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Catte Street
Coordinates: 51°45′15″N 1°15′14″W / 51.7543°N 1.2540°W / 51.7543; -1.2540Looking south along Catte Street
Catte Street
towards St Mary's Church.Catte Street, from outside the Bodleian Library, looking north towards Parks Road. Catte Street
Catte Street
is a historic street in central Oxford, England.[1][2]Contents1 Location 2 History 3 Cultural associations 4 Gallery 5 References 6 External linksLocation[edit] Catte Street
Catte Street
runs north-south, continuing as Parks Road
Parks Road
to the north (beyond a junction with Broad Street and Holywell Street)
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Jazz Band
A jazz band (jazz ensemble or jazz combo) is a musical ensemble that plays jazz music. Jazz
Jazz
bands vary in the quantity of its members and the style of jazz that they play but it is common to find a jazz band made up of a rhythm section and a horn section. The size of a jazz band is closely related to the style of jazz they play as well as the type of venues in which they play. Smaller jazz bands, also known as combos, are common in night clubs and other small venues and will be made up of three to seven musicians; whereas big bands are found in dance halls and other larger venues.[1] Jazz
Jazz
bands can vary in size from a big band, to a smaller trio or quartet. The term jazz trio can refer to a three piece band with a pianist, double bass player and a drummer. Some bands use vocalists, while others are purely instrumental groups. Jazz
Jazz
bands usually have a bandleader
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All Souls College
All Souls College (official name: College of the souls of all the faithful departed [2]) is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England. Unique to All Souls, all of its members automatically become Fellows (i.e. full members of the College's governing body)
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Nikolaus Pevsner
Sir Nikolaus Bernhard Leon Pevsner CBE
CBE
FBA (30 January 1902 – 18 August 1983) was a German, later British scholar of the history of art, and especially that of architecture. Pevsner is best known for his 46-volume series of county-by-county guides, The Buildings of England (1951–74), often simply referred to by his surname.Contents1 Life 2 Second World War 3 Postwar 4 Death 5 Notable ideas and theories 6 Archive 7 Publications 8 Note and references 9 Further reading9.1 Papers10 External linksLife[edit] The son of a Russian-Jewish fur haulier, Nikolaus Pevsner
Nikolaus Pevsner
was born in Leipzig, Saxony
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The Buildings Of England
The Pevsner Architectural Guides are a series of guide books to the architecture of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland. Begun in the 1940s by the art historian Sir Nikolaus Pevsner, the 46 volumes of the original Buildings of England series were published between 1951 and 1974. The series was then extended to Scotland, Wales
Wales
and Ireland
Ireland
in the late 1970s. The Irish guides are incomplete as of autumn 2016
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Penguin Books
Peter Field, CEO Madeline McIntosh, President USAPublication types BooksImprints Penguin Classics, Viking PressOwner(s) Bertelsmann, Pearson PLCOfficial website www.penguin.comPenguin Crime (details) Penguin Books
Penguin Books
is a British publishing house. It was co-founded in 1935 by Sir Allen Lane, his brothers Richard and John[2], as a line of the publishers The Bodley Head, only becoming a separate company the following year[3]. Penguin revolutionised publishing in the 1930s through its inexpensive paperbacks, sold through Woolworths and other high street stores for sixpence, bringing high-quality paperback fiction and non-fiction to the mass market.[4] Penguin's success demonstrated that large audiences existed for serious books
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Christopher Hibbert
Christopher Hibbert (born Arthur Raymond Hibbert) MC (5 March 1924 – 21 December 2008), was an English author, historian and biographer. He has been called "a pearl of biographers" (New Statesman) and "probably the most widely-read popular historian of our time and undoubtedly one of the most prolific" (The Times).[1] Hibbert was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature
Royal Society of Literature
and the author of many books, including The Story of England, Disraeli, Edward VII, George IV, The Rise and Fall of the House of Medici, and Cavaliers and Roundheads.Contents1 Biography 2 Personal life 3 Works 4 References 5 Further readingBiography[edit] In 1924 Arthur Raymond Hibbert was born in Enderby, Leicestershire, the son of Canon H. V. Hibbert (died 1980) and his wife Maude
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His Dark Materials
His Dark Materials
His Dark Materials
is an epic trilogy of fantasy novels by Philip Pullman consisting of Northern Lights (1995), published as The Golden Compass
Compass
in North America), The Subtle Knife
The Subtle Knife
(1997), and The Amber Spyglass (2000). It follows the coming of age of two children, Lyra Belacqua and Will Parry, as they wander through a series of parallel universes. The novels have won a number of awards, including the Carnegie Medal in 1995 for Northern Lights and the 2001 Whitbread Book of the Year for The Amber
Amber
Spyglass. His Dark Materials
His Dark Materials
has been marketed to young adults, though Pullman wrote with no target audience in mind. The fantasy elements include witches and armoured polar bears; the trilogy also alludes to concepts from physics, philosophy and theology
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The Encyclopaedia Of Oxford
The Encyclopaedia
Encyclopaedia
of Oxford
Oxford
is an encyclopaedia covering the history of the university city of Oxford
Oxford
in England. The book was published by Macmillan in 1988 (ISBN 0-333-39917-X). It was edited by the Oxford-educated historian Christopher Hibbert with the help of the associate editor, his brother Edward Hibbert. The encyclopaedia was published in hardback and then a paperback version (Papermac, reissued in 1992, ISBN 0-333-48614-5), but only one edition was produced and copies are now sought, typically selling for more than the original selling price of £25 for the hardback edition, even in paperback form.[1][2] The book mainly consists of detailed historical entries in alphabetical order. Many entries concern the University of Oxford
Oxford
and its colleges
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Macmillan Publishers
Macmillan Publishers
Macmillan Publishers
Ltd (occasionally known as the Macmillan Group) is an international publishing company owned by Holtzbrinck Publishing Group. It has offices in 41 countries worldwide and operates in more than thirty others.Contents1 History1.1 Macmillan in the United States 1.2 E-books
E-books
and price fixing charges 1.3 Corruption charges2 Divisions 3 See also 4 Notes and references 5 Further reading 6 External linksHistory[edit]This logo appeared in Leslie Stephen's biography of Alexander Pope, published by Macmillan & Co in 1880.Macmillan was founded in 1843 by Daniel and Alexander Macmillan, two brothers from the Isle of Arran, Scotland
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Michael Camille
Michael Camille (1958–2002), Mary L. Block Professor at the University of Chicago, was an art historian specialized in the European Middle Ages. Life[edit] Michael Camille was born in Keighley, Yorkshire, on 6 March 1958.[1] He studied English and Art History at Peterhouse, Cambridge, graduating with a first class honours degree in 1980 and with a PhD in 1985.[2] Immediately after obtaining his doctorate he began work at the University of Chicago, where he remained for the rest of his short career. He was best known for applying post-structuralist ideas to questions of medieval art history
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Rough Guides
Rough Guides Ltd is a British travel guidebook and reference publisher, since November 2017 owned by APA Publications. Its travel titles cover more than 200 destinations. The series began with the 1982 Rough Guide to Greece,[1] a book conceived by Mark Ellingham, who was dissatisfied with the polarisation of existing guidebooks between cost-obsessed student guides and "heavyweight cultural tomes". Initially, the series was aimed at low-budget backpackers. The Rough Guides books have incorporated more expensive recommendations since the early 1990s, and books have had colour printing since the late 1990s, which are now marketed to travellers on all budgets
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