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Chancel
In church architecture, the chancel is the space around the altar, including the choir and the sanctuary (sometimes called the presbytery), at the liturgical east end of a traditional Christian church building.[1] It may terminate in an apse. It is generally the area used by the clergy and choir during worship, while the congregation is in the nave. Direct access may be provided by a priest's door, usually on the south side of the church.[2] This is one definition, sometimes called the "strict" one; in practice in churches where the eastern end contains other elements such as an ambulatory and side chapels, these are also often counted as part of the chancel, especially when discussing architecture.[3] In smaller churches, where the altar is backed by the outside east wall and there is no distinct choir, the chancel and sanctuary may be the same area
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Latin Cross
This is a list of Christian cross
Christian cross
variants. The Christian cross, with or without a figure of Christ included, is the main religious symbol of Christianity. A cross with figure of Christ affixed to it is termed a crucifix and the figure is often referred to as the corpus (Latin for "body"). The term Greek cross
Greek cross
designates a cross with arms of equal length, as in a plus sign, while the term Latin
Latin
cross designates a cross with an elongated descending arm. Numerous other variants have been developed during the medieval period. Christian crosses are used widely in churches, on top of church buildings, on bibles, in heraldry, in personal jewelry, on hilltops, and elsewhere as an attestation or other symbol of Christianity. Crosses are a prominent feature of Christian cemeteries, either carved on gravestones or as sculpted stelae
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Protestant Reformation
The Reformation, or, more fully, the Protestant
Protestant
Reformation, was a schism in Western Christianity
Christianity
initiated by Martin Luther
Martin Luther
and continued by John Calvin, Huldrych Zwingli, Jacobus Arminius
Jacobus Arminius
and other Protestant Reformers
Protestant Reformers
in 16th-century Europe. It is usually considered to have started with the publication of the Ninety-five Theses
Ninety-five Theses
by Martin Luther
Martin Luther
in 1517 and lasted until the end of the Thirty Years' War in 1648. Although there had been earlier attempts to reform the Catholic Church – such as those of Jan Hus, Peter Waldo, John Wycliffe, and Girolamo Savonarola – Luther is widely acknowledged to have started the Reformation
Reformation
with the Ninety-five Theses
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Ciborium (architecture)
In ecclesiastical architecture, a ciborium ("ciborion": κιβώριον in Greek) is a canopy or covering supported by columns, freestanding in the sanctuary, that stands over and covers the altar in a basilica or other church. It may also be known by the more general term of baldachin, though ciborium is often considered more correct for examples in churches.[2] Early ciboria had curtains hanging from rods between the columns, so that the altar could be concealed from the congregation at points in the liturgy. Smaller examples may cover other objects in a church. In a very large church, a ciborium is an effective way of visually highlighting the altar, and emphasizing its importance. The altar and ciborium are often set upon a dais to raise it above the floor of the sanctuary. A ciborium is also a covered, chalice-shaped container for Eucharistic hosts
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Choir School
This article contains a list of choir schools sorted alphabetically by countries.Contents1 Australia 2 Austria 3 Canada 4 Czech Republic 5 Denmark 6 France 7 Germany 8 Ireland 9 Latvia 10 The Netherlands 11 New Zealand 12 South Africa 13 Suriname 14 Switzerland 15 United Kingdom 16 United States 17 See also 18 External linksAustralia[edit]St Andrew’s Cathedral School, Sydney St Mary's Cathedral College, Sydney Xavier High School, Albury, NSW St John's Cathedral Choir School, BrisbaneAustria[edit]Vienna Boys' ChoirCanada[edit]Royal St. George's College St. Michael's Choir School Petits chanteurs du mont-royal St
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Transubstantiation
Transubstantiation
Transubstantiation
(Latin: transsubstantiatio; Greek: μετουσίωσις metousiosis) is, according to the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church, the change of substance or essence by which the bread and wine offered in the sacrifice of the sacrament of the Eucharist
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Lateran Council
The Lateran councils were ecclesiastical councils or synods of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
held at Rome
Rome
in the Lateran Palace
Lateran Palace
next to the Lateran Basilica
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Eucharist
The Eucharist
Eucharist
(/ˈjuːkərɪst/; also called Holy Communion or the Lord's Supper, among other names) is a Christian
Christian
rite that is considered a sacrament in most churches and an ordinance in others. According to the New Testament, the rite was instituted by Jesus Christ
Christ
during his Last Supper; giving his disciples bread and wine during the Passover
Passover
meal, Jesus
Jesus
commanded his followers to "do this in memory of me" while referring to the bread as "my body" and the wine as "my blood".[1][2] Through the Eucharistic celebration Christians remember both Christ's sacrifice of himself on the cross and his commission of the apostles at the Last Supper.[3] The elements of the Eucharist, bread (leavened or unleavened) and wine (or grape juice), are consecrated on an altar (or table) and consumed thereafter
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Canon Law
Canon law
Canon law
(from Greek kanon, a 'straight measuring rod, ruler') is a set of ordinances and regulations made by ecclesiastical authority (Church leadership), for the government of a Christian organization or church and its members. It is the internal ecclesiastical law, or operational policy, governing the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
(both the Latin Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches), the Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox churches, and the individual national churches within the Anglican Communion.[1] The way that such church law is legislated, interpreted and at times adjudicated varies widely among these three bodies of churches
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Parish
A parish is a church territorial entity constituting a division within a diocese. A parish is under the pastoral care and clerical jurisdiction of a parish priest, who might be assisted by one or more curates, and who operates from a parish church. Historically, a parish often covered the same geographical area as a manor. Its association with the parish church remains paramount.[1] By extension the term parish refers not only to the territorial entity but to the people of its community or congregation as well as to church property within it
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Counter-Reformation
The Counter- Reformation
Reformation
(Latin: Contrareformatio), also called the Catholic Reformation
Reformation
(Latin: Reformatio Catholica) or the Catholic Revival,[1] was the period of Catholic resurgence initiated in response to the Protestant Reformation, beginning with the Council of Trent (1545–1563) and ending at the close of the Thirty Years' War (1648)
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Early Christian Architecture
Early Christian
Christian
art and architecture or Paleochristian art is the art produced by Christians or under Christian
Christian
patronage from the earliest period of Christianity
Christianity
to, depending on the definition used, sometime between 260 and 525. In practice, identifiably Christian
Christian
art only survives from the 2nd century onwards.[1] After 550 at the latest, Christian
Christian
art is classified as Byzantine, or of some other regional type.[2] It is hard to know when distinctly Christian
Christian
art began. Prior to 100, Christians may have been constrained by their position as a persecuted group from producing durable works of art
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Anglo-Catholic
The terms Anglo-Catholicism, Anglican Catholicism, and Catholic Anglicanism
Anglicanism
refer to people, beliefs and practices within Anglicanism that emphasise the Catholic
Catholic

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Church Of England
The Church of England
England
(C of E) is the state church of England.[3][4][5] The Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
(currently Justin Welby) is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England
England
is also the mother church of the international Anglican
Anglican
Communion
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High Church
The term "high church" refers to beliefs and practices of ecclesiology, liturgy, and theology, generally with an emphasis on formality and resistance to "modernisation." Although used in connection with various Christian traditions, the term originated in and has been principally associated with the Anglican/Episcopal tradition, where it describes Anglican
Anglican
churches using a number of ritual practices associated in the popular mind with Roman Catholicism. The opposite is low church. Contemporary media discussing Anglican
Anglican
churches tend to prefer evangelical to "low church", and Anglo-Catholic
Anglo-Catholic
to "high church", though the terms do not exactly correspond
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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