocational title "Brother" is generally capitalized in order to distinguish it from the generic use of the biologically relational term "brother". In religious communities today, religious Brothers are no longer restricted by the institutional inequalities of the past and enjoy the same status, rights, and opportunities as their priest and seminarian confreres, except where sacramental ministry is concerned
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Manasseh Cutler
Manasseh Cutler
Manasseh Cutler
(May 13, 1742 – July 28, 1823) was an American clergyman involved in the American Revolutionary War. Cutler was also a member of the United States
United States
House of Representatives. Cutler is “rightly entitled to be called ‘The Father of Ohio University.’”[1]Another portrait of Manasseh CutlerCutler was born in Killingly, Connecticut. In 1765, he graduated from Yale
Yale
College and after being a school teacher in Dedham, Massachusetts and a merchant – and occasionally appearing in court as a lawyer – he decided to enter the ministry
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Ohio University
Ohio
Ohio
University is a large, primarily residential public research university in Athens, Ohio, United States.[7] The first university chartered by an Act of Congress[8] and the oldest in Ohio,[9] it was chartered in 1787 and subsequently reapproved for the territory in 1802 and state in 1804,[10] opening for students in 1809.[11] As of 2016[update], the university's total enrollment, including all campuses, was more than 36,800.[12] Ohio
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Continental Army
The Continental Army
Continental Army
was formed by the Second Continental Congress after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War
American Revolutionary War
by the colonies that became the United States
United States
of America. Established by a resolution of the Congress on June 14, 1775, it was created to coordinate the military efforts of the Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
in their revolt against the rule of Great Britain. The Continental Army
Continental Army
was supplemented by local militias and troops that remained under control of the individual states or were otherwise independent
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Coarb
A coarb, from the Old Irish comarbae (Modern Irish comharba), meaning "heir" or "successor",[1] was a distinctive office of the later medieval church among the Gaels
Gaels
of Ireland and Scotland. In this period coarb appears interchangeable with "erenach", denoting the episcopally nominated lay guardian of a parish church and headman of the family in hereditary occupation of church lands. The coarb, however, often had charge of a church which had held comparatively high rank in pre‐Norman Ireland, or one still possessed of relatively extensive termon lands.[2] Also as per this article "..
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Auxiliary Bishop
An auxiliary bishop is a bishop assigned to assist the diocesan bishop in meeting the pastoral and administrative needs of the diocese. Auxiliary bishops are titular bishops of sees that no longer exist. In Catholic Church, auxiliary bishops exist in both the Latin Church and in the Eastern Catholic Churches. The particular duties of an auxiliary bishop are given by the diocesan bishop and can vary widely depending on the auxiliary bishop, the ordinary, and the needs of the diocese. In a larger archdiocese, they might be in assigned to serve a portion of the archdiocese (sometimes called deaneries, regions, or vicariates) or to serve a particular population such as immigrants or those of a particular heritage or language
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Territorial Prelate
A territorial prelate is, in Catholic
Catholic
usage, a prelate whose geographic jurisdiction, called territorial prelature, does not belong to any diocese and is considered a particular church. The territorial prelate is sometimes called a prelate nullius, from the Latin nullius diœceseos, prelate "of no diocese," meaning the territory falls directly under the 'exempt' jurisdiction of the Holy See ( Pope
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Territorial Abbey
A territorial abbey (or territorial abbacy) is a particular church of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
comprising defined territory which is not part of a diocese but surrounds an abbey or monastery whose abbot or superior functions as ordinary for all Catholics and parishes in the territory. Such an abbot is called a territorial abbot or abbot nullius diœceseos (abbreviated abbot nullius and Latin for "abbot of no diocese"). A territorial abbot thus differs from an ordinary abbot, who exercises authority only within the monastery's walls or to monks or canons who have taken their vows there
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Consecrator
Consecrator
Consecrator
is a term used in the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
to designate a bishop who ordains a priest to the episcopal state. The term is also used in Eastern Rite Churches and in Anglican
Anglican
communities.Contents1 History 2 Validity 3 Co-Consecrators 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The church has always sought to assemble as many bishops as possible for the election and consecration of new bishops.[1] Although due to difficulties in travel, timing, and frequency of consecrations, this was reduced to the requirement that all comprovincial (of the same province) bishops participate
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Auditor (ecclesiastical)
In ecclesiastical terminology, an Auditor (from a Latin word meaning "hearer") is a person given authority to hear cases in an ecclesiastical court.Contents1 Roman Catholic Church 2 Church of England 3 Church of Scientology 4 ReferencesRoman Catholic Church[edit]Part of a series on theHierarchy of the Catholic ChurchSaint PeterEcclesiastical titles (order of precedence)Pope CardinalCardinal VicarModerator of the curia Chaplain
Chaplain
of His Holiness Papal legate Papal majordomo Apostolic Nuncio Apostolic Delegate Apostolic Syndic Apostolic visitor Vicar Apostolic Apostolic
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Brother (Catholic)
A religious brother is a member of a Christian religious institute or religious order who commits himself to following Christ in consecrated life of the Church, usually by the vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. He is a layman, in the sense of not being ordained as a deacon or priest, and usually lives in a religious community and works in a ministry appropriate to his capabilities. A brother might practice any secular occupation. The term "brother" is used as he is expected to be as a brother to others. Brothers are members of a variety of religious communities, which may be contemplative, monastic, or apostolic in character
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Chancellor (ecclesiastical)
Chancellor is an ecclesiastical title used by several quite distinct officials of some Christian churches.In some churches, the Chancellor of a diocese is a lawyer who represents the church in legal matters. In the Church of England, the Chancellor is the judge of the consistory court of the diocese
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Military Ordinariate
A military ordinariate is an ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Church, of the Latin or an Eastern Church, responsible for the pastoral care of Catholics serving in the armed forces of a nation. Until 1986, they were called "military vicariates" and had a status similar to that of apostolic vicariates, which are headed by a bishop who receives his authority by delegation from the Pope. The apostolic constitution Spirituali militum curae of 21 April 1986 raised their status, declaring that the bishop who heads one of them is an "ordinary", holding authority by virtue of his office, and not by delegation from another person in authority.[1] It likened the military vicariates to dioceses.[2] Each of them is headed by a bishop, who may have the personal rank of archbishop
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