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Chūzan Seikan
Chūzan
Chūzan
Seikan (中山世鑑) or Mirror of Chūzan, compiled in 1650 by Shō Shōken, is the first official history of the Ryūkyū Kingdom. In six scrolls, the main text occupies five and an accompanying summary the sixth
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Chūzan
Chūzan
Chūzan
(中山) was one of three kingdoms which controlled Okinawa
Okinawa
in the 14th century
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Satsuma Domain
Satsuma Domain
Satsuma Domain
(薩摩藩, Satsuma-han), also known as Kagoshima Domain, was a Japanese domain of the Edo
Edo
period. It is associated with the provinces of Satsuma, Ōsumi and Hyūga in modern-day Kagoshima Prefecture and Miyazaki Prefecture
Miyazaki Prefecture
on the island of Kyūshū. In the han system, Satsuma was a political and economic abstraction based on periodic cadastral surveys and projected agricultural yields.[1] In other words, the domain was defined in terms of kokudaka, not land area.[2] This was different from the feudalism of the West. The domain was ruled from Kagoshima
Kagoshima
Castle in Kagoshima
Kagoshima
city
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Okinawa Prefecture
Okinawa Prefecture
Okinawa Prefecture
(Japanese: 沖縄県, Hepburn: Okinawa-ken, Okinawan: ウチナーチン Uchinaa-chin) is the southernmost prefecture of Japan.[1] It encompasses two thirds of the Ryukyu Islands in a chain over 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) long. The Ryukyu Islands
Ryukyu Islands
extend southwest from Kyushu
Kyushu
(the southwesternmost of Japan's four main islands) to Taiwan. Naha, Okinawa's capital, is located in the southern part of Okinawa Island.[2] Although Okinawa Prefecture
Okinawa Prefecture
comprises just 0.6 percent of Japan's total land mass, about 75 percent of all United States military personnel stationed in Japan
Japan
are assigned to installations in the prefecture.[3] Currently about 26,000 U.S
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Ryūkyū Domain
The Ryukyu Domain
Ryukyu Domain
(琉球藩, Ryūkyū han) was a short-lived domain of Japan, lasting from 1872 to 1879, before becoming the current Okinawa Prefecture
Okinawa Prefecture
and other islands[citation needed] at the Pacific edge of the East China Sea. When the domain was created in 1872, Japan's feudal han system had developed in unique ways
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Meiji Period
The Meiji period
Meiji period
(明治時代, Meiji-jidai), also known as the Meiji era, is a Japanese era which extended from October 23, 1868, to July 30, 1912.[1] This period represents the first half of the Empire of Japan
Japan
during which Japanese society moved from being an isolated feudal society to its modern form. Fundamental changes affected its social structure, internal politics, economy, military, and foreign relations. The period corresponded to the reign of Emperor Meiji
Emperor Meiji
after 1868, and lasted until his death in 1912
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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Eikyō
Eikyō (永享) was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō, "year" name) after Shōchō and before Kakitsu. This period spanned the years from September 1429 through February 1441.[1] The reigning emperor was Go-Hanazono-tennō (後花園天皇).[2]Contents1 Change of era 2 Events of the Eikyō era 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksChange of era[edit]1429 Eikyō gannen (永享元年): The era name was changed to mark the beginning of the reign of Emperor Go-Hanazono
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Shimazu Clan
The Shimazu clan
Shimazu clan
(島津氏, Shimazu-shi) were the daimyō of the Satsuma han, which spread over Satsuma, Ōsumi and Hyūga provinces in Japan. The Shimazu were identified as one of the tozama or outsider daimyō families[1] in contrast with the fudai or insider clans which were hereditary vassals or allies of the Tokugawa clan.Contents1 History 2 Simplified family tree 3 Order of Succession 4 Other Members 5 Important Retainers 6 Popular culture 7 See also 8 Notes 9 ReferencesHistory[edit]Grave of Shimazu family at Mount Koya.The Shimazu were descendants of the Seiwa Genji
Seiwa Genji
branch of the Minamoto
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University Of Hawai'i Press
The University of Hawaiʻi Press is a university press that is part of the University of Hawaiʻi. The University of Hawaiʻi Press was founded in 1947, with the mission of advancing and disseminating scholarship by publishing current research in all disciplines of the humanities and natural and social sciences in the regions of Asia
Asia
and the Pacific. In addition to scholarly monographs, the Press publishes educational materials and reference works such as dictionaries, language texts, classroom readers, atlases, and encyclopedias. During the 2006–2007 fiscal year, the Press published 94 projects: 80 books and monographs and 14 scholarly journals. At 30 June 2007, the Press had published 2,323 books and other media, 1,289 of which are currently in print
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Gregory Smits
Gregory James Smits (born 1960) is an American historian, academic, writer and Japanologist. He is a professor of Japanese history at Pennsylvania State University.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Select works 3 References 4 External linksEarly life[edit] Smits was born in Columbia, Missouri. He earned a BA from the University of Florida
University of Florida
in 1983. He was awarded a master's degree from the University of Hawaii
University of Hawaii
at Manoa. The University of Southern California granted his Ph.D.[1] Select works[edit] Smit's published writings encompass 8 works in 18 publications in 2 languages and 1,101 library holdings.[2] This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness
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Shō Nei
Shō Nei
Shō Nei
(尚寧, 1564–1620) was king of the Ryukyu Kingdom (modern-day Okinawa Prefecture, Japan) from 1587–1620. He reigned during the 1609 invasion of Ryukyu and was the first king of Ryukyu to be a vassal to the Shimazu clan
Shimazu clan
of Satsuma, a Japanese feudal domain. Shō Nei
Shō Nei
was the great-grandson of Shō Shin
Shō Shin
(尚真, r. 1477–1526) and the adopted son-in-law of Shō Ei (尚永, r. 1573–1586).Contents1 Biography 2 The Oaths Sworn 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesBiography[edit] Early in Shō Nei's reign, Japanese warlord Toyotomi Hideyoshi
Toyotomi Hideyoshi
planned an invasion of Korea. Through messengers from Satsuma, he ordered that the kingdom contribute warriors to the invasion efforts, and was refused; he also commanded that Ryukyu temporarily suspend its official missions to China
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Japanese Language
Japanese (日本語, Nihongo, [ɲihoŋɡo] or [ɲihoŋŋo] ( listen)) is an East Asian language spoken by about 126 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic (or Japanese-Ryukyuan) language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance. Little is known of the language's prehistory, or when it first appeared in Japan. Chinese documents from the 3rd century recorded a few Japanese words, but substantial texts did not appear until the 8th century. During the Heian period
Heian period
(794–1185), Chinese had considerable influence on the vocabulary and phonology of Old Japanese
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Kanbun
Kanbun
Kanbun
(漢文, "Chinese writing"), a method of annotating Classical Chinese so that it can be read in Japanese, was used from the Heian period to the mid-20th century. Much Japanese literature
Japanese literature
was written in this style, and it was the general writing style for official and intellectual works throughout the period. As a result, Sino-Japanese vocabulary makes up a large portion of the Japanese lexicon, and much classical Chinese literature
Chinese literature
is accessible to Japanese readers in some semblance of the original
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Kyūyō
Kyūyō (球陽) is an official history of the Ryūkyū Kingdom compiled between 1743 and 1745 by a group of scholar-officials led by Tei Heitetsu (鄭秉哲). Written in kanbun, and numbering twenty-two scrolls, a supplementary volume in three scrolls documents relations with Satsuma, while a separate volume known as Irō setsuden (遺老説伝) is a compendium of one hundred and forty-two legends and folktales formerly transmitted orally. Later records continued to be added to the chronicle until 1876. The name, like Kiyō (崎陽) for Nagasaki and Satsuyō (薩陽) for Satsuma, is likely a poetic invocation of "Ryūkyū".[1][2] See also[edit] Wikisource
Wikisource
has original text related to this article: 球陽記事List of Cultural Properties of Japan - writings (Okinawa)References[edit]^ Hendrickx, Katrien (2007). The Origins of Banana-fibre Cloth in the Ryukyus, Japan. Leuven University Press
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