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Cellach II
Cellach II
Cellach II
is the fourth alleged Bishop of the Scots (fl. mid-10th century), the predecessor of the later St Andrews
St Andrews
bishopric (the bishopric may not actually have been fixed at St Andrews
St Andrews
at this period). He is mentioned in the bishop-lists of the 15th-century historians Walter Bower and Andrew of Wyntoun as the successor of Máel Ísu I, and it is claimed by both sources that he reigned as bishop for twenty-five years after his confirmation at Rome.[1] Bower calls Cellach's father "Ferdlag", and says that Cellach "was the first to go to Rome
Rome
for confirmation".[2] If Cellach's predecessor's (i.e
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Walter Bower
Abbot
Abbot
Walter Bower (or Bowmaker; c. 1385 – 24 December 1449) was a Scottish canon regular of Inchcolm Abbey
Inchcolm Abbey
in the Firth of Forth, who is noted as a chronicler of his era. He was born about 1385 at Haddington, East Lothian, in the Kingdom of Scotland.[1] Life[edit] Bower was trained at the University of St Andrews
University of St Andrews
and became the abbot of the Augustinian community on Inchcolm in 1417.[1] He also acted as one of the commissioners for the collection of the ransom of King James I of Scotland
Scotland
in 1423 and 1424. Later, in 1433, he took part in a diplomatic mission to Paris
Paris
to discuss the possibility of marriage of the king's daughter to the Dauphin of France
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Andrew Of Wyntoun
Andrew Wyntoun, known as Andrew of Wyntoun (c. 1350 – c. 1425), was a Scottish poet, a canon and prior of Loch Leven on St Serf's Inch and later, a canon of St. Andrews. Andrew Wyntoun is most famous for his completion of an eight-syllabled metre entitled, Orygynale Cronykil of Scotland, which contains an early mention of Robin Hood; it is also cited by the Oxford English Dictionary as the earliest work in English to use the word "Catholic": [spelling modernized] "He was a constant Catholic;/All Lollard
Lollard
he hated and heretic." Wyntoun wrote the 'Chronicle' at the request of his patron, Sir John of Wemyss, whose representative, Mr
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Rome
Rome
Rome
(/roʊm/ ROHM; Italian: Roma i[ˈroːma]; Latin: Roma [ˈroːma]) is the capital of Italy
Italy
and a special comune (named Comune
Comune
di Roma Capitale). Rome
Rome
also serves as the capital of the Lazio
Lazio
region. With 2,874,558 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi),[1] it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth-most populous city in the European Union
European Union
by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4.3 million residents.[2] Rome
Rome
is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber
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Chronicle Of The Kings Of Alba
The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba, or Scottish Chronicle, is a short written chronicle of the Kings of Alba, covering the period from the time of Kenneth MacAlpin (Cináed mac Ailpín) (d. 858) until the reign of Kenneth II (Cináed mac Maíl Coluim) (r. 971–995). W.F. Skene called it the Chronicle of the Kings of Scots, and some have called it the Older Scottish Chronicle, but Chronicle of the Kings of Alba
Alba
is emerging as the standard scholarly name. The sole surviving version of the text comes from the Poppleton Manuscript, now in the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris. It is the fourth of seven consecutive Scottish documents in the manuscript, the first six of which were probably put together in the early thirteenth century by the man who wrote de Situ Albanie
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Culen Of Scotland
Cuilén
Cuilén
(also Culén, Cuilean; died 971) was an early King of Alba (Scotland). He was a son of Illulb mac Custantín, King of Alba, after whom he is known by the patronymic mac Illuilb (also mac Iduilb, mac Ilduilb etc.[note 1]) of Clann Áeda meic Cináeda, a branch of the Alpínid dynasty. During the 10th century, the Alpínids rotated the kingship of Alba between two main dynastic branches. Dub mac Maíl Choluim, a member of a rival branch of the kindred, seems to have succeeded after Illulb's death in 962. Cuilén
Cuilén
soon after challenged him but was defeated in 965. Dub was eventually expelled and slain in 966/967. Whether Cuilén
Cuilén
was responsible for his death is uncertain. Following Dub's fall, Cuilén
Cuilén
appears to have ruled as undisputed king from 966–971. Little is known of Cuilén's short reign other than his own death in 971
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Alan Orr Anderson
Alan Orr Anderson (1879–1958) was a Scottish historian and compiler. He graduated from the University of Edinburgh. The son of Rev. John Anderson and Ann Masson, he was born in 1879. He was educated at Royal High School, Edinburgh, and the University of Edinburgh. In 1908, after five years of work sponsored by the Carnegie Trust, he published Scottish Annals
Annals
from English Chroniclers, a reasonably comprehensive compilation of sources about Scottish history
Scottish history
before 1286 written either in England
England
or by chroniclers born in England. Fourteen years later, he was able to publish the 2-volume work entitled Early Sources of Scottish History, A.D. 500 to 1286, a similar but larger collection of sources, this time taken from non-English (mostly Gaelic) material
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Bishop Of St. Andrews
The Bishop
Bishop
of St. Andrews (Scottish Gaelic: Easbaig Chill Rìmhinn, Scots: Beeshop o Saunt Andras) was the ecclesiastical head of the Diocese of St Andrews
Diocese of St Andrews
and then, as Archbishop
Archbishop
of St Andrews
St Andrews
(Scottish Gaelic: Àrd-easbaig Chill Rìmhinn), the Archdiocese of St Andrews. The name St Andrews
St Andrews
is not the town or church's original name. Originally it was Cellrígmonaid ("church of the king's mounth" hence Cill Rìmhinn) located at Cennrígmonaid ("head of the king's mounth"); hence the town became Kilrymont (i.e. Cellrígmonaid) in the non-Gaelic orthography of the High Middle Ages)
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William De Landallis
William de Landallis
William de Landallis
(† 1385) was a 14th-century Bishop of St. Andrews. Life[edit] Like his predecessor, James Bane, he was a native of Aberdeenshire, serving as rector of Kinkell before being appointed by Pope Benedict XII as the successor of James at St. Andrews. The prior and the chapter of the see had actually chosen a man called William Bell, dean of diocese of Dunkeld, but William Bell resigned all rights deriving from the election to the Pope, who did not seek to re-appoint him. According to Walter Bower (vi. 45), William was appointed to the bishopric on 18 February 1342, a date confirmed by a known papal letter. William's long rule as bishop was generally successful. In 1370, he crowned Robert II at Scone.[1] However, it was during William's episcopate that St. Andrews' Cathedral was destroyed by fire
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Robert De Stuteville
Robert de Stuteville
Robert de Stuteville
(died 1283) was Bishop-elect of St Andrews
St Andrews
and Bishop of Dunkeld. Robert was dean of Dunkeld as early as 1253, when he was elected to the bishopric of St Andrews
St Andrews
on 28 June that year. His election was opposed by the king, at the time, Alexander III, and by the bishopric's Céli Dé chapter. The prior and the canons sent Robert to Rome, but a delegation of the king, including Abel de Golynn, was also sent, and the result was that Robert's election was quashed. Robert remained dean in Dunkeld. In 1273, after the death of Bishop Richard de Inverkeithing, Robert was elected to succeed him. In the following year, the Pope commanded the Bishop of Moray, the Bishop of Aberdeen and the Bishop of Glasgow
Bishop of Glasgow
to investigate his election. The investigation was successful and led to his consecration
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Abel De Gullane
Abel de Gullane
Gullane
[Golynn, Golin] was a 13th-century Bishop of St Andrews. He had been archdeacon of the diocese, and subsequently a Papal chaplain. In early 1254, after quashing the election of Robert de Stuteville, the Pope
Pope
provided Abel to the bishopric, a decision not universally popular in Scotland. His first appearance back at St Andrews as bishop was on 29 June 1254, when he is recorded as celebrating the Papal mass. He died only a few months later, on 1 December. References[edit]Dowden, John, The Bishops of Scotland, ed. J. Maitland Thomson, (Glasgow, 1912)Religious titlesPreceded by Robert de Stuteville
Robert de Stuteville
(unconsecrated) David de Bernham
David de Bernham
(consecrated) Bishop of St
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Gamelin (bishop)
Gamelin (died 1271) was a 13th-century Bishop of St Andrews. He had previously been the chancellor to King Alexander III of Scotland, as well as Papal chaplain. He was postulated to the see in Lent, 1255, and confirmed by Pope
Pope
Alexander IV on 1 July 1255, who also agreed to overlook his apparent "defect of birth". Gamelin was a Comyn supporter, and was banished from the kingdom sometime in 1256, a year after the Comyns' rival Alan Durward
Alan Durward
had seized power. After the Durwards were overthrown, he was able to return, and was certainly back in Scotland by 1270. He died the following year at "Inchmurdauch" (Innse Muiredaich).References[edit]Dowden, John, The Bishops of Scotland, ed. J
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William Wishart
William Wishart
William Wishart
(or Wischard) (died 28 May 1279) was a 13th-century Bishop of St. Andrews. He was postulated to the see of St. Andrews (Cell Rígmonaid or Cill Rìmhinn) while holding the position as Bishop-elect of Glasgow, which he resigned when, on 2 June 1271, he was elected to that vacant see. He was succeeded at Glasgow by his cousin (consanguieus), Robert Wishart. His election to St. Andrews
St. Andrews
was notable, because apparently the bishopric's Céli Dé community were excluded from the election. Pope Gregory X
Pope Gregory X
charged the Bishop of Moray, the Bishop of Aberdeen, and the Bishop of Argyll, to look over the character of the elect and to investigate the legitimacy of the election, of the latter of which the Pope had suspicions
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William Fraser (bishop Of St Andrews)
William Fraser (died 1297) was a late 13th century Bishop of St Andrews and Guardian of the Kingdom of Scotland. Before election to the bishopric, he had been and Royal Chancellor of King Alexander III of Scotland and dean of Glasgow. He was elected to the bishopric on 4 August 1279, and confirmed in the position the following year by Pope Nicholas III In 1295, William was sent to France
France
as part of the king's attempt to gain an alliance with the French king, on 20 August 1297. William was one of the leading political figures in the kingdom during the crisis that emerged in the aftermath of King Alexander. In 1290, he was elected as one of the six Guardians of Scotland, the six oligarchs who ran Scotland until the accession of King John Balliol
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William De Lamberton
William de Lamberton, sometimes modernized as William Lamberton, (died 20 May 1328) was Bishop of St Andrews
Bishop of St Andrews
from 1297 (consecrated 1298) until his death. Lamberton is renowned for his influential role during the Scottish Wars of Independence. He campaigned for the national cause under William Wallace
William Wallace
and later Robert the Bruce. Bishop Lamberton was present at the coronation of Robert the Bruce
Robert the Bruce
as King Robert I conducted by Bishop Robert Wishart
Robert Wishart
of Glasgow
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James Bane
James Bane
James Bane
(or Ben) (died 1332) was Bishop of St. Andrews
Bishop of St. Andrews
for a brief period in the early 14th century. In his earlier career, James had been a canon of Aberdeen and prebendary of Cruden. James rose to the position of Archdeacon
Archdeacon
of St. Andrews, one of the most senior positions within the diocese. He was appointed one of the ambassadors to France along with Thomas Randolph, 1st Earl of Moray, Robert Keith the Marischal of Scotland, Adam de Moravia and Walter de Twynham in 1326 to renew the Auld Alliance
Auld Alliance
with the signing of the Treaty of Corbeil (1326).[1] Ten days after the death of Bishop William de Lamberton
William de Lamberton
in 1328, the chapter held an election to fill the vacancy
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