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Cerdic Of Wessex
Cerdic (/ˈtʃɜːrdɪtʃ/) is cited in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
as a leader of the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain, being the founder and first king of Saxon Wessex, reigning from 519 to 534. Subsequent kings of Wessex
Wessex
all had some level of descent claimed in the Chronicle from Cerdic. (See House of Wessex
House of Wessex
family tree.)Contents1 Life 2 Origins 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Cerdic landed in what is today Hampshire
Hampshire
in 495 with his son Cynric in five ships. He is said to have fought a Brittonic king named Natanleod at Natanleaga and killed him thirteen years later (in 508) and to have fought at Cerdicesleag in 519. Natanleaga is commonly identified as Netley Marsh
Netley Marsh
in Hampshire and Cerdicesleag as Charford (Cerdic's Ford[1])
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List Of Monarchs Of Northumbria
The Kingdom of Northumbria (/nɔːrˈθʌmbriə/; Old English: Norþanhymbra rīce[1]) was a medieval Anglian kingdom in what is now northern England and south-east Scotland. The name derives from the Old English Norþan-hymbre meaning "the people or province north of the Humber,"[2] which reflects the approximate southern limit to the kingdom's territory, the Humber Estuary. Northumbria started to consolidate into one kingdom in the early seventh century. At its height, the kingdom extended from just south of the Humber to the River Mersey and to the Firth of Forth, in Scotland. Northumbria ceased to be an independent kingdom in the mid-tenth century. Northumbria is also used in the names of some North East regional institutions, particularly the police force (Northumbria Police, which covers Northumberland and Tyne and Wear), a university (Northumbria University) based in Newcastle upon Tyne and Northumbria Army Cadet Force, as well as the regionalist Northumbrian Association[3]
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Charles Oman
Sir Charles William Chadwick Oman KBE (12 January 1860 – 23 June 1946) was a British military historian. His reconstructions of medieval battles from the fragmentary and distorted accounts left by chroniclers were pioneering. Occasionally his interpretations have been challenged, especially his widely copied thesis that British troops defeated their Napoleonic opponents by firepower alone. Paddy Griffith, among modern historians, claims that the British infantry's discipline and willingness to attack were equally important.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Oman was born in Muzaffarpur district, India,[1] the son of a British planter, and was educated at Winchester College
Winchester College
and at Oxford University, where he studied under William Stubbs. In 1881 he was elected to a Prize Fellowship at All Souls College, where he remained for the rest of his academic career
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Saxon Shore
The Saxon Shore (Latin: litus Saxonicum) was a military command of the late Roman Empire, consisting of a series of fortifications on both sides of the English Channel. It was established in the late 3rd century and was led by the "Count of the Saxon Shore". In the late 4th century, his functions were limited to Britain, while the fortifications in Gaul were established as separate commands. Several Saxon Shore
Saxon Shore
forts survive in east and south-east England.Contents1 Background 2 Meaning of the term and role 3 The forts3.1 In Britain 3.2 In Gaul4 In popular culture 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit] During the latter half of the 3rd century, the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
faced a grave crisis. Internally, it was weakened by civil wars, the violent succession of brief emperors, and secession in the provinces, while externally it faced a new wave of attacks by "barbarian" tribes
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Ealdormen
An ealdorman (from Old English ealdorman, lit. "elder man"; plural: "ealdormen") was a high-ranking royal official and prior magistrate of an Anglo-Saxon shire or group of shires from about the ninth century to the time of King Cnut. The term "ealdorman" was rendered in Latin as dux in early West Saxon charters, and as præfectus (which is also the equivalent of gerefa, modern reeve, from which sheriff or shire reeve is derived)
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Germanus Of Auxerre
Germanus of Auxerre
Auxerre
(Welsh: Garmon Sant) (c. 378 – c. 448) was a bishop of Auxerre
Auxerre
in Late Antique Gaul. He abandoned a career as a high-ranking government official to devote his formidable energy towards the promotion of the church and the protection of his 'flock' in dangerous times: personally confronting, for instance, the barbarian king, "Goar". In Britain he is best remembered for his journey to combat Pelagianism
Pelagianism
in or around 429 AD, and the records of this visit provide valuable information on the state of post-Roman British society. He also played an important part in the establishment and promotion of the Cult
Cult
of Saint
Saint
Alban. The saint was said to have revealed the story of his martyrdom to Germanus in a dream or holy vision, and Germanus ordered this to be written down for public display
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Prosopography Of Anglo-Saxon England
The Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England
Anglo-Saxon England
(PASE) is a database and associated website that aims to collate everything that was written in contemporary records about anyone who lived in Anglo-Saxon England, in a prosopography.[1] The PASE online database[2] presents details (which it calls factoids) of the lives
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Cedda
Cedda (alternatively Cadda or Chad) was the second son of Cuthwine and consequently a member of the Wessex family. He was born c. 590 and his death date is unknown. He had one recorded son, Coenberht, the father of King Caedwalla of Wessex. His name is related to that of St Chad of Mercia (spelt Ceadda in Bede's Ecclesiastical History) and is derived from the Brythonic (British Celtic) root 'cat' or 'cad' meaning "battle."[1] It is one of a number of apparently Celtic names found in the West Saxon ruling family, including that of Cedda's grandson Caedwalla. Notes[edit]^ Koch, p. 360.Sources[edit] [1] - brief outline of Cedda.Koch, J.T., (2006) Celtic Culture: A Historical Encyclopedia, ABC-CLIO, ISBN 1-85109-440-7External links[edit]Cadda 1 at Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon EnglandThis biography of a peer, peeress or noble of the United Kingdom, or one or more of its constituent countries, is a stub
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Common Brittonic
Common Brittonic
Common Brittonic
was an ancient Celtic language spoken in Britain. It is also variously known as Old Brittonic, British, and Common or Old Brythonic
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John Speed
John Speed
John Speed
(1551 or 1552 – 28 July 1629) was an English cartographer and historian.[1][2][3] He is the best known English mapmaker of the Stuart period.[4][5][6][7]Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Legacy 4 Maps 5 Town inserts 6 Publications 7 References 8 External linksLife[edit] Speed was born at Farndon, Cheshire
Farndon, Cheshire
and went into the tailoring business of his father, Samuel, later in life.[8][9][10][11][12] While working in London, Speed was a tailor and member of a corresponding guild, and came to the attention of "learned" individuals.[13] These individuals included Sir Fulke Greville, who subsequently made him an allowance to enable him to devote his whole attention to research. By 1598 he had enough patronage to leave his manual labor job and "engage in full-time scholarship."[13] As a reward for his earlier efforts, Queen Elizabeth granted Speed the use of a room in the Custom House
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Patriarchs (Bible)
The Patriarchs (Hebrew: אבות‎ Avot or Abot, singular Hebrew: אב‎ Ab or Aramaic: אבא Abba) of the Bible, when narrowly defined, are Abraham, his son Isaac, and Isaac's son Jacob, also named Israel, the ancestor of the Israelites. These three figures are referred to collectively as the patriarchs of Judaism, and the period in which they lived is known as the patriarchal age. They play significant roles in Hebrew scripture during and following their lifetimes. They are used as a significant marker by God in revelations[1] and promises,[2] and continue to play important roles in the Abrahamic faiths. More widely, the term Patriarchs can be used to refer to the twenty male ancestor-figures between Adam
Adam
and Abraham. The first ten of these are called the Antediluvian
Antediluvian
patriarchs, because they came before the Flood
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Wōden
In Germanic mythology, Odin
Odin
(from Old Norse
Old Norse
Óðinn) is a widely revered god. In Norse mythology, from which stems most of the information about the god, Odin
Odin
is associated with wisdom, healing, death, royalty, the gallows, knowledge, battle, sorcery, poetry, frenzy, and the runic alphabet, and is the husband of the goddess Frigg
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Monarchy Of The United Kingdom
The monarchy of the United Kingdom, commonly referred to as the British monarchy, is the constitutional monarchy of the United Kingdom, its dependencies and its overseas territories. The current monarch and head of state, Queen Elizabeth II, ascended the throne on the death of her father, King George VI, on 6 February 1952. The monarch and his or her immediate family undertake various official, ceremonial, diplomatic and representational duties. As the monarchy is constitutional, the monarch is limited to non-partisan functions such as bestowing honours and appointing the Prime Minister. The monarch is commander-in-chief of the British Armed Forces
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