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Cesar Geronimo
César Francisco Gerónimo Zorrilla (born March 11, 1948), known as César Gerónimo, is a former outfielder in Major League Baseball, who was starting centerfielder on the famed Big Red Machine of the Cincinnati Reds
Cincinnati Reds
during the 1970s. He batted and threw left-handed.Contents1 Early life 2 Professional career 3 Personal life 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Gerónimo was born in El Seibo, Dominican Republic. His father was a driver for a car service, shuttling passengers on the three-hour drive from El Seibo to the capital of the Dominican Republic, Santo Domingo.[1] At age 14, César's parents sent him to school at a seminary with hopes that he would become a priest. However, his athletic prowess continued to develop, especially in basketball. He didn't start playing baseball until he was 17
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Center Fielder
A center fielder, abbreviated CF, is the outfielder in baseball who plays defense in center field – the baseball fielding position between left field and right field. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the center fielder is assigned the number 8. Position description[edit] Outfielders must cover large distances, so speed, instincts and quickness to react to the ball are key. They must be able to catch fly balls above their heads and on the run. They must be able to throw the ball accurately over a long distance to be effective. Novice players may find it difficult to concentrate on the game, since they are so far from the action. Emphasizing the correct position will give outfield players something to concentrate on at each pitch. As well as the requirements above, the center fielder must be the outfielder who has the best combination of speed and throwing distance
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Cincinnati Reds Hall Of Fame
The Cincinnati Reds
Cincinnati Reds
Hall of Fame and Museum is an entity established by Major League Baseball's Cincinnati Reds
Cincinnati Reds
franchise that pays homage to the team's past through displays, photographs and multimedia. It was instituted in 1958 to recognize the career of former Cincinnati Reds players, managers and front-office executives. It is located at the Great American Ball Park. The Reds first teamed up with the Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Chapter of Commerce in 1958 to promote the inductions, which were voted on by Reds fans. Nevertheless, no induction took place in 1985, and starting in 1989, the discontinuation of the ceremonies lasted for nine years. In 1998, Reds executive John Allen revived the inductions and turned over voting to the local chapter of the Baseball Writers Association of America, which also votes annually for the team's Most Valuable Player and pitcher
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Carl Yastrzemski
Carl Michael Yastrzemski (/jəˈstrɛmski/; nicknamed "Yaz";[1] born August 22, 1939) is an American former Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
player. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame
Baseball Hall of Fame
in 1989.[2] Yastrzemski played his entire 23-year baseball career with the Boston Red Sox (1961–1983). He was primarily a left fielder, but also played 33 games as a third baseman[3] and mostly was a first baseman and designated hitter later in his career.[4] Yastrzemski is an 18-time All-Star, the possessor of seven Gold Gloves, a member of the 3,000 hit club, and the first American League
American League
player in that club to also accumulate over 400 home runs.[5] He is second on the all-time list for games played, and third for total at-bats
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Run (baseball Statistics)
In baseball, a run is scored when a player advances around first, second and third base and returns safely to home plate, touching the bases in that order, before three outs are recorded and all obligations to reach base safely on batted balls are met or assured. A player may score by hitting a home run or by any combination of plays that puts him safely "on base" (that is, on first, second, or third) as a runner and subsequently brings him home. The object of the game is for a team to score more runs than its opponent. The Official Baseball
Baseball
Rules hold that if the third out of an inning is a force out of a runner advancing to any base then, even if another baserunner crosses home plate before that force out is made, his run does not count. However, if the third out is not a force out, but a tag out, then if that other baserunner crosses home plate before that tag out is made, his run will count
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Hit (baseball Statistics)
In baseball statistics, a hit (denoted by H), also called a base hit, is credited to a batter when the batter safely reaches first base after hitting the ball into fair territory, without the benefit of an error or a fielder's choice.Contents1 Scoring a hit1.1 Types of hits2 Pitching a no-hitter 3 History 4 Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
rules 5 See also 6 ReferencesScoring a hit[edit] To achieve a hit, the batter must reach first base before any fielder can either tag him with the ball, throw to another player protecting the base before the batter reaches it, or tag first base while carrying the ball
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Double (baseball)
In baseball, a double is the act of a batter striking the pitched ball and safely reaching second base without being called out by the umpire, without the benefit of a fielder's misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielder's choice.Contents1 Description 2 Doubles leaders, Major League Baseball2.1 Career 2.2 Season3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] Typically, a double is a well-hit ball into the outfield that either finds the "gap" between the center fielder and one of the corner outfielders, bounces off the outfield wall and down into the field of play, or is hit up one of the two foul lines. To hit many doubles, one must have decent hitting skill and power; it also helps to run well enough to beat an outfield throw. Doubles typically drive in runs from third base, second base, and even from first base at times. When total bases and slugging percentages are calculated, the number two is used for the calculation
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Triple (baseball)
In baseball, a triple is the act of a batter safely reaching third base after hitting the ball, with neither the benefit of a fielder's misplay (see error) nor another runner being put out on a fielder's choice. Triples have become somewhat rare in Major League Baseball. It often requires a ball hit to a distant part of the field, or the ball taking an unusual bounce in the outfield. It also usually means that the batter hit the ball solidly, and be a speedy runner. It also often requires that the batter's team have a good strategic reason for wanting the batter on third base, as a double will already put the batter in scoring position and there will often be little strategic advantage to taking the risk of trying to stretch a double into a triple
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Stolen Base
In baseball, a stolen base occurs when a runner advances to a base to which he is not entitled and the official scorer rules that the advance should be credited to the action of the runner
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Fielding Percentage
In baseball statistics, fielding percentage, also known as fielding average, is a measure that reflects the percentage of times a defensive player properly handles a batted or thrown ball
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Strikeout
In baseball or softball, a strikeout (or strike-out) occurs when a batter racks up three strikes during a time at bat. It usually means the batter is out. A strikeout is a statistic recorded for both pitchers and batters, and is denoted by K.[1] Although a strikeout suggests that the pitcher dominated the batter, the free-swinging style that generates home runs also leaves batters susceptible to striking out. Some of the greatest home run hitters of all time — such as Alex Rodriguez, Reggie Jackson, and Sammy Sosa — were notorious for striking out.Contents1 Rules 2 History 3 Jargon and slang 4 More than three strikeouts in an inning 5 Strikeout
Strikeout
records5.1 Pitchers 5.2 Batters 5.3 Games6 See also 7 References 8 External linksRules[edit] A pitched ball is ruled a ball by the umpire if the batter did not swing at it and, in that umpire's judgement, it does not pass through the strike zone
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Bob Gibson
Robert Gibson (born November 9, 1935) is a retired American baseball pitcher who played 17 seasons in Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) for the St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
(1959–75). Nicknamed "Gibby" and "Hoot", Gibson tallied 251 wins, 3,117 strikeouts, and a 2.91 earned run average (ERA) during his career. A nine-time All-Star and two-time World Series champion, he won two Cy Young
Cy Young
Awards and the 1968 National League (NL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award. In 1981, he was elected to the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility. The Cardinals retired his uniform number 45 in September 1975 and inducted him into the team Hall of Fame in 2014. Born in Omaha, Nebraska, Gibson overcame childhood illness to excel in youth sports, particularly basketball and baseball
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Nolan Ryan
MLB records5,714 career strikeouts 7 career no-hittersMember of the National Baseball Hall of Fame
Baseball Hall of Fame
Induction 1999Vote 98.8% (first ballot)Lynn Nolan Ryan
Nolan Ryan
Jr. (born January 31, 1947), nicknamed The Ryan Express, is a former Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
(MLB) pitcher and a previous chief executive officer (CEO) of the Texas
Texas
Rangers. He is currently an executive adviser to the owner of the Houston Astros. Ryan enjoyed a major league record 27-year baseball career that spanned four decades: 1966, 1968–1993. He pitched for four different teams: the New York Mets, California Angels, Houston Astros, and Texas Rangers
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List Of Players From Dominican Republic In Major League Baseball
This is an alphabetical list of notable baseball players from the Dominican Republic who have played in Major League Baseball since 1950.Contents: Top A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y ZA[edit]Fernando Abad Juan Abreu Tony Abreu José Acevedo Cristhian Adames Miguel Andújar Gibson Alba Hanser Alberto Al Alburquerque Santo Alcalá Arismendy Alcántara Izzy Alcántara Raúl Alcántara Sandy Alcántara Victor Alcántara Manny Alexander Antonio Alfonseca Carlos Almanzar Abraham Almonte Edwin Almonte Erick Almonte Héctor Almonte Zoilo Almonte Felipe Alou Jesús Alou Matty Alou Moisés Alou Darío Álvarez Pedro Álvarez Joaquín Andújar Luis Andújar Greg Aquino Jayson Aquino Alberto Árias Joaquín Arias Jonathan Aro José Arredondo Jairo Asencio Miguel Asencio Ezequiel Astacio Pedro Astacio Erick Aybar Manny Aybar Willy AybarB[edit]Benito Báez José Báez Pedro Báez Lorenzo Barceló Antonio Bastardo Miguel Batista Rafael
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Wayne Granger
Wayne Allan Granger (born March 15, 1944) is a former Major League Baseball right-handed relief pitcher who played for the St. Louis Cardinals (1968, 1973), Cincinnati Reds (1969–1971), Minnesota Twins (1972), New York Yankees (1973), Chicago White Sox (1974), Houston Astros (1975) and Montreal Expos (1976). The 6–4, 165-pound Granger was one of baseball's most effective and durable relief pitchers during the early years of Cincinnati's famed Big Red Machine.[1] Granger graduated from Huntington High School in Huntington, Massachusetts. He attended Springfield College (Massachusetts) where he was a pitcher on the 1965 baseball team.[2] Before his professional career began, Granger played two seasons in the province of Quebec in the Saguenay senior league—in 1963 for the Jonquiere Braves and in 1964 for Port-Alfred in 1964.[3] Granger was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals as an amateur free agent in 1965
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CNN SI
CNN Sports Illustrated (CNNSI) was a 24-hour sports news channel. It was created by Time Warner, bringing together its CNN and Sports Illustrated brands and related resources. It was launched on December 12, 1996.[1] CNN/SI aimed to provide the most comprehensive sports news service on television, bringing in-depth sports news from around the world, and integrating the Internet and television.[2] What led to CNN/SI's demise was that it had the misfortune of being created at about the same time as all-sports news rivals ESPNews and Fox Sports Net's National Sports Report. Though CNN/SI could boast of exclusives such as the tape of Indiana University player Neil Reed, appearing to be choked by former coach Bob Knight, the channel reached about only 20 million homes, not enough to receive a rating by Nielsen Media Research, which was a killer with sponsors
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