HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Cataphatic Theology
Cataphatic theology
Cataphatic theology
or kataphatic theology is theology that uses "positive" terminology to describe or refer to the divine – specifically, God – i.e. terminology that describes or refers to what the divine is believed to be, in contrast to the "negative" terminology used in apophatic theology to indicate what it is believed the divine is not.Contents1 Etymology 2 Terminology 3 Eastern Orthodoxy 4 Roman Catholicism 5 Cataphatic treatment of ultimate reality in Buddhism 6 In Gaudiya-vaishnavism 7 See also 8 Notes 9 BibliographyEtymology[edit] "Cataphatic" comes from the Greek word κατάφασις kataphasis meaning "affirmation,"[1] coming from κατά kata (an intensifier)[2] and φάναι phanai ("to speak"). Terminology[edit] To speak of God
God
or the divine kataphatically is thought by some to be by its nature a form of limiting to God
God
or divine
[...More...]

"Cataphatic Theology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Philosophy Of Religion
Philosophy
Philosophy
of religion is "the philosophical examination of the central themes and concepts involved in religious traditions."[1] These sorts of philosophical discussion are ancient, and can be found in the earliest known manuscripts concerning philosophy. The field is related to many other branches of philosophy, including metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics.[2] The philosophy of religion differs from religious philosophy in that it seeks to discuss questions regarding the nature of religion as a whole, rather than examining the problems brought forth by a particular belief system
[...More...]

"Philosophy Of Religion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Personal God
A personal god is a deity who can be related to as a person[1] instead of as an impersonal force, such as the Absolute, "the All", or the "Ground of Being". In the scriptures of the Abrahamic religions, God
God
is described as being a personal creator, speaking in the first person and showing emotion such as anger and pride, and sometimes appearing in anthropomorphic shape.[2] In the Pentateuch, for example, God
God
talks with and instructs his prophets and is conceived as possessing volition, emotions (such as anger, grief and happiness), intention, and other attributes characteristic of a human person
[...More...]

"Personal God" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Natural Evil
Natural evil
Natural evil
is evil for which “no non-divine agent can be held morally responsible for its occurrence.”[1] By contrast, moral evil is “caused by human activity.”[2] The existence of natural evil challenges belief in the omnibenevolence or the omnipotence of deities and the existence of deities including God.[3]Contents1 Nature of natural evil 2 Natural versus moral evil 3 Challenge to religious belief 4 ReferencesNature of natural evil[edit] Moral evil results from a perpetrator, or one who acts intentionally and in so doing has flouted some duty or engaged in some vice. Natural evil has only victims, and is generally taken to be the result of natural processes
[...More...]

"Natural Evil" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

God
In monotheistic thought, God
God
is conceived of as the Supreme Being
Supreme Being
and the principal object of faith.[3] The concept of God, as described by theologians, commonly includes the attributes of omniscience (all-knowing), omnipotence (unlimited power), omnipresence (present everywhere), divine simplicity, and as having an eternal and necessary existence. In agnostic thought, the existence of God
God
is unknown and/or unknowable
[...More...]

"God" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Conceptions Of God
Conceptions of God
God
in monotheist, pantheist, and panentheist religions – or of the supreme deity in henotheistic religions – can extend to various levels of abstraction:as a powerful, human-like, supernatural being, or as the deification of an esoteric, mystical or philosophical entity or category; as the "Ultimate", the summum bonum, the "Absolute Infinite", the "Transcendent", or Existence or Being
Being
itself; as the ground of being, the monistic substrate, that which we cannot understand; and so on.The first recordings that survive of monotheistic conceptions of God, borne out of henotheism and (mostly in Eastern religions) monism, are from the Hellenistic period
[...More...]

"Conceptions Of God" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aristotelian View Of God
Aristotelian theology
Aristotelian theology
and the scholastic view of God
God
have been influential in Western intellectual history.Contents1 Metaphysics 2 Principles of being 3 Influence 4 See also 5 ReferencesMetaphysics[edit] Main articles: Metaphysics (Aristotle)
Metaphysics (Aristotle)
and Unmoved movers In his first philosophy, later called the Metaphysics, (or “after the Physics”), Aristotle
Aristotle
discusses the meaning of being as being. He refers to the unmoved movers (hyperagents), and assigns one to each movement in the heavens and tasks future astronomers with correlating the estimated 47 to 55 motions of the Eudoxan planetary model with the most current and accurate observations
[...More...]

"Aristotelian View Of God" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Brahman
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-DussehraRaksha Bandhan Ganesh Chat
[...More...]

"Brahman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Demiurge
In the Platonic, Neopythagorean, Middle Platonic, and Neoplatonic schools of philosophy, the demiurge (/ˈdɛmiˌɜːrdʒ/) is an artisan-like figure responsible for fashioning and maintaining the physical universe. The term was adopted by the Gnostics. Although a fashioner, the demiurge is not necessarily the same as the creator figure in the monotheistic sense, because the demiurge itself and the material from which the demiurge fashions the universe are both considered to be consequences of something else. Depending on the system, they may be considered to be either uncreated and eternal, or considered to be the product of some other entity. The word "demiurge" is an English word from demiurgus, a Latinized form of the Greek δημιουργός or dēmiourgos
[...More...]

"Demiurge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Divine Simplicity
In theology, the doctrine of divine simplicity says that God
God
is without parts. The general idea of divine simplicity can be stated in this way: the being of God
God
is identical to the "attributes" of God. In other words, such characteristics as omnipresence, goodness, truth, eternity, etc. are identical to God's being, not qualities that make up that being, nor abstract entities inhering in God
God
as in a substance
[...More...]

"Divine Simplicity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Holy Spirit
Holy Spirit
Spirit
or Holy Ghost is a term found in English translations of the Bible that is understood differently among the Abrahamic religions.[1][2] The term is also used to describe aspects of other religions and belief structures.Contents1 Etymology 2 Comparative religion 3 Abrahamic religions3.1 Judaism 3.2 Christianity 3.3 Islam4 Other religions4.1 Bahá'í Faith 4.2 In Hinduism 4.3 Buddhism 4.4 Sikhism5 See also 6 References6.1 Works citedEtymology[edit] The word "Spirit" (from the Latin spiritus meaning "breath") appears as either alone or with other words, in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
(Old Testament) and the New Testament
[...More...]

"Holy Spirit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Maltheism
Misotheism is the "hatred of God" or "hatred of the gods" (from the Greek adjective μισόθεος "hating the gods", a compound of μῖσος "hatred" and θεός "god"). In some varieties of polytheism, it was considered possible to inflict punishment on gods by ceasing to worship them.[citation needed] Thus, Hrafnkell, protagonist of the eponymous Hrafnkels saga
Hrafnkels saga
set in the 10th century, as his temple to Freyr
Freyr
is burnt and he is enslaved, states that "I think it is folly to have faith in gods", never performing another blót (sacrifice), a position described in the sagas as goðlauss, "godless". Jacob Grimm
Jacob Grimm
in his Teutonic Mythology observes that:It is remarkable that Old Norse legend occasionally mentions certain men who, turning away in utter disgust and doubt from the heathen faith, placed their reliance on their own strength and virtue
[...More...]

"Maltheism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pandeism
Pandeism
Pandeism
(or pan-deism) is a theological doctrine first delineated in the 18th century which combines aspects of pantheism with aspects of deism.[1] It holds that the creator deity became the universe (pantheism) and ceased to exist as a separate and conscious entity (deism holding that God
God
does not interfere with the universe after its creation).[2][3][4][5] Pandeism
Pandeism
is proposed to explain, as it relates to deism, why God
God
would create a universe and then abandon it,[6] and as to pantheism, the origin and purpose of the universe.[6][7] The word pandeism is a hybrid blend of the root words pantheism and deism, combining Ancient Greek: πᾶν, translit. pan, lit. 'all' with Latin: deus which means "god"
[...More...]

"Pandeism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Process Theology
Process theology is a type of theology developed from Alfred North Whitehead's (1861–1947) process philosophy, most notably by Charles Hartshorne (1897–2000) and John B. Cobb
John B. Cobb
(b. 1925)
[...More...]

"Process Theology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Best Of All Possible Worlds
The phrase "the best of all possible worlds" (French: le meilleur des mondes possibles; German: Die beste aller möglichen Welten) was coined by the German polymath Gottfried Leibniz
Gottfried Leibniz
in his 1710 work Essais de Théodicée
Théodicée
sur la bonté de Dieu, la liberté de l'homme et l'origine du mal (Essays on the Goodness of God, the Freedom of Man and the Origin of Evil)
[...More...]

"Best Of All Possible Worlds" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Supreme Being
Supreme Being
Supreme Being
is a term used by theologians and philosophers of many religions, including Christianity, Islam,[1] Hinduism,[2] Judaism, Sikhism, Jainism, Deism[3] and Zoroastrianism
[...More...]

"Supreme Being" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.