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Cattell–Horn–Carroll Theory
The Cattell–Horn–Carroll theory, (commonly abbreviated to CHC), is a prominent psychological theory on the structure of human cognitive abilities. Based on the work of three psychologists, Raymond B. Cattell, John L. Horn and John B. Carroll, the Cattell–Horn–Carroll theory
Cattell–Horn–Carroll theory
is widely regarded as the most influential theory in the study of human intelligence. Based on a large body of research, spanning over 70 years, the theory was developed using the psychometric approach, the objective measurement of individual differences in abilities, and the application of factor analysis, a statistical technique which uncovers relationships between variables and the underlying structure of concepts such as 'intelligence' (Keith & Reynolds, 2010)
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Raymond Cattell
Raymond Bernard Cattell (20 March 1905 – 2 February 1998) was a British and American psychologist, known for his psychometric research into intrapersonal psychological structure.[1][2] His work also explored the basic dimensions of personality and temperament, the range of cognitive abilities, the dynamic dimensions of motivation and emotion, the clinical dimensions of abnormal personality, patterns of group syntality and social behavior,[3] applications of personality research to psychotherapy and learning theory,[4] predictors of creativity and achievement,[5] and many multivariate research methods[6] including the refinement of factor analytic methods for exploring and measuring these domains.[7][8] Cattell authored, co-authored, or edited almost 60 scholarly books, more than 500 research articles, and over 30 standardized psychometric tests, questionnaires, and rating scales.[9][10] According to a widely cited ranking, Cattell was the 16th most eminent,[11] 7th most cited in the
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Cross Battery Assessment
Cross-battery assessment refers to the process by which psychologists use information from multiple test batteries (i.e., various IQ tests) to help guide diagnostic decisions and to gain a fuller picture of an individual’s cognitive abilities than can be ascertained through the use of single-battery assessments. The cross-battery approach (XBA) was first introduced in the late 1990s[1] by Dawn Flanagan, Samuel Ortiz and Kevin McGrew
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Outline Of Thought
Outline may refer to: Outline (list), a document summary, in hierarchical list format Outline (software), a note-taking application Outline drawing, a sketch depicting the outer edges of a person or object, without interior details or shading Outline typeface, in typography The
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Social Intelligence
Social intelligence, the capacity to know oneself and to know others, is as inalienable a part of the human condition as is the capacity to know objects or sounds, and it deserves to be investigated no less than these other "less charged" forms.[1] Social scientist
Social scientist
Ross Honeywill believes social intelligence is an aggregated measure of self- and social-awareness, evolved social beliefs and attitudes, and a capacity and appetite to manage complex social change.[2] Psychologist,
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University Of Illinois Press
The University of Illinois Press (UIP) is a major American university press and is part of the University of Illinois system. Founded in 1918, the press publishes some 120 new books each year, plus 33 scholarly journals, and several electronic projects. Strengths include ethnic and multicultural studies, Lincoln and Illinois history, and the large and diverse series Music in American Life.[3] See also[edit]Journals published by University of Illinois PressReferences[edit]^ "Publishers served by the Chicago Distribution Center". University of Chicago Press. Retrieved 2017-09-12.  ^ "UI Press International Sales Representation". Retrieved 2017-12-02.  ^ Jason Boog (3 June 2009). "Illinois UP Receives Lifetime Achievement Award". Mediabistro.com. Archived from the original on 5 September 2012
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William H. Tucker
William H. Tucker is an American psychologist. He is professor of psychology at Rutgers University
Rutgers University
and the author of several books critical of race science.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Publications 4 References 5 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Tucker received his bachelor's degree from Bates College
Bates College
in 1967, and his master's and doctorate from Princeton University. He joined the faculty at Rutgers University
Rutgers University
in 1970 and has been there since.[1] Career[edit] Tucker was a Psychometric Fellow for three years at Princeton, a position subsidized by Educational Testing Service. The majority of Tucker's scholarship has been about psychometrics, not in it
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Alan S. Kaufman
Alan S. Kaufman (born April 1944) is an American psychology professor known for his work on intelligence testing.Contents1 Early life and career 2 Development of Kaufman IQ scales 3 Overview of Kaufman's tests 4 Influence on other researchers 5 Publications 6 Children 7 References 8 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Born in Brooklyn
Brooklyn
and raised on Long Island, Kaufman earned his bachelor's degree from the University of Pennsylvania
University of Pennsylvania
in 1965; M.A. in Educational Psychology
Psychology
from Columbia University
Columbia University
in 1967; and Ph.D. from Columbia University
Columbia University
in 1970 (under Robert L. Thorndike), specializing in psychometrics. He has been married to psychologist Nadeen L
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Spatial Visualization Ability
Spatial visualization ability or visual-spatial ability is the ability to mentally manipulate 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional figures. It is typically measured with simple cognitive tests and is predictive of user performance with some kinds of user interfaces.Contents1 Measurement 2 Gender differences 3 Age differences 4 History 5 See also 6 References6.1 Inline citations 6.2 General references7 External linksMeasurement[edit] The cognitive tests used to measure spatial visualization ability including mental rotation tasks like the Mental Rotations Test or mental cutting tasks like the Mental Cutting Test; and cognitive tests like the VZ-1 (Form Board), VZ-2 (Paper Folding), and VZ-3 (Surface Development) tests from the Kit of Factor-Reference cognitive tests produced by Educational Testing Service
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School Psychology
School psychology
School psychology
is a field that applies principles of educational psychology, developmental psychology, clinical psychology, community psychology, and applied behavior analysis to meet children's and adolescents' behavioral health and learning needs in a collaborative manner with educators and parents. School psychologists are educated in psychology, child and adolescent development, child and adolescent psychopathology, education, family and parenting practices, learning theories, and personality theories. They are knowledgeable about effective instruction and effective schools
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Charles Spearman
Charles Edward Spearman, FRS[1][2] (10 September 1863 – 17 September 1945) was an English psychologist known for work in statistics, as a pioneer of factor analysis, and for Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. He also did seminal work on models for human intelligence, including his theory that disparate cognitive test scores reflect a single General intelligence factor[3] and coining the term g factor.[4]Contents1 Biography 2 Theory of intelligence 3 Factor analysis 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksBiography[edit] Spearman had an unusual background for a psychologist. In his childhood he was ambitious to follow an academic career. He first joined the army as a regular officer of engineers in August 1883,[5] and was promoted to captain on 8 July 1893, serving in the Munster Fusiliers.[6] After 15 years he resigned in 1897 to study for a PhD in experimental psychology
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Factor Analysis
Factor analysis
Factor analysis
is a statistical method used to describe variability among observed, correlated variables in terms of a potentially lower number of unobserved variables called factors. For example, it is possible that variations in six observed variables mainly reflect the variations in two unobserved (underlying) variables. Factor analysis searches for such joint variations in response to unobserved latent variables. The observed variables are modelled as linear combinations of the potential factors, plus "error" terms. Factor analysis
Factor analysis
aims to find independent latent variables. The theory behind factor analytic methods is that the information gained about the interdependencies between observed variables can be used later to reduce the set of variables in a dataset
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Reason
Reason
Reason
is the capacity for consciously making sense of things, establishing and verifying facts, applying logic, and changing or justifying practices, institutions, and beliefs based on new or existing information.[1] It is closely associated with such characteristically human activities as philosophy, science, language, mathematics, and art and is normally considered to be a distinguishing ability possessed by humans.[2] Reason, or an aspect of it, is sometimes referred to as rationality. Reasoning is associated with thinking, cognition, and intellect. The philosophical field of logic studies ways in which humans reason formally through argument.[3] Reasoning may be subdivided into forms of logical reasoning (forms associated with the strict sense): deductive reasoning, inductive reasoning, abductive reasoning; and other modes of reasoning considered more informal, such as intuitive reasoning and verbal reasoning
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Thought
Thought
Thought
refers to ideas or arrangements of ideas that are the result of the process of thinking. Though thinking is an activity considered essential to humanity, there is no consensus as to how it is defined or understood. Because thought underlies many human actions and interactions, understanding its physical and metaphysical origins, processes, and effects has been a longstanding goal of many academic disciplines including linguistics, psychology, neuroscience, philosophy, artificial intelligence, biology, sociology and cognitive science. Thinking allows humans to make sense or, interpret, represent or model the world they experience, and to make predictions about that world. It is therefore helpful to an organism with needs, objectives, and desires as it makes plans or otherwise attempts to accomplish those goals.Contents1 Etymology and usage 2 Theories 3 Philosophy3.1 Mind–body dichotomy 3.2 Functionalism vs
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