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Central Congolian Lowland Forests
The Central Congolese lowland forests are an ecoregion within the Democratic Republic of the Congo. This is a remote, inaccessible area of low-lying dense wet forest, undergrowth and swamp in the Cuvette Centrale region of the Congo Basin
Congo Basin
south of the arc of the River Congo.[1]Contents1 Fauna 2 Threats and conservation 3 Urban areas and settlements 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksFauna[edit] The region has been insufficiently researched by zoologists but is known to be home to antelopes, forest elephants, and several primates, including the rare bonobo (Pan paniscus), De Brazza's monkey, crested mangabey and the lowland gorilla. There is only one known strictly endemic mammal, the Dryas monkey
Dryas monkey
(Cercopithecus dryas)
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Golden-bellied Mangabey
The golden-bellied mangabey (Cercocebus chrysogaster) is a social Old World monkey found in swampy, humid forests south of the Congo River in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It was previously considered a subspecies of the agile mangabey (C. agilis).[1] Little is published about the species and its behaviour has only been studied in captivity. The only known photograph of golden-bellied mangabeys in the wild is shown in this article and a link to a video can be found in "External links" below. References[edit]^ a b Groves, C.P. (2005). Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M., eds. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 153. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. OCLC 62265494.  ^ Hart, J.; Butynski, T. M. & De Jong, Y. (2008). "Cercocebus chrysogaster". The IUCN Red List
IUCN Red List
of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2008: e.T4207A10643145
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Lowland Gorilla
The western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) is one of two subspecies of the western gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) that lives in montane, primary and secondary forests and lowland swamps in central Africa in Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea and Gabon. It is the nominate subspecies of the western gorilla, and smallest of the four gorilla subspecies. The Western lowland gorilla is the only subspecies kept in zoos with the exception of Amahoro, a female Eastern lowland gorilla at Antwerp Zoo and a few Mountain gorillas kept captive in Democratic Republic of the Congo.[2]Contents1 Description1.1 Albinism2 Behavior2.1 Social structure 2.2 Reproduction3 Intelligence3.1 Use of tools 3.2 Communication4 Ecology4.1 Habitat 4.2 Diet5 Relationship with humans5.1 Threats5.1.1 Hunting and logging 5.1.2 Population decline and re
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Ikela
Ikela
Ikela
is a market town in Tshuapa, Democratic Republic of Congo, lying on the Tshuapa
Tshuapa
River east of Boende. Founded by Belgium
Belgium
in the early twentieth century as a trading post, it became an important local centre. It is the headquarters of the Ikela
Ikela
Territory. The town was largely destroyed in the Second Congo War, being for many years under siege from Congolese Rally for Democracy forces. Its population of 15,000 almost all fled, but around half have since returned to reconstruct it. Ikela
Ikela
is served by Ikela
Ikela
Airport.[1] External links[edit]Mines Advisory Group on the Zanga-Zanga group operations in IkelaReferences[edit]^ Airport information for FZGV at Great Circle Mapper.This Democratic Republic of the Congo
Democratic Republic of the Congo
location article is a stub
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Wolf's Mona Monkey
The Wolf's mona monkey
Wolf's mona monkey
( Cercopithecus
Cercopithecus
wolfi), also called Wolf's guenon, is a colourful Old World monkey
Old World monkey
in the family Cercopithecidae. It is found in central Africa, primarily between the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Uganda. It lives in primary and secondary lowland rainforest and swamp forest.Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Physical characteristics 3 Behaviour3.1 Diet and feeding 3.2 Social systems 3.3 Associations4 ReferencesTaxonomy[edit] The species was first described from a living specimen in the Zoological Garden at Dresden. It was brought in 1887 by Dr Ludwig Wolf from somewhere in central west Africa. The species was described in 1891 and named after the collector. This specimen died in October 1891 and the skeletal characters were described in 1894.[3][4] Wolf's mona monkey
Wolf's mona monkey
is in the C
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Thollon's Red Colobus
Thollon's red colobus
Thollon's red colobus
( Procolobus
Procolobus
tholloni), also known as the Tshuapa red colobus,[3] is a species of red colobus monkey from the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Republic of the Congo
and lower Republic of the Congo. It is found south of Congo River
Congo River
and west of Lomami River.[1] It had once been considered a subspecies of the P. badius. It was recognised as a distinct species by Dandelot
Dandelot
in 1974, and this was followed by Groves in 2001, while others have suggested it should be considered a subspecies of P. rufomitratus.[4] References[edit]^ a b Groves, C.P. (2005). Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M., eds. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 170. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. OCLC 62265494.  ^ Hart, J.; Oates, J.F.; Struhsaker, T
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Angolan Kusimanse
The Angolan kusimanse
Angolan kusimanse
( Crossarchus
Crossarchus
ansorgei), also known as Ansorge's kusimanse, is a species of small mongoose. There are two recognized subspecies: C. a. ansorgei, found in Angola; and C. a. nigricolor, found in DR Congo, which do not have overlapping ranges. It prefers rainforest type habitat, and avoids regions inhabited by humans. It grows to 12–18 inches in length, with a 6–10 inch long tail, and weighs 1–3 lb. Little is known about this species of kusimanse, and there are no estimates of its wild population numbers or status. Until 1984, the species was only known from two specimens from Baringa but are now thought to be quite common in some regions. Threats are probably habitat loss and bushmeat hunting. However, this species is protected by Salonga National Park. References[edit]^ Angelici, F. M.; Do Linh San, E. (2015)
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Allen's Swamp Monkey
The Allen's swamp monkey
Allen's swamp monkey
(Allenopithecus nigroviridis) is a primate species categorized in its own genus Allenopithecus in the Old World monkey family. Systematically, it is a sister clade to the guenons, but differs in dentition and habits.Contents1 Range 2 Description 3 Behavior 4 References 5 External linksRange[edit] Allen's swamp monkey
Allen's swamp monkey
lives in the Congo Basin, in the Republic of Congo and in the west of the DRC. It was recorded from Dzanga-Sangha Special
Special
Reserve in the Central African Republic
Central African Republic
in 2016.[3] Description[edit] This monkey is a rather strongly built animal. Its skin is grey-green at the top side. Its face is reddish with long hair bundles at the cheeks. The slight webbing of the fingers and toes point to its partially aquatic way of life
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Okapi
The okapi (/oʊˈkɑːpiː/; Okapia johnstoni), also known as the forest giraffe, congolese giraffe or zebra giraffe, is an artiodactyl mammal native to the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo in Central Africa. Although the okapi bears striped markings reminiscent of zebras, it is most closely related to the giraffe. The okapi and the giraffe are the only living members of the family Giraffidae. The okapi stands about 1.5 m (4.9 ft) tall at the shoulder and has an average body length around 2.5 m (8.2 ft). Its weight ranges from 200 to 350 kg (440 to 770 lb). It has a long neck, and large, flexible ears. Its coat is a chocolate to reddish brown, much in contrast with the white horizontal stripes and rings on the legs and white ankles
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Ecoregion
An ecoregion (ecological region) is an ecologically and geographically defined area that is smaller than a bioregion, which in turn is smaller than an ecozone. All three of these are either less or greater than an ecosystem.[citation needed][clarification needed] Ecoregions cover relatively large areas of land or water, and contain characteristic, geographically distinct assemblages of natural communities and species. The biodiversity of flora, fauna and ecosystems that characterise an ecoregion tends to be distinct from that of other ecoregions. In theory, biodiversity or conservation ecoregions are relatively large areas of land or water where the probability of encountering different species and communities at any given point remains relatively constant, within an acceptable range of variation (largely undefined at this point). Three caveats are appropriate for all bio-geographic mapping approaches. Firstly, no single bio-geographic framework is optimal for all taxa
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Dryas Monkey
The Dryas monkey
Dryas monkey
(Cercopithecus dryas), also known as Salonga monkey or ekele, is a little-known species of guenon found only in the Congo Basin, restricted to the left bank of the Congo River. It is now established that the animals that had been classified as Cercopithecus salongo (the common name being Zaire Diana monkey) were in fact Dryas monkeys.[4] Some older sources treat the Dryas monkey
Dryas monkey
as a subspecies of the Diana monkey
Diana monkey
and classify it as C. diana dryas, but it is geographically isolated from any known Diana monkey
Diana monkey
population. While the Dryas monkey
Dryas monkey
had been considered data deficient, evidence suggests it is very rare and its total population possibly numbers fewer than 200 individuals
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Crested Mangabey
Lophocebus albigena Lophocebus aterrimus Lophocebus opdenboschi Lophocebus ugandae Lophocebus johnstoni Lophocebus osmaniThe crested mangabeys are West-African Old World monkeys belonging to the genus Lophocebus. They tend to have dark skin, eyelids that match their facial skin, and crests of hair on their heads. Another genus of mangabeys, Cercocebus, was once thought to be very closely related, so much so that all the species were placed in one genus. However, it is now understood that Lophocebus species are more closely related to the baboons in genus Papio, while the Cercocebus species are more closely related to the mandrill
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Salonga National Park
Salonga National Park
Salonga National Park
is a national park in the Democratic Republic of the Congo located in the Congo River
Congo River
basin. It is Africa's largest tropical rainforest reserve covering about 36,000 km2 or 3,600,000 hectares (8,900,000 acres). It extends into the provinces of Mai Ndombe, Equateur, Kasaï and Sankuru.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Animals Within the Park 4 References 5 SourcesGeography[edit] The park is in an area of pristine rainforest[citation needed] about halfway between Kinshasa, the capital, and Kisangani. There are no roads and most of the park is accessible only by river[citation needed]. CTT (www.congotravelandtours.com) is the only operator and logistics company currently organizing overwater transport from the Congo River
Congo River
into the Salonga Park via minor rivers
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De Brazza's Monkey
The De Brazza's monkey
De Brazza's monkey
(Cercopithecus neglectus) is an Old World monkey endemic to the wetlands of central Africa. It is one of the most widespread African primates that live in forests.[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 Distribution and habitat 4 Behavior 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] Locally known as swamp monkeys,[3] these primates are named after the Italian-French explorer Pierre Savorgnan de Brazza. Description[edit] This guenon has grey agouti fur with a reddish-brown back, black limbs and tail and a white rump. A white stripe runs down its thigh, and an orange crescent-shaped marking appears on its forehead. Its white eyelids match its muzzle and beard
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Bonobo
The bonobo (/bə.ˈnoʊ.boʊ/ or /ˈbɒ.nə.boʊ/; Pan paniscus), formerly called the pygmy chimpanzee and less often, the dwarf or gracile chimpanzee,[3] is an endangered great ape and one of the two species making up the genus Pan; the other is Pan troglodytes, or the common chimpanzee. Although the name "chimpanzee" is sometimes used to refer to both species together, it is usually understood as referring to the common chimpanzee, whereas Pan paniscus is usually referred to as the bonobo.[4] The bonobo is distinguished by relatively long legs, pink lips, dark face and tail-tuft through adulthood, and parted long hair on its head. The bonobo is found in a 500,000 km2 (190,000 sq mi) area of the Congo Basin
Congo Basin
in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Central Africa. The species is omnivorous and inhabits primary and secondary forests, including seasonally inundated swamp forests
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Forest Elephants
The African forest elephant
African forest elephant
( Loxodonta
Loxodonta
cyclotis) is a forest-dwelling species of elephant found in the Congo Basin. It is the smallest of the three extant species of elephant, but still one of the largest living terrestrial animals. The African forest elephant
African forest elephant
and the African bush elephant, L
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