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Ceollach
CEOLLACH (or CELLACH) was a medieval Bishop of Mercia . His consecration dates and death dates are unknown. He was Irish by birth and was trained in Ireland. Before his death, he left or resigned his see and went to the monastery of Iona
Iona
. CITATIONS * ^ Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 220 * ^ Stenton Anglo-Saxon England p. 120 * ^ Blair World of Bede p. 105REFERENCES * Blair, Peter Hunter (1990). The World of Bede (Reprint of 1970 ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-39819-3 . * Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third revised ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-56350-X . * Stenton, F. M. (1971). Anglo-Saxon England (Third ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press
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Circa
CIRCA (from Latin , meaning 'around, about'), usually abbreviated C., CA. or CA (also CIRC. or CCA.), means "approximately" in several European languages (and as a loanword in English), usually in reference to a date. Circa is widely used in historical writing when the dates of events are not accurately known. When used in date ranges, circa is applied before each approximate date, while dates without circa immediately preceding them are generally assumed to be known with certainty. Circa should only be used for dates in the past. For example: * 1732–1799 or 1732–99: both years are known precisely. * c. 1732 – 1799: only the end year is known accurately; the start year is approximate. * 1732 – c. 1799: only the start year is known accurately; the end year is approximate. * c. 1732 – c. 1799: both years are approximate.SEE ALSO * Floruit REFERENCES * ^ "circa". Dictionary.com
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Prosopography Of Anglo-Saxon England
The PROSOPOGRAPHY OF ANGLO-SAXON ENGLAND (PASE) is a database and associated website that aims to collate everything that was written in contemporary records about anyone who lived in Anglo-Saxon England
Anglo-Saxon England
, in a prosopography . The PASE online database presents details (which it calls factoids ) of the lives of every recorded individual who lived in, or was closely connected with, Anglo-Saxon England
Anglo-Saxon England
from 597 to 1087, with specific citations to (and often quotations from) each primary source describing each factoid. PASE was funded by the British Arts and Humanities Research Council from 2000 to 2008 as a major research project based at King\'s College London in the Department of History and the Centre for Computing in the Humanities, and at the Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, University of Cambridge
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Wilferth
WILFERTH was a medieval Bishop of Lichfield
Bishop of Lichfield
. Wilferth was consecrated between 889 and 900 and died between 909 and 915. There is some confusion between Wilferth and another bishop, Wigmund . The surviving charters do not explicitly specify which was bishop of where. There is therefore also a possibility that it was Wigmund who was bishop of Lichfield, and Wilferth bishop of Dorchester. CITATIONS * ^ Fryde Handbook of British Chronology p. 218REFERENCES * Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third Edition, revised ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
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Peter Of Lichfield
LICHFIELD /ˈlɪtʃfiːld/ is a cathedral city and civil parish in Staffordshire , England . One of eight civil parishes with city status in England, Lichfield is situated roughly 16 mi (26 km) north of Birmingham . At the time of the 2011 Census the population was estimated at 32,219 and the wider Lichfield District at 100,700. Notable for its three-spired medieval cathedral , Lichfield was the birthplace of Samuel Johnson , the writer of the first authoritative Dictionary of the English Language . The city's recorded history began when Chad of Mercia arrived to establish his Bishopric in 669 AD and the settlement grew as the ecclesiastical centre of Mercia . In 2009, the Staffordshire Hoard , the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork, was found 5.9 km (3.7 mi) south-west of Lichfield
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Ealdwulf Of Lichfield
LICHFIELD /ˈlɪtʃfiːld/ is a cathedral city and civil parish in Staffordshire , England . One of eight civil parishes with city status in England, Lichfield is situated roughly 16 mi (26 km) north of Birmingham . At the time of the 2011 Census the population was estimated at 32,219 and the wider Lichfield District at 100,700. Notable for its three-spired medieval cathedral , Lichfield was the birthplace of Samuel Johnson , the writer of the first authoritative Dictionary of the English Language . The city's recorded history began when Chad of Mercia arrived to establish his Bishopric in 669 AD and the settlement grew as the ecclesiastical centre of Mercia . In 2009, the Staffordshire Hoard , the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork, was found 5.9 km (3.7 mi) south-west of Lichfield
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Frank Stenton
SIR FRANK MERRY STENTON (17 May 1880 – 15 September 1967) was a 20th-century historian of Anglo-Saxon England
England
, and president of the Royal Historical Society (1937-1945). He was the author of Anglo-Saxon England, a volume of the Oxford History of England
England
, first published in 1943 and widely considered a classic history of the period. He delivered the Ford Lectures at Oxford University
Oxford University
in 1929. Stenton was a professor of history at the University of Reading (1926-1946), and subsequently the university's vice-chancellor (1946-1950). During Stenton's period as vice-chancellor at Reading, he presided over the university's purchase of Whiteknights Park , creating the new campus that allowed for the expansion of the university in later decades
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Christianity
CHRISTIANITY is a universalising Abrahamic monotheistic religion based on the life , teachings , and miracles of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth
Nazareth
, known by Christians
Christians
as the Christ , or "Messiah", who is the focal point of the Christian
Christian
faiths . It is the world\'s largest religion , with over 2.4 billion followers, or 33% of the global population, known as Christians
Christians
. Christians
Christians
make up a majority of the population in 158 countries and territories . They believe that Jesus
Jesus
is the Son of God
God
and the savior of humanity whose coming as the Messiah
Messiah
(the Christ ) was prophesied in the Old Testament
Old Testament

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Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
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Iona
IONA ( Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
: Ì Chaluim Chille) is a small island in the Inner Hebrides off the Ross of Mull on the western coast of Scotland
Scotland
. It was a centre of Gaelic monasticism for four centuries and is today known for its relative tranquility and natural environment. It is a tourist destination and a place for spiritual retreats . Its modern Gaelic name means " Iona
Iona
of (Saint) Columba
Columba
" (formerly anglicised "Icolmkill")
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Peter Hunter Blair
PETER HUNTER BLAIR (1912–September 1982) was an English academic and historian specializing in the Anglo-Saxon period . In 1969 he married the children's author, Pauline Clarke . She edited his Anglo-Saxon Northumbria in 1984. Hunter Blair was a fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge
Emmanuel College, Cambridge
and Reader in the Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, University of Cambridge . His published works include: * Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation and Its Importance Today: Jarrow Lecture 1959. Jarrow Lectures. 1959. * An Introduction to Anglo-Saxon England, with a new introduction by Simon Keynes (Third ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Cambridge University Press
. 2003 . ISBN 0-521-53777-0 . * Roman Britain and Early England: 55 B.C. – A.D. 871. Norton Library History of England. Edinburgh & New York: Nelson , W. W. Norton & Company . 1963
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International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
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Eadberht Of Lichfield
EADBERHT was a medieval Bishop of Lichfield
Bishop of Lichfield
(or perhaps Bishop of Lindsey ). Eadberht is known from three charters which he witnessed as bishop, in 869, 875 and 875. However the charters do not identify where he was Bishop of, so it is possible that Burgheard , who also signed the 869 charter, was bishop of Lichfield rather than Lindsey, and vice versa. Eadberht was consecrated between 866 and 869. He died after 875. CITATIONS * ^ Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 219REFERENCES * Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third revised ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
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Wynsige Of Lichfield
WYNSIGE (died 975) was a medieval Bishop of Lichfield . Wynsige was consecrated between 963 and 964 and died in 975. NOTES * ^ Or WYNSY or WINSEY or WINSIUSCITATIONS * ^ Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 218REFERENCES * Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third revised ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press
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Wulfred Of Lichfield
WULFRED (died c. 895) was a medieval Bishop of Lichfield
Bishop of Lichfield
. Wulfred was consecrated either between 869 and 883 or 875 and 883 and died between 889 and 900. CITATIONS * ^ Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 218REFERENCES * Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third revised ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press
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Elphege Of Lichfield
ELPHEGE (or ÆLFHEAH; died c. 1003) was a medieval Bishop of Lichfield . Elphege was consecrated in 975 and died between 1002 and 1004. CITATIONS * ^ Fyde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 219REFERENCES * Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third revised ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press
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