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Cemil Topuzlu Harbiye Amphitheatre
The Cemil Topuzlu
Cemil Topuzlu
Open-Air Theatre (Turkish: Cemil Topuzlu
Cemil Topuzlu
Harbiye Açık Hava Tiyatrosu, also called simply Açık Hava Tiyatrosu) is a contemporary amphitheatre located at Harbiye neighborhood of Şişli district in Istanbul, Turkey. It is situated across from the Istanbul Lütfi Kırdar Convention and Exhibition Center, and behind the Hilton Istanbul
Istanbul
Bosphorus on the European side of the city. As the city's most popular summertime outdoor venue, the theatre primarily hosts music concerts in various genres of local and international performers
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Loreena McKennitt
Loreena Isabel Irene McKennitt, CM OM (born February 17, 1957) is a Canadian musician, composer, harpist, accordionist, and pianist who writes, records and performs world music with Celtic and Middle Eastern themes. McKennitt is known for her refined and clear dramatic soprano vocals.[1] She has sold more than 14 million records worldwide.[2]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Honours 5 Genre and work 6 Court case 7 2006 and later 8 Documentaries 9 Discography9.1 Studio albums 9.2 Live albums 9.3 EPs 9.4 Compilations 9.5 Boxed sets 9.6 Singles 9.7 Videos 9.8 Other 9.9 Quinlan Road
Quinlan Road
label10 See also 11 References 12 External linksEarly life[edit] McKennitt was born in Morden, Manitoba, of Irish and Scottish descent to parents Jack (died 1992) and Irene McKennitt (1931–2011)
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Harbiye, Şişli
Harbiye is a neighbourhood of Şişli, Istanbul, Turkey.Contents1 Etymology 2 Architecture 3 Gallery 4 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The neighbourhood takes its name from the Mekteb-i Harbiye (Ottoman War Academy) that functioned here for many years, although with intervals, in the 19th and 20th centuries and whose buildings continue to serve as the Military Museum of Istanbul.[1] Architecture[edit] Among other important buildings located in Harbiye are Lycée Notre Dame de Sion Istanbul] from the 19th century building and Istanbul Radio House, Harbiye Muhsin Ertuğrul Stage, Cemal Reşit Rey Concert Hall, Istanbul
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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Sabah (newspaper)
Sabah is a Turkish daily newspaper, with a circulation of around 330,000 as of 2011. Its name means "morning" in Turkish. The newspaper was founded in Izmir by Dinç Bilgin on 22 April 1985.[2] In 2007, the government of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan seized the newspaper, citing a legal document that had not been disclosed to authorities when Sabah was sold in 2001. Ownership of the newspaper was given to the Savings Deposit Insurance Fund of Turkey
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Cemal Reşit Rey Concert Hall
The Cemal Reşit Rey Concert Hall (Turkish: Cemal Reşit Rey Konser Salonu) is a concert hall located in the Harbiye neighbourhood of Istanbul, Turkey. It is one of the country's major concert halls, being the first one designed for classical music. Named after the Turkish composer Cemal Reşit Rey (1904–1985), the hall is owned by the Metropolitan Municipality of Istanbul
Istanbul
and operated by its subsidiary, the Kültür company. Opened in March 1989, it has a seating capacity of 860.[1][2] The concert hall hosts concerts, ballet and dance performances every year between October and May
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Extra (acting)
A background actor or extra is a performer in a film, television show, stage, musical, opera or ballet production, who appears in a nonspeaking or nonsinging (silent) capacity, usually in the background (for example, in an audience or busy street scene). War films and epic films often employ background actors in large numbers: some films have featured hundreds or even thousands of paid background actors as cast members (hence the term "cast of thousands"). Likewise, grand opera can involve many background actors appearing in spectacular productions. On a film or TV set, background actors are usually referred to as "background talent", "background performers", "background artists", "background cast members" or simply "background", while the term "extra" is rarely used. In a stage production, background actors are commonly referred to as "supernumeraries"
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Movie Projector
A movie projector is an opto-mechanical device for displaying motion picture film by projecting it onto a screen
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Box (theatre)
In theater, a box (also known as loge)[1] is a small, separated seating area in the auditorium for a limited number of people. Boxes are typically placed immediately to the front, side and above the level of the stage. They are often separate rooms with an open viewing area which typically seat five people or fewer. Usually all the seats in a box are taken by members of a single group of people. A state box or royal box is sometimes provided for dignitaries. In theaters without box seating the loge can refer to a separate section at the front of the balcony. Sports venues such as stadiums and racetracks also have royal boxes or enclosures, for example at the All England Club
All England Club
and Ascot Racecourse, where access is limited to royal families or other distinguished personalities
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Uzunköprü
Uzunköprü
Uzunköprü
(in English long bridge) is a town in Edirne Province
Edirne Province
in Turkey. It is named after a historical stone bridge, claimed to be the world’s longest, on the Ergene River. It is a strategically important border town, located on the routes connecting Turkey
Turkey
to the Balkans and Europe. Uzunköprü
Uzunköprü
is the largest and the second most populous town of Edirne
Edirne
Province. The town is served by Uzunköprü
Uzunköprü
railway station.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 The Long Bridge, Uzunköprü 4 Other sights4.1 The Monument of Liberty (Liberty Fountain) 4.2 The Mosque of Murad II
Murad II
(Muradiye Mosque) 4.3 The Church of the St
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Limestone
Limestone
Limestone
is a sedimentary rock, composed mainly of skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral, forams and molluscs. Its major materials are the minerals calcite and aragonite, which are different crystal forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). About 10% of sedimentary rocks are limestones. The solubility of limestone in water and weak acid solutions leads to karst landscapes, in which water erodes the limestone over thousands to millions of years
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Facade
A facade (also façade; /fəˈsɑːd/)[1] is generally one exterior side of a building, usually, but not always, the front. It is a foreign loan word from the French façade, which means "frontage" or "face". In architecture, the facade of a building is often the most important aspect from a design standpoint, as it sets the tone for the rest of the building
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Second Constitutional Era
A constitution is a set of fundamental principles or established precedents according to which a state or other organization is governed.[1] These rules together make up, i.e. constitute, what the entity is. When these principles are written down into a single document or set of legal documents, those documents may be said to embody a written constitution; if they are written down in a single comprehensive document, it is said to embody a codified constitution. Some constitutions (such as the constitution of the United Kingdom) are uncodified, but written in numerous fundamental Acts of a legislature, court cases or treaties.[2] Constitutions concern different levels of organizations, from sovereign states to companies and unincorporated associations. A treaty which establishes an international organization is also its constitution, in that it would define how that organization is constituted
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Ottoman Empire
The Ottoman Empire (/ˈɒtəmən/; Devlet-i ʿAlīye-i ʿOsmānīye[dn 5]), also historically known in Western Europe
Europe
as the Turkish Empire[8] or simply Turkey,[9] was a state that controlled much of southeastern Europe, western Asia and northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia
Anatolia
in the town of Söğüt (modern-day Bilecik Province) by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman.[10] After 1354, the Ottomans crossed into Europe, and with the conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman Beylik was transformed into a transcontinental empire
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Turkish State Theatres
The Turkish State Theatres
Turkish State Theatres
(Turkish: Devlet Tiyatroları - DT) is the official directorate of the national theatre companies in Turkey. It is bound to the Ministry of Culture and Tourism and financed by the state to promote performed arts and enhance the public interest they receive
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Tragedy
Tragedy
Tragedy
(from the Greek: τραγῳδία, tragōidia[a]) is a form of drama based on human suffering that invokes an accompanying catharsis or pleasure in audiences.[2][3] While many cultures have developed forms that provoke this paradoxical response, the term tragedy often refers to a specific tradition of drama that has played a unique and important role historically in the self-definition of Western civilisation.[2][4] That tradition has been multiple and discontinuous, yet the term has often been used to invoke a powerful effect of cultural identity and historical continuity—"the Greeks and the Elizabe
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