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Centre Georges Pompidou
Centre Georges Pompidou
Georges Pompidou
(French pronunciation: ​[sɑ̃tʁ ʒɔʁʒ pɔ̃pidu]), commonly shortened to Centre Pompidou and also known as the Pompidou Centre in English, is a complex building in the Beaubourg
Beaubourg
area of the 4th arrondissement of Paris, near Les Halles, rue Montorgueil, and the Marais. It was designed in the style of high-tech architecture by the architectural team of Richard Rogers
Richard Rogers
and Renzo Piano, along with Gianfranco Franchini. It houses the Bibliothèque publique d'information (Public Information Library), a vast public library; the Musée National d'Art Moderne, which is the largest museum for modern art in Europe; and IRCAM, a centre for music and acoustic research
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Pablo Picasso
Pablo Picasso
Picasso
(/pɪˈkɑːsoʊ, -ˈkæsoʊ/;[2] Spanish: [ˈpaβlo piˈkaso]; 25 October 1881 – 8 April 1973) was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, stage designer, poet and playwright who spent most of his adult life in France. Regarded as one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist
Cubist
movement, the invention of constructed sculpture,[3][4] the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore. Among his most famous works are the proto- Cubist
Cubist
Les Demoiselles d' Avignon
Avignon
(1907), and Guernica (1937), a dramatic portrayal of the bombing of Guernica by the German and Italian airforces. Picasso
Picasso
demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a naturalistic manner through his childhood and adolescence
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Stravinsky Fountain
The Stravinsky Fountain (French: La Fontaine Stravinsky) is a whimsical public fountain ornamented with sixteen works of sculpture, moving and spraying water, representing the works of composer Igor Stravinsky. It was created in 1983 by sculptors Jean Tinguely and Niki de Saint Phalle, and is located on Place Stravinsky, next to the Centre Pompidou, in Paris.[1]Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Tinguely on the fountain 4 Critical reaction 5 See also 6 Sources and citations 7 BibliographyDescription[edit] The Stravinsky Fountain is a shallow basin of 580 square metres (6,200 sq ft) located in Place Stravinsky, between the Centre Pompidou and the Church of Saint-Merri. Within the basin are sixteen works of sculpture inspired by Igor Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring, and his other major works
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Loch Ness
Loch
Loch
Ness (/ˌlɒx ˈnɛs/; Scottish Gaelic: Loch
Loch
Nis [l̪ˠɔx ˈniʃ]) is a large, deep, freshwater loch in the Scottish Highlands extending for approximately 37 kilometres (23 miles) southwest of Inverness. Its surface is 16 metres (52 feet) above sea level. Loch Ness is best known for alleged sightings of the cryptozoological Loch Ness Monster, also known affectionately as "Nessie". It is connected at the southern end by the River Oich
River Oich
and a section of the Caledonian Canal to Loch
Loch
Oich. At the northern end there is the Bona Narrows which opens out into Loch
Loch
Dochfour, which feeds the River Ness
River Ness
and a further section of canal to Inverness, ultimately leading to the North Sea via the Moray Firth
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Pritzker Prize
The Pritzker Architecture
Architecture
Prize is awarded annually "to honor a living architect or architects whose built work demonstrates a combination of those qualities of talent, vision and commitment, which has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity and the built environment through the art of architecture."[1] Founded in 1979 by Jay A. Pritzker and his wife Cindy, the award is funded by the Pritzker family and sponsored by the Hyatt
Hyatt
Foundation
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Plumbing
Plumbing
Plumbing
is any system that conveys fluids for a wide range of applications
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Climate Control
Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC)[1] is the technology of indoor and vehicular environmental comfort. Its goal is to provide thermal comfort and acceptable indoor air quality. HVAC
HVAC
system design is a subdiscipline of mechanical engineering, based on the principles of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer
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Electrical
Electricity
Electricity
is the set of physical phenomena associated with the presence and motion of electric charge. Although initially considered a phenomenon separate from magnetism, since the development of Maxwell's equations, both are recognized as part of a single phenomenon: electromagnetism. Various common phenomena are related to electricity, including lightning, static electricity, electric heating, electric discharges and many others. The presence of an electric charge, which can be either positive or negative, produces an electric field. The movement of electric charges is an electric current and produces a magnetic field. When a charge is placed in a location with a non-zero electric field, a force will act on it. The magnitude of this force is given by Coulomb's law. Thus, if that charge were to move, the electric field would be doing work on the electric charge
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Circulation (architecture)
In architecture, circulation refers to the way people move through and interact with a building.[1] In public buildings, circulation is of high importance; Structures such as elevators, escalators, and staircases are often referred to as circulation elements, as they are positioned and designed to optimize the flow of people through a building, sometimes through the use of a core. In some situations, one-way circulation is desirable. References[edit]^ http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/118392/circulation "circulation (architecture)" in Britannica Online EncyclopediaThis architectural element–related article is a stub
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Fire Extinguishers
A fire extinguisher is an active fire protection device used to extinguish or control small fires, often in emergency situations. It is not intended for use on an out-of-control fire, such as one which has reached the ceiling, endangers the user (i.e., no escape route, smoke, explosion hazard, etc.), or otherwise requires the expertise of a fire brigade. Typically, a fire extinguisher consists of a hand-held cylindrical pressure vessel containing an agent which can be discharged to extinguish a fire. Fire
Fire
extinguishers manufactured with non-cylindrical pressure vessels also exist, but are less common.A stored-pressure fire extinguisher made by Oval Brand Fire
Fire
ProductsIn the United States, fire extinguishers in all buildings other than houses are generally required to be serviced and inspected by a fire protection service company at least annually. Some jurisdictions require more frequent service for fire extinguishers
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French Franc
The franc (/fræŋk/; French: [fʁɑ̃]; sign: F or Fr),[n 2] also commonly distinguished as the French franc
French franc
(FF), was a currency of France. Between 1360 and 1641, it was the name of coins worth 1 livre tournois and it remained in common parlance as a term for this amount of money. It was reintroduced (in decimal form) in 1795. It was revalued in 1960, with each new franc (NF) being worth 100 old francs. The NF designation was continued for a few years before the currency returned to being simply the franc; the French continued to reference and value items in terms of the old franc (equivalent to the new centime) until the introduction of the euro in 1999 (for accounting purposes) and 2002 (for coins and banknotes)
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Jean Tinguely
Jean Tinguely
Jean Tinguely
(22 May 1925 – 30 August 1991) was a Swiss painter and sculptor. He is best known for his sculptural machines or kinetic art, in the Dada
Dada
tradition; known officially as metamechanics. Tinguely's art satirized the mindless overproduction of material goods in advanced industrial society.Contents1 Life 2 Public works2.1 Hon-en-Katedrall3 Noise music recordings 4 Influence on others 5 See also 6 Further reading 7 References 8 External linksLife[edit] Born in Fribourg, Tinguely grew up in Basel, but moved to France in 1952 with his first wife, Swiss artist Eva Aeppli,[1] to pursue a career in art
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Postmodern Architecture
Postmodern
Postmodern
architecture is a style or movement which emerged in the 1960s as a reaction against the austerity, formality, and lack of variety of modern architecture, particularly in the international style advocated by Le Corbusier
Le Corbusier
and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. The movement was given a doctrine by the architect and architectural theorist Robert Venturi
Robert Venturi
in his 1966 book Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture. The style flourished from the 1980s through the 1990s, particularly in the work of Venturi, Philip Johnson, Charles Moore and Michael Graves
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Igor Stravinsky
Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (Russian: И́горь Фёдорович Страви́нский, IPA: [ˈiɡərʲ ˈfʲɵdərəvʲɪtɕ strɐˈvʲinskʲɪj]; 17 June [O.S. 5 June] 1882 – 6 April 1971) was a Russian-born composer, pianist, and conductor. He is widely considered one of the most important and influential composers of the 20th century. Stravinsky's compositional career was notable for its stylistic diversity. He first achieved international fame with three ballets commissioned by the impresario Serge Diaghilev
Serge Diaghilev
and first performed in Paris by Diaghilev's Ballets Russes: The Firebird
The Firebird
(1910), Petrushka (1911), and The Rite of Spring
The Rite of Spring
(1913)
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French Language
French (le français [lə fʁɑ̃sɛ] ( listen) or la langue française [la lɑ̃ɡ fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is a Romance language
Romance language
of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French has evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin
Latin
in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France
France
and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages
Celtic languages
of Northern Roman Gaul
Gaul
like Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders
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