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Chapei Dong Veng
The Chapei Dong Veng (Khmer: ចាប៉ីដងវែង) or chapey (ចាប៉ី) is a Cambodian two-stringed, long-necked guitar that is usually plucked. It has two double courses of nylon strings.[1][2] The top and bottom strings are typically tuned to G and C respectively, with the 12 frets having notes 1 D, 2 E, 3 F, 4 G, 5 A, 6 B, 7 C, 8 D, 9 E, 10 F, 11 G, 12 A. See also[edit]Krachap piv t eTraditional Cambodian musical instrumentsXylophonesRoneat ek Roneat dek Roneat thung Roneat thongGong chimesKong toch Kong thomDrumsSamphor Skor arak Skor thom Skor chhaiyam Skor yikeFiddlesTro Khmer Tro sau toch Tro sau thom Tro u Tro cheZithers and plucked lutesKhim Krapeu Chapei dong veng Kse dievFlutesKhloy Khloy ek Khloy thomOboes and free reed pipesSralai Kaen Ploy Pey ar Pey pok Sralai toch Sralai thom AngkouchOtherKong mong Saing SlekReferences[edit]^ "South East Asia"
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Khmer Script
Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
32 c. BCE Hieratic
Hieratic
32 c. BCEDemotic 7 c. BCEMeroitic 3 c. BCEProto-Sinaitic 19 c. BCEUgaritic 15 c. BCE Epigraphic South Arabian 9 c. BCEGe’ez 5–6 c. BCEPhoenician 12 c. BCEPaleo-Hebrew 10 c. BCESamaritan 6 c. BCE Libyco-Berber
Libyco-Berber
3 c. BCETifinaghPaleohispanic (semi-syllabic) 7 c. BCE Aramaic 8 c. BCE Kharoṣṭhī
Kharoṣṭhī
4 c. BCE Brāhmī 4 c. BCE Brahmic family
Brahmic family
(see)E.g. Tibetan 7 c. CE Devanagari
Devanagari
13 c. CECanadian syllabics 1840Hebrew 3 c. BCE Pahlavi 3 c. BCEAvestan 4 c. CEPalmyrene 2 c. BCE Syriac 2 c. BCENabataean 2 c. BCEArabic 4 c. CEN'Ko 1949 CESogdian 2 c. BCEOrkhon (old Turkic) 6 c. CEOld Hungarian c. 650 CEOld UyghurMongolian 1204 CEMandaic 2 c. CEGreek 8 c. BCEEtruscan 8 c. BCELatin 7 c
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Strings (music)
A string is the vibrating element that produces sound in string instruments such as the guitar, harp, piano (piano wire), and members of the violin family. Strings are lengths of a flexible material that a musical instrument holds under tension so that they can vibrate freely, but controllably. Strings may be "plain", consisting only of a single material, like steel, nylon, or gut, or wound, having a "core" of one material and an overwinding of another. This is to make the string vibrate at the desired pitch, while maintaining a low profile and sufficient flexibility for playability. The invention of wound strings, such as nylon covered in wound metal, was a crucial step in string instrument technology, because a metal-wound string can produce a lower pitch than a catgut string of similar thickness. This enabled stringed instruments to be made with less thick bass strings
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Gong Chime
A gong chime is a generic term for a set of small, high-pitched bossed pot gongs. The gongs are ordinarily placed in order of pitch, with the boss upward on cords held in a low wooden frame. The frames can be rectangular or circular (the latter are sometimes called "gong circles"), and may have one or two rows of gongs. They are played by one to four musicians, each using two padded sticks to strike them. They are an important instrument in a large number of Southeast Asian musical ensembles, such as Indonesian gamelan, Philippine kulintang, or Thai pi phat
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String Instrument
Plucked Appalachian dulcimer
Appalachian dulcimer
(United States) Autoharp Baglama
Baglama
or Saz (Turkey) Bajo sexto
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Xylophone
The xylophone (from the Greek words ξύλον—xylon, "wood"[1] + φωνή—phōnē, "sound, voice",[2] meaning "wooden sound") is a musical instrument in the percussion family that consists of wooden bars struck by mallets. Each bar is an idiophone tuned to a pitch of a musical scale, whether pentatonic or heptatonic in the case of many African and Asian instruments, diatonic in many western children's instruments, or chromatic for orchestral use. The term xylophone may be used generally, to include all such instruments such as the marimba, balafon and even the semantron. However, in the orchestra, the term xylophone refers specifically to a chromatic instrument of somewhat higher pitch range and drier timbre than the marimba, and these two instruments should not be confused. The term is also popularly used to refer to similar instruments of the lithophone and metallophone types
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Nylon
Nylon
Nylon
is a generic designation for a family of synthetic polymers, based on aliphatic or semi-aromatic polyamides. Nylon
Nylon
is a thermoplastic silky material[1] that can be melt-processed into fibers, films or shapes.[2]:2 Nylon
Nylon
was the first commercially successful synthetic thermoplastic polymer.[3] DuPont
DuPont
began its research project in 1930
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Guitar
The guitar is a fretted musical instrument that usually has six strings.[1] The sound is projected either acoustically, using a hollow wooden or plastic and wood box (for an acoustic guitar), or through electrical amplifier and a speaker (for an electric guitar). It is typically played by strumming or plucking the strings with the fingers, thumb or fingernails of the right hand or with a pick while fretting (or pressing against the frets) the strings with the fingers of the left hand. The guitar is a type of chordophone, traditionally constructed from wood and strung with either gut, nylon or steel strings and distinguished from other chordophones by its construction and tuning
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Cambodia
KRAT/ ICT (UTC+07:00)Date format dd/mm/yyyyDrives on the rightCalling code +855 ISO 3166 code KHInternet TLD .khYou may need rendering support to display the Khmer text in this article correctly. Cambodia
Cambodia
(/kæmˈboʊdiə/ ( listen);[7] Khmer: កម្ពុជា, or Kampuchea IPA: [kɑmpuˈciə], French: Cambodge), officially known as the Kingdom of Cambodia
Cambodia
(Khmer: ព្រះរាជាណាចក្រកម្ពុជា, Preăh Réachéanachâk Kâmpŭchéa, IPA: [ˈprĕəh riəciənaːˈcɑk kɑmpuˈciə], French: Royaume du Cambodge), is a sovereign state located in the southern portion of the Indochina Peninsula in Southeast Asia
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Khmer Language
Khmer /kmɛər/[4] or Cambodian (natively ភាសាខ្មែរ [pʰiːəsaː kʰmaːe], or more formally ខេមរភាសា [kʰeɛmaʔraʔ pʰiːəsaː]) is the language of the Khmer people
Khmer people
and the official language of Cambodia. With approximately 16 million speakers, it is the second most widely spoken Austroasiatic language (after Vietnamese). Khmer has been influenced considerably by Sanskrit and Pali, especially in the royal and religious registers, through Hinduism
Hinduism
and Buddhism
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Phnom Penh
Phnom Penh
Penh
(/pəˈnɔːm ˈpɛn/ or /ˈnɒm ˈpɛn/;[2][3] Khmer: ភ្នំពេញ, Khmer pronunciation: [pʰnum peɲ]), formerly known as Krong Chaktomuk or Krong Chaktomuk Serimongkul (Khmer: ក្រុងចតុមុខសិរិមង្គល),[4] is the capital and most populous city of the Southeast Asian country of Cambodia. Located on the banks of the Tonlé Sap
Tonlé Sap
and Mekong
Mekong
River, Phnom Penh
Penh
has been the national capital since French colonization of Cambodia, and has grown to become the nation's economic, industrial, and cultural center. Once known as the "Pearl of Asia," it was considered one of the loveliest French-built cities in Indochina[5] in the 1920s. Phnom Penh, along with Siem Reap
Siem Reap
and Sihanoukville, are significant global and domestic tourist destinations for Cambodia
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Rebana
The rebana or terbangan is a Malay tambourine that is used in Islamic devotional music in Southeast Asia, particularly in Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei, and Singapore. The sound of the rebana often accompany Islamic ritual such as the zikir. The name rebana came from the Arabic word robbana ("our Lord").Contents1 In Malaysia 2 In Indonesia2.1 Sumatra 2.2 Jakarta3 In Cambodia 4 ReferencesIn Malaysia[edit] The largest type of Malay rebana, the rebana ibi, is widely used by people in east-coast states of Kelantan
Kelantan
and Terengganu.[1][2] This instrument is derived from the Arabic cultural elements. but according to the saga of local stories, musical instruments Kompang entrance on the ground wither exactly selangor brought by the great scholar of the family entourage of the Pondok Tegalsari in Ponorogo, the island of Java, which is the forerunner of Pondok Modern Darussalam Gontor, dato Khasan Besari
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Tro Sau Toch
The tro sau toch is a Cambodian instrument used in Khmer classical music. It is a two-string verticlal fiddle with a hardwood body. The word toch means "small." It is equivalent to the Thai Saw duang.[1] References[edit]^ Peter Fletcher (2001). World Musics in Context. Oxford University Press
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Khene
The khene (/ˈkɛn/; spelled "Can" in English; Lao: ແຄນ; Thai: แคน, RTGS: khaen, pronounced [kʰɛ̄ːn]; Khmer: គែន - Ken; Vietnamese: khèn) is a mouth organ of Lao origin whose pipes, which are usually made of bamboo, are connected with a small, hollowed-out hardwood reservoir into which air is blown. Today associated with the Lao people
Lao people
of Laos
Laos
and Isan, other similar instruments date back to the Bronze Age. In Cambodia, it is used among the ethnic Lao population of the province of Stung Treng
Stung Treng
and is used in lakhon ken, a Cambodian dance drama genre that features the khene as the premiere instrument.[1][2] The most interesting characteristic of the khene is its free reed, which is made of brass or silver
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Sralai
The sralai (Khmer: ស្រឡៃ) is a wind instrument used in the pinpeat of Cambodia. Its quadruple reed is made of palm leaf, and its body has a slightly conical bore. Its cousin, the Western oboe, has a double reed and a conical bore. The pinpeat instruments tune to the sralai's pitch, and the player must learn circular breathing to play continuously without stopping for breath. The sralai is very similar in construction and playing technique to the Thai pi. External links[edit] Sralai "oboe" page from Cambodian with Dr
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