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Ceollach
Ceollach (or Cellach) was a medieval Bishop of Mercia. His consecration dates and death dates are unknown.[1] He was Irish by birth and was trained in Ireland.[2] Before his death, he left or resigned his see and went to the monastery of Iona.[3] Citations[edit]^ Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 220 ^ Stenton Anglo-Saxon England p. 120 ^ Blair World of Bede p. 105References[edit]Blair, Peter Hunter (1990). The World of Bede (Reprint of 1970 ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-39819-3.  Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third revised ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-56350-X.  Stenton, F. M. (1971). Anglo-Saxon England (Third ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press
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Christianity
Christianity[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic[1] religion based on the life, teachings, and miracles of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, known by Christians
Christians
as the Christ, or "Messiah", who is the focal point of the Christian
Christian
faiths
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Iona
Iona (Scottish Gaelic: Ì Chaluim Chille) is a small island in the Inner Hebrides off the Ross of Mull on the western coast of Scotland. It is mainly known for Iona Abbey, though there are other buildings on the island. Iona Abbey was a centre of Gaelic monasticism for three centuries[3] and is today known for its relative tranquility and natural environment.[6] It is a tourist destination and a place for spiritual retreats
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Peter Hunter Blair
Peter Hunter Blair (1912–September 1982) was an English academic and historian specializing in the Anglo-Saxon period. In 1969 he married the children's author, Pauline Clarke. She edited his Anglo-Saxon Northumbria in 1984.[1] Hunter Blair was a fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge
Emmanuel College, Cambridge
and Reader in the Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, University of Cambridge.[2] His published works include:Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation and Its Importance Today: Jarrow Lecture 1959. Jarrow Lectures. 1959.  An Introduction to Anglo-Saxon England, with a new introduction by Simon Keynes (Third ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 2003 [1956]. ISBN 0-521-53777-0.  Roman Britain and Early England: 55 B.C. – A.D. 871. Norton Library History of England. Edinburgh & New York: Nelson, W. W. Norton & Company. 1963. ISBN 0-351-15318-7.  The Coming of Pout
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Frank Stenton
Sir Frank Merry Stenton (17 May 1880 – 15 September 1967) was a 20th-century historian of Anglo-Saxon England, and president of the Royal Historical Society (1937–1945).[1] He was the author of Anglo-Saxon England, a volume of the Oxford History of England, first published in 1943 and widely considered a classic history of the period. He delivered the Ford Lectures
Ford Lectures
at Oxford University
Oxford University
in 1929. Stenton was a professor of history at the University of Reading (1926-1946), and subsequently the university's vice-chancellor (1946-1950). During Stenton's period as vice-chancellor at Reading, he presided over the university's purchase of Whiteknights Park, creating the new campus that allowed for the expansion of the university in later decades
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Prosopography Of Anglo-Saxon England
The Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England
Anglo-Saxon England
(PASE) is a database and associated website that aims to collate everything that was written in contemporary records about anyone who lived in Anglo-Saxon England, in a prosopography.[1] The PASE online database[2] presents details (which it calls factoids) of the lives
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Circa
Circa
Circa
(from Latin, meaning 'around, about'), usually abbreviated c., ca. or ca (also circ. or cca.), means "approximately" in several European languages (and as a loanword in English), usually in reference to a date.[1] Circa
Circa
is widely used in historical writing when the dates of events are not accurately known. When used in date ranges, circa is applied before each approximate date, while dates without circa immediately preceding them are generally assumed to be known with certainty
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Wilferth
Wilferth was a medieval Bishop of Lichfield. Wilferth was consecrated between 889 and 900 and died between 909 and 915.[1] Citations[edit]^ Fryde Handbook of British Chronology p. 218References[edit]Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third Edition, revised ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-56350-X. External links[edit]Wilfrith 4 at Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England (as Bishop of Lichfield)Christian titlesPreceded by Wulfred Bishop of Lichfield c. 895–c. 912 Succeeded by ÆlfwineThis article about a United Kingdom bishop is a stub
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Cynesige Of Lichfield
Cynesige[a] (died c. 963) was a medieval Bishop of Lichfield. Cynesige
Cynesige
was consecrated between 946 and 949 and died between 963 and 964.[1] He was a relative of Dunstan
Dunstan
and left the king's court soon after the coronation of King Eadwig of England
Eadwig of England
in January 956, along with Dunstan
Dunstan
who was Abbot of Glastonbury at the time. The Life of Dunstan
Dunstan
states that the reason the bishop and abbot were dismissed from court was that they denounced the new king and his new bride Ælfgifu.[2] Notes[edit]^ Or Kynsy or Kinsey or KinsiusCitations[edit]^ Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 218 ^ Stafford Unification and Conquest pp. 47-48References[edit]Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third revised ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press
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Elphege Of Lichfield
Elphege (or Ælfheah; died c. 1003) was a medieval Bishop of Lichfield. Elphege was consecrated in 975 and died between 1002 and 1004.[1] Citations[edit]^ Fyde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 219References[edit]Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third revised ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-56350-X. External links[edit] Ælfheah 36 at Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon EnglandChristian titlesPreceded by Wynsige Bishop of Lichfield 975–c
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Wynsige Of Lichfield
Wynsige[a] (died 975) was a medieval Bishop of Lichfield. Wynsige was consecrated between 963 and 964 and died in 975.[1] Notes[edit]^ Or Wynsy or Winsey or WinsiusCitations[edit]^ Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 218References[edit]Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third revised ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-56350-X. External links[edit]Wynnsige 20 at Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon EnglandChristian titlesPreceded by Cynesige Bishop of Lichfield c
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Gerard La Pucelle
Gerard la Pucelle (sometimes Gerard Pucelle;[1] c. 1117 – 13 January 1184) was a peripatetic Anglo-French scholar of canon law, clerk, and Bishop of Coventry.Contents1 Life 2 Notes 3 Citations 4 References 5 Further readingLife[edit] Gerard was possibly born in England, taught canon law[a] at the University of Paris
University of Paris
in the 1150s, when the study of the discipline of the Church was first differentiated from theology, spurred by the collections of church decretals that began with the Decretum Gratiani assembled by a monk at the University of Bologna. Among his surviving texts are glosses on the Decretum manuscripts to be found among the manuscripts of Durham Cathedral[b] and glosses in the Summa Lipsiensis,[c] in the Summa Parisiensis,[d] and elsewhere. Gerard added to the standard collection from which he taught
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Wulfgar Of Lichfield
Wulfgar (died c. 947) was a medieval Bishop of Lichfield. Wulfgar was consecrated between 935 and 941 and died between 946 and 949.[1] He is known to history from William of Malmesbury,[2] a number of royal charters, some land grants made by him and as witness in several assorted contractual documents from the 10th century. Citations[edit]^ Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 218 ^ William of Malmesbury
William of Malmesbury
Gesta Pontificum Anglorum iv.172.2References[edit]Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third revised ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-56350-X. External links[edit]Wulfgar 9 at Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon EnglandChristian titlesPreceded by Ælfwine Bishop of Lichfield c. 937–c
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Ælfwine Of Lichfield
Ælfwine or Ælle (died c. 937) was a medieval Bishop of Lichfield. He was consecrated between 903 and 915 and died between 935 and 941.[1] Ælfwine appears to have had a close relationship with King Æthelstan. Ælfwine was probably close to Æthelstan
Æthelstan
before he became king, and consistently attested the king's charters in a more prominent position than his status should have entitled him to. The historian Sarah Foot has suggested that Ælfwine may have been the " Æthelstan
Æthelstan
A", the name given by historians to the draftsman who crafted unusually detailed charters between 928 and 935, as he ceased witnessing at the same time as the Æthelstan
Æthelstan
A charters ended.[2] Citations[edit]^ Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 218 ^ Foot Æthelstan
Æthelstan
pp
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