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Chahars
The Chahars
Chahars
(Khalkha Mongolian: Цахар, Tsahar) are a subgroup of Mongols
Mongols
that speak Chakhar Mongolian
Chakhar Mongolian
and predominantly live in southeastern Inner Mongolia, China. The Chahars
Chahars
were originally one of estates of Kublai Khan
Kublai Khan
located around Jingzhao (now Xi'an). They moved from Shaanxi
Shaanxi
to southeastern region controlled by the Northern Yuan dynasty
Northern Yuan dynasty
based in Mongolia
Mongolia
in the 15th century
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China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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Torghut
The Torghut
Torghut
(Mongolian: Торгууд/Torguud, "Guardsman" or "the Silks") are one of the four major subgroups of the Four Oirats. The Torghut
Torghut
nobles traced its descent to the Keraite ruler Tooril also many Torghuts descended from the Keraites.Contents1 History 2 Language 3 Modern notable Torghuts in Mongolia 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] They might have been kheshigs of the Great Khans before Kublai Khan. The Torghut
Torghut
clan first appeared as an Oirat group in the mid-16th century. After the collapse of the Four Oirat Alliance, the majority of the Torghuts under Kho Orluk separated from other Oirat groups and moved west to the Volga
Volga
region in 1630, forming the core of the Kalmyks
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Shenyang
Shenyang
Shenyang
([ʂə̀n.jǎŋ]; Chinese: 沈阳), formerly known by its Manchu
Manchu
name Mukden or Fengtian (Chinese: 奉天; pinyin: Fèngtiān), is the provincial capital and the largest city of
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Banners Of Inner Mongolia
A banner (Chinese: 旗; pinyin: qí) is an administrative division of the Inner Mongolia
Inner Mongolia
Autonomous Region
Autonomous Region
in the People's Republic of China, corresponding to the county level. Banners were first used during the Qing Dynasty, which organized the Mongols into banners except those who belonged to the Eight Banners. Each banner had sumu as nominal subdivisions. In Inner Mongolia, several banners made up a league. In the rest, including Outer Mongolia, northern Xinjiang
Xinjiang
and Qinghai, Aimag (Аймаг) was the largest administrative division. While it restricted the Mongols from crossing banner borders, the dynasty protected Mongolia from population pressure from China proper. There were 49 banners and 24 tribes during the Republic of China.[1] Today, banners are a county level division in the Chinese administrative hierarchy
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Zhangjiakou
Zhangjiakou
Zhangjiakou
(/ˈdʒɑːŋˈdʒjɑːˈkoʊ/;[1] Chinese: 张家口; pinyin: Zhāngjiākǒu; Mandarin pronunciation: [ʈʂáŋ tɕjá kʰòu]) also known by several other names, is a prefecture-level city in northwestern Hebei
Hebei
province in Northern China, bordering Beijing
Beijing
to the southeast, Inner Mongolia
Inner Mongolia
to the north and west, and Shanxi
Shanxi
to the southwest. At the 2010 census, its population was 4,345,485 inhabitants on 36,861.56 square kilometres (14,232.33 sq mi), divided into 17 Counties and Districts. The built-up (or metro) area made of Qiaoxi, Qiaodong Districts and Wanquan County largely being conurbated had 838,978 inhabitants in 2010 on 1412.7 km2
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Hohhot
Hohhot
Hohhot
(Mongolian: Mongolian script: Kökeqota, Mongolian Cyrillic: Хөх хот Höh hot /xɵxˈxɔtʰ/; Chinese: 呼和浩特; pinyin: Hūhéhàotè), abbreviated Hushi (Chinese: 呼市; pinyin: Hūshì), formerly known as Kweisui (traditional Chinese: 歸綏; simplified Chinese: 归绥; pinyin: PRC Standard Mandarin: Guīsuí, ROC Standard Mandarin: Guīsuī), is the capital of Inner Mongolia
Inner Mongolia
in North China,[3][4] serving as the region's administrative, economic and cultural center.[5] Its population was 2,866,615 inhabitants at the 2010 census, of whom 1,980,774 lived in the built-up (or metro) area made up of 4 urban districts.[6] The name of the city in Mongolian means "Blue City", although it is also wrongly referred to as the "Green City."[7] The color blue in Mongol
Mongol
culture is associated with the sky, eternity and purity
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Dolon Nor
Dolon may refer to:Dolon (mythology), character in Greek mythology who fought for Troy during the Trojan War Dolon (air base), air base in Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan Dolon, Issyk Kul, village in the Issyk Kul Province of Kyrgyzstan Dolon Pass, mountain pass in Kyrgyzstan Dolon Nor, town in Duolun County, Inner Mongolia, China Duolun County, or Dolon, in Inner Mongolia, China 7815 Dolon, Jupiter TrojanThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Dolon. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Ili River
The Ili River
River
(Uyghur: ئىلى دەرياسى‎, ULY: Ili deryasi, official: Или дәряси, UYY: Ili dəryasi?; Kazakh: Ile, ئله; Russian: Или; Chinese: 伊犁河; pinyin: Yīlí Hé; Dungan: Йили хә, Xiao'erjing: اِلِ حْ; Mongolian: Ил, literally "Bareness") is a river situated in northwestern China
China
and southeastern Kazakhstan. It flows from the Ili Kazakh Autonomous Prefecture of the Xinjiang
Xinjiang
Uighur Autonomous Region to the Almaty Province in Kazakhstan. It is 1,439 kilometres (894 mi) long, 815 kilometres (506 mi) of which is in Kazakhstan. The river originates from the Tekes and Kunges (or Künes) rivers in Eastern Tian Shan. The Ili River
River
drains the basin between the Tian Shan
Tian Shan
and the Borohoro Mountains
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Dzungar Khanate
The Dzungar Khanate, also written as the Zunghar Khanate, was an Oirat khanate on the Eurasian Steppe. It covered the area called Dzungaria and stretched from the west end of the Great Wall of China
China
to present-day Kazakhstan, and from present-day Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
to southern Siberia. Most of this area today is part of the Xinjiang
Xinjiang
autonomous region in China, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan. The Dzungar Khanate
Dzungar Khanate
was the last major nomadic empire left from the Mongol
Mongol
Empire. In 1678, Galdan
Galdan
received from the Dalai Lama
Dalai Lama
the title of Boshogtu Khan, thus confirming the Dzungars
Dzungars
as the leading tribe within the Oirats
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Dzungar People
The name Dzungar people, also written as Zunghar (literally züüngar, from the Mongolian for "left hand"), referred to the several Oirat tribes who formed and maintained the Dzungar Khanate
Dzungar Khanate
in the 17th and 18th centuries. Historically they were one of major tribes of the Four Oirat confederation. They were also known as the Eleuths or Ööled, from the Qing dynasty
Qing dynasty
euphemism for the hated word "Dzungar",[1] and also called "Kalmyks"
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Outer Mongolia
Outer Mongolia
Mongolia
(Mongolian script: ᠭᠠᠳᠠᠭᠠᠳᠤ ᠮᠣᠩᠭ᠋ᠣᠯ or ᠠᠷᠤ ᠮᠣᠩᠭ᠋ᠣᠯ , Mongolian Cyrillic: Гадаад Монгол or Ар Монгол, romanization: Gadaad Mongol or Alr Mongol; Chinese: 外蒙古; pinyin: Wài Měnggǔ)[1] was a territory of the Manchu-led Qing dynasty
Qing dynasty
(1644–1912). Its area was roughly equivalent to that of the modern state of Mongolia, which is sometimes called "North Mongolia" in China
China
today, plus the Russian republic of Tuva
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Chinese Language
Legend:   Countries identified Chinese as a primary, administrative, or native language   Countries with more than 5,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 1,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 500,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 100,000 Chinese speakers   Major Chinese-speaking settlementsThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Xinjiang
Xinjiang
Xinjiang
Uygur Autonomous Region[6] (Uyghur: شىنجاڭ ئۇيغۇر ئاپتونوم رايونى‎; SASM/GNC: Xinjang Uyĝur Aptonom Rayoni; Chinese: 新疆维吾尔自治区; pinyin: Xīnjiāng Wéiwú’ěr Zìzhìqū) is a provincial-level autonomous region of China
China
in the northwest of the country. It is the largest Chinese administrative division and the eighth largest country subdivision in the world, spanning over 1.6 million km2 (640,000 square miles).[1] Xinjiang
Xinjiang
contains the disputed territory of Aksai Chin, which is administered by China. Xinjiang
Xinjiang
borders the countries of Mongolia, Russia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan
Pakistan
and India
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Kyakhta
Kyakhta
Kyakhta
(Russian: Кя́хта, [ˈkʲæxtə]; Russian Buryat: Хяагта, Xyágta, [ˈxjaːktɑ]) is a town and the administrative center of Kyakhtinsky District
Kyakhtinsky District
in the Republic of Buryatia, Russia, located on the Kyakhta
Kyakhta
River near the Mongolia– Russia
Russia
border
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Mongolian Revolution Of 1921
In political science, a revolution (Latin: revolutio, "a turn around") is a fundamental change in political power and political organization, which occurs relatively quickly when the population revolt against their oppression (political, social, economic) by the incumbent government.[1] In book V of the Politics, the Ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle
Aristotle
(384–322 BC) described two types of political revolution:Complete change from one constitution to another Modification of an existing constitution.[2]Revolutions have occurred through human history and vary widely in terms of methods, duration, and motivating ideology. Their results include major changes in culture, economy, and socio-political institutions, usually in response to overwhelming autocracy or plutocracy. Scholarly debates about what does and does not constitute a revolution center on several issues
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