HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Cerebellar
The cerebellum ( Latin
Latin
for "little brain") is a major feature of the hindbrain of all vertebrates. Although usually smaller than the cerebrum, in some animals such as the mormyrid fishes it may be as large as or even larger.[1] In humans, the cerebellum plays an important role in motor control, and it may also be involved in some cognitive functions such as attention and language as well as in regulating fear and pleasure responses,[2] but its movement-related functions are the most solidly established
[...More...]

"Cerebellar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cerebrum
The cerebrum is a large part of the brain containing the cerebral cortex (of the two cerebral hemispheres), as well as several subcortical structures, including the hippocampus, basal ganglia, and olfactory bulb. In the human brain, the cerebrum is the uppermost region of the central nervous system. The prosencephalon is the embryonic structure from which the cerebrum develops prenatally. In mammals, the dorsal telencephalon, or pallium, develops into the cerebral cortex, and the ventral telencephalon, or subpallium, becomes the basal ganglia
[...More...]

"Cerebrum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Motor Learning
Motor learning is a change, resulting from practice or a novel experience, in the capability for responding. It often involves improving the smoothness and accuracy of movements and is obviously necessary for complicated movements such as speaking, playing the piano, and climbing trees; but it is also important for calibrating simple movements like reflexes, as parameters of the body and environment change over time. Motor learning research often considers variables that contribute to motor program formation (i.e., underlying skilled motor behaviour), sensitivity of error-detection processes,[1][2] and strength of movement schemas (see motor program). Motor learning is "relatively permanent", as the capability to respond appropriately is acquired and retained
[...More...]

"Motor Learning" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Language
Language
Language
is a system that consists of the development, acquisition, maintenance and use of complex systems of communication, particularly the human ability to do so; and a language is any specific example of such a system. The scientific study of language is called linguistics. Questions concerning the philosophy of language, such as whether words can represent experience, have been debated at least since Gorgias
Gorgias
and Plato
Plato
in ancient Greece. Thinkers such as Rousseau
Rousseau
have argued that language originated from emotions while others like Kant have held that it originated from rational and logical thought. 20th-century philosophers such as Wittgenstein argued that philosophy is really the study of language. Major figures in linguistics include Ferdinand de Saussure and Noam Chomsky. Estimates of the number of human languages in the world vary between 5,000 and 7,000
[...More...]

"Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Motor Coordination
Motor coordination is the combination of body movements created with the kinematic (such as spatial direction) and kinetic (force) parameters that result in intended actions. Motor coordination is achieved when subsequent parts of the same movement, or the movements of several limbs or body parts are combined in a manner that is well timed, smooth, and efficient with respect to the intended goal. This involves the integration of proprioceptive information detailing the position and movement of the musculoskeletal system with the neural processes in the brain and spinal cord which control, plan, and relay motor commands
[...More...]

"Motor Coordination" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sensory System
The sensory nervous system is a part of the nervous system responsible for processing sensory information. A sensory system consists of sensory neurons (including the sensory receptor cells), neural pathways, and parts of the brain involved in sensory perception. Commonly recognized sensory systems are those for vision, hearing, touch, taste, smell, and balance. In short, senses are transducers from the physical world to the realm of the mind where we interpret the information, creating our perception of the world around us.[1]Organisms need information to solve at least three kinds of problems: (a) to maintain an appropriate environment, i.e., homeostasis; (b) to time activities (e.g., seasonal changes in behavior) or synchronize activities with those of conspecifics; and (c) to locate and respond to resources or threats (e.g., by moving towards resources or evading or attacking threats)
[...More...]

"Sensory System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pons
The pons is part of the brainstem, and in humans and other bipeds lies inferior to the midbrain, superior to the medulla oblongata and anterior to the cerebellum. The pons is also called the pons Varolii ("bridge of Varolius"), after the Italian anatomist and surgeon Costanzo Varolio
Costanzo Varolio
(1543–75).[1] This region of the brainstem includes neural pathways and tracts that conduct signals from the brain down to the cerebellum and medulla, and tracts that carry the sensory signals up into the thalamus.[2] The pons in humans measures about 2.5 centimetres (0.98 in) in length. Most of it appears as a broad anterior bulge rostral to the medulla. Posteriorly, it consists mainly of two pairs of thick stalks called cerebellar peduncles
[...More...]

"Pons" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fine Motor Skill
Fine motor skill
Fine motor skill
(or dexterity) is the coordination of small muscles, in movements—usually involving the synchronization of hands and fingers—with the eyes. The complex levels of manual dexterity that humans exhibit can be attributed to and demonstrated in tasks controlled by the nervous system. Fine motor skills aid in the growth of intelligence and develop continuously throughout the stages of human development.Contents1 Types of motor skills 2 Developmental stages2.1 Infancy 2.2 Toddlerhood 2.3 Preschool 2.4 School age3 Common problems 4 Assessment 5 References 6 External linksTypes of motor skills[edit] Motor skills are movements and actions of the bone structures. Typically, they are categorized into two groups: gross motor skills and fine motor skills. Gross motor skills are involved in movement and coordination of the arms, legs, and other large body parts and movements
[...More...]

"Fine Motor Skill" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Human Positions
Human positions refer to the different physical configurations that the human body can take.The human body is capable of a wide variety of positions, as exemplified by this energetic yoga poseThere are several synonyms that refer to human positioning, often used interchangeably, but having specific nuances of meaning.[1]Position is a general term for a configuration of the human body Posture means an intentionally or habitually assumed position Pose implies artistic or aesthetic intention of the position Attitude refers to postures assumed for purpose of imitation, intentional or not, as well as in some standard collocations in reference to some distinguished types of posture: " Freud
[...More...]

"Human Positions" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cerebral Hemisphere
The vertebrate cerebrum (brain) is formed by two cerebral hemispheres that are separated by a groove, the longitudinal fissure. The brain can thus be described as being divided into left and right cerebral hemispheres. Each of these hemispheres has an outer layer of grey matter, the cerebral cortex, that is supported by an inner layer of white matter. In eutherian (placental) mammals, the hemispheres are linked by the corpus callosum, a very large bundle of nerve fibers. Smaller commissures, including the anterior commissure, the posterior commissure and the fornix, also join the hemispheres and these are also present in other vertebrates
[...More...]

"Cerebral Hemisphere" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cognition
Cognition
Cognition
is "the mental action or process of acquiring knowledge and understanding through thought, experience, and the senses".[1] It encompasses processes such as knowledge, attention, memory and working memory, judgment and evaluation, reasoning and "computation", problem solving and decision making, comprehension and production of language. Human
Human
cognition is conscious and unconscious, concrete or abstract, as well as intuitive (like knowledge of a language) and conceptual (like a model of a language)
[...More...]

"Cognition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cerebral Cortex
The cerebral cortex is the largest region of the cerebrum in the mammalian brain and plays a key role in memory, attention, perception, cognition, awareness, thought, language, and consciousness.[1] The cerebral cortex is the most anterior (rostral) brain region and consists of an outer zone of neural tissue called gray matter, which contains neuronal cell bodies
[...More...]

"Cerebral Cortex" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Accordion
Depends on configuration: Right-hand manual Chromatic
Chromatic
button accordion Diatonic
Diatonic
button accordion
[...More...]

"Accordion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sensory-motor Coupling
Sensory-motor coupling
Sensory-motor coupling
is the coupling or integration of the sensory system and motor system. Sensorimotor integration is not a static process
[...More...]

"Sensory-motor Coupling" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Synaptic Plasticity
In neuroscience, synaptic plasticity is the ability of synapses to strengthen or weaken over time, in response to increases or decreases in their activity.[1] Since memories are postulated to be represented by vastly interconnected networks of synapses in the brain, synaptic plasticity is one of the important neurochemical foundations of learning and memory (see Hebbian theory). Plastic change often results from the alteration of the number of neurotransmitter receptors located on a synapse.[2] There are several underlying mechanisms that cooperate to achieve synaptic plasticity, including changes in the quantity of neurotransmitters released into a synapse and changes in how effectively cells respond to those neurotransmitters.[3] Synaptic plasticity in both excitatory and inhibitory synapses has
[...More...]

"Synaptic Plasticity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

David Marr (neuroscientist)
David Courtnay Marr (19 January 1945 – 17 November 1980) was a British neuroscientist and physiologist. Marr integrated results from psychology, artificial intelligence, and neurophysiology into new models of visual processing. His work was very influential in computational neuroscience and led to a resurgence of interest in the discipline.Contents1 Biography 2 Work2.1 Theories of cerebellum, hippocampus, and neocortex 2.2 Levels of analysis 2.3 Stages of vision3 See also 4 Publications 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Woodford, Essex, and educated at Rugby School; he was admitted at Trinity College, Cambridge
Trinity College, Cambridge
on 1 October 1963 (having been awarded the Lees Knowles Rugby Exhibition). He was awarded the Coutts Trotter Scholarship in 1966 and obtained his BA in mathematics the same year and got his PhD in physiology under Giles Brindley in 1972
[...More...]

"David Marr (neuroscientist)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.