HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Central Park (pinball)
Central Park is a pinball machine that was released by Gottlieb
Gottlieb
in 1966. The game was sold in 3,100 units. It was designed by Ed Krynski and the art was done by Roy Parker.[1]Contents1 Gameplay 2 Digital versions 3 References 4 External linksGameplay[edit] Central Park is a very difficult game due to the large gap between the flippers. The goal of the game is to raise a special called the Tree Bonus by collecting numbers. The player can collect numbers by hitting targets at the top of the playfield. Every time 100 points are scored in Central Park an animated monkey on the backglass will ring a bell. Hitting the 7 and 9 would light up a bumper, earning 10 points instead of the usual 1
[...More...]

"Central Park (pinball)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pinball Machine
Pinball
Pinball
is a type of arcade game, in which points are scored by a player manipulating one or more steel balls on a play field inside a glass-covered cabinet called a pinball machine (or "pinball table"). The primary objective of the game is to score as many points as possible. Many modern pinball machines include a story line where the player must complete certain objectives in a certain fashion to complete the story, usually earning high scores for different methods of completing the game. Points are earned when the ball strikes different targets on the play field. A drain is situated at the bottom of the play field, partially protected by player-controlled plastic bats called flippers. A game ends after all the balls fall into the drain a certain number of times
[...More...]

"Pinball Machine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Playfield
A pitch or a sports ground is an outdoor playing area for various sports. The term pitch is most commonly used in British English, while the comparable term in American and Canadian English
Canadian English
is playing field or sports field. In most sports the official term is field of play, although this is not regularly used by those outside refereeing/umpiring circles.[citation needed] The field of play generally includes out-of-bounds areas that a player is likely to enter while playing a match, such as the area beyond the touchlines in association football and rugby or the sidelines in American and Canadian football, or the "foul territory" in baseball. The surface of a pitch is most commonly composed of sod (grass), but may also be artificial turf, sand, clay, gravel, concrete, or other materials
[...More...]

"Playfield" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Monkey
HominoideaMonkeys are non-hominoid simians, generally possessing tails and consisting of about 260 known living species. Many monkey species are tree-dwelling (arboreal), although there are species that live primarily on the ground, such as baboons. Most species are also active during the day (diurnal). Monkeys are generally considered to be intelligent, particularly Old World monkeys. There are two major types of monkey: New World monkeys (platyrrhines) from South and Central America and Old World monkeys
Old World monkeys
(catarrhines of the superfamily Cercopithecoidea) from Africa and Asia
[...More...]

"Monkey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pinball Hall Of Fame
The Pinball
Pinball
Hall of Fame is a museum for pinball machines that opened in Paradise, Nevada
Paradise, Nevada
in January 2006. It is located at 1610 E Tropicana Ave. The museum is a project of the Las Vegas Pinball
Pinball
Collectors Club, and it features pinball machines from all eras, including some very rare machines such as Williams' Black Gold, Bally's Pinball
Pinball
Circus and Recreativos Franco's Impacto. It features over 200 different pinball games, including some classic video arcade games and other novelty machines of the past and present. The Pinball
Pinball
Hall of Fame is a nonprofit venture and its creation came about in part due to donations, which are still accepted
[...More...]

"Pinball Hall Of Fame" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Black Hole (pinball)
Black Hole is a pinball game released in 1981 by Gottlieb. It is notable for having two playfields: one on top with a conventional slope, and one mounted underneath, sloping away from the player. It has no connection with the 1979 film of the same name.Contents1 Description 2 Features 3 Appearances in pop culture 4 Digital versions 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] Black Hole was the first machine to feature a lower playfield viewed through a window in the upper playfield
[...More...]

"Black Hole (pinball)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bally Technologies
Bally Technologies, Inc. is a manufacturer of slot machines and other gaming technology based in Enterprise, Nevada. It is owned by Scientific Games Corporation. The company was founded in 1968 as Advanced Patent Technology. It eventually changed its name to Alliance Gaming and acquired, in 1996, Bally Gaming International, a former division of Bally Manufacturing. In 2006, the entire company adopted the Bally name. Scientific Games acquired the company in 2014
[...More...]

"Bally Technologies" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bram Stoker's Dracula (pinball)
Bram Stoker's Dracula
Dracula
is a 1993 pinball machine released by Williams. It was based in the 1992 film of the same name.[1]Contents1 Description 2 Digital Versions 3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] The game was characterized by its unusual blood-red DMD display (most other games at the time used orange for their color) as well as a "Multi-Multi-Ball" mode, where up to three different multiball variations could be active at the same time, with each successive active mode providing a jackpot multiplier of up to 3x
[...More...]

"Bram Stoker's Dracula (pinball)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Safe Cracker (pinball)
Safe Cracker is a pinball machine with a safecracking theme, designed by Pat Lawlor, and distributed by Midway (under the Bally label). It was created in 1996. About 1148 were manufactured. Description[edit] Safe Cracker differs from a standard pinball game in that the player is playing against the clock as opposed to having a certain number of balls available. If the player loses a ball, as long as there is time left on the clock they can continue playing. The machine is smaller in size than a standard pinball machine. The main objective of the game is to break into the bank's safe. The game can be broken into 3 areas of play:The pinball playfield has numerous targets, the completion of which will allow entry into the bank via the rooftop, the cellar, or the front door. Once the player has entered the bank, the game changes to a boardgame that takes place on the backglass
[...More...]

"Safe Cracker (pinball)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Doctor Who (pinball)
Doctor Who
Doctor Who
is a pinball machine designed by Bill Pfutzenreuter (Pfutz) and Barry Oursler, and released by Midway (under the Bally brand name) in September 1992. It is based on the television series Doctor Who. As stated in the Gameplay section, the rulesheet is rather different from other pinball machines released at the time, which didn't help popularity (and even now it is still seen as an exotic machine amongst collectors) as casual players did not understand the complex rule changes that occur during the game. The first 100 games included a moving Dalek
Dalek
topper that would turn side-to-side while the robot was speaking.[1] The effect was achieved by fitting the robot's body with a complex motor, cam, and optoelectronics system
[...More...]

"Doctor Who (pinball)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dr. Dude And His Excellent Ray
Dr. Dude and His Excellent Ray is a pinball machine designed by Dennis Nordman and released in 1990 by Midway (under the Bally label).[1] The theme of the game revolves around gaining coolness.Contents1 Gameplay 2 Description 3 Digital versions 4 References 5 External linksGameplay[edit] The ultimate goal of the game is to become a cool Super Dude by visiting the kinetic clinic with the excellent ray as a treatment.[2] To achieve this, the player has at first to collect the ingredients of ultimate hipness to increase the Dude-O-Meter: the Heart of Rock 'n' Roll, a Magnetic Personality, and the Gift of gab.[3] Further gameplay features include the Excellent Ray to start multiball, Big Shot - a bully figure that insults the player, the Molecular Mixmaster - a spinning disc with a rubber post on it, surrounded by targets and a Gazillion point shot with scoring that potentially multiple millions of points.[2][4] Description[edit] Dr
[...More...]

"Dr. Dude And His Excellent Ray" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Eight Ball Deluxe
Eight Ball Deluxe
Eight Ball Deluxe
is a pinball machine designed by George Christian and released by Bally in 1981. The game features a cue sports theme and was so successful that it was produced again in 1984.[1]Contents1 Description 2 Digital versions 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] The game is the successor of the popular Eight Ball pinball machine from 1977. In Eight Ball Deluxe, Bally added more rules, complicated shot combinations, and speech synthesis. The pinball machine is still very popular today[2] and was followed by the pinball machine Eight Ball Champ in 1985.[3] Eight Ball Deluxe
Eight Ball Deluxe
has two sets of drop targets, one set for the billiard balls 1-7 and 9-15, and four in line drop targets for bonus multiplier. Behind the 1-7 drop targets are stand up targets that spells out 'Deluxe'. If the player spells the last letter of 'Deluxe', the game gives three free games
[...More...]

"Eight Ball Deluxe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Elvira And The Party Monsters
Elvira
Elvira
and the Party Monsters is a 1989 pinball game designed by Dennis Nordman and Jim Patla and released by Midway (under the Bally label), featuring horrorshow-hostess Elvira. It was followed 1996 by Scared Stiff, also designed by Nordman.Contents1 Description 2 Digital version 3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] The marketing slogan " Elvira
Elvira
is No Cheap Date!" referring to the new .50/.75/1.00 pricing scheme.[1] Elvira
Elvira
and the Party Monsters was made shortly after the merger of Williams and Bally. Although the game uses a vaguely Bally-style cabinet and flippers, all the rest of the game hardware are completely made up of Williams parts
[...More...]

"Elvira And The Party Monsters" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fireball (pinball)
Fireball is a historically notable pinball machine designed by Ted Zale and released by Bally in 1972. The table was one of the first to have a modern sci-fi/fantasy type of outer space theme and featured elaborate, painted artwork on the sides of the table, painted by Dave Christensen.Contents1 Description 2 FireBall Professional Home model 3 Cultural references 4 Digital version 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] The game itself is notable as it featured several pinball innovations, including a spinning disc, moveable "zipper" flippers, and trapped ball bonuses. Fireball was also an early table to have the multi-ball (three balls, in this case) feature. Fireball's main surface and raised surface also featured elaborate artwork of a flaming "fire man", flames, and stars in space
[...More...]

"Fireball (pinball)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Indianapolis 500 (pinball)
Indianapolis 500
Indianapolis 500
is a pinball machine designed by Dennis Nordman and produced by Midway (under the Bally brand name) released in June 1995. It is based on the sporting event of the same name.Contents1 Description 2 Digital versions 3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] The three voices in the game are commentators Paul Page
Paul Page
(longtime "Voice of the '500'"), and 3 time Indy 500 winner Bobby Unser, and the announcer Tom Carnegie, who was a legend at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway for 50 years.[1] This game has no sink-holes and lots of targets and is one of the first pinball machines to feature light up targets. Such an object is a square plastic target, that is a little larger than one of the RIVER targets in White Water, or the REPAIR targets in Doctor Who and divided into four quadrants. Each quadrant can light up
[...More...]

"Indianapolis 500 (pinball)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Judge Dredd (pinball)
Judge Dredd
Judge Dredd
is a four-player pinball game produced by Bally Manufacturing in 1993, based on the British comic strip Judge Dredd
Judge Dredd
in 2000 AD.[1] Nearly 7,000 were made. An eight-page full colour promotional comic was released by Bally and Egmont in 1993, which reprinted the story Pinboing Wizard from the Judge Dredd
Judge Dredd
Annual 1981, written by Judge Dredd
Judge Dredd
creator John Wagner and illustrated by Mike McMahon.[2]Contents1 Gameplay 2 Multiball 3 Super Multiball 4 Later releases 5 Marketing slogans 6 Digital version 7 References 8 External linksGameplay[edit] There are 2 types of games to choose from in Judge Dredd. Regulation game for 1 Credit, or Super Game for 2 Credits
[...More...]

"Judge Dredd (pinball)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.