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Castleton University
Castleton University, formerly known as Castleton State College, is a public liberal arts college, located in Castleton in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Vermont. Castleton has an enrollment of 2000 students and offers more than 30 undergraduate programs, as well as master's degrees in education and accounting
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Soccer
Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer,[a] is a team sport played between two teams of eleven players with a spherical ball. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport.[3][4][5][6] The game is played on a rectangular field with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal. Players are not allowed to touch the ball with outstretched hands or arms while it is in play, unless they are goalkeepers within their penalty area. Other players mainly use their feet to strike or pass the ball, but may also use any other part of their body except the hands and the arms. The team that scores the most goals by the end of the match wins. If the score is level at the end of the game, either a draw is declared or the game goes into extra time or a penalty shootout depending on the format of the competition
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National Education Association
The National Education Association
National Education Association
(NEA) is the largest professional interest group in the United States.[2] It represents public school teachers and other support personnel, faculty and staffers at colleges and universities, retired educators, and college students preparing to become teachers. The NEA has just under 3 million members and is headquartered in Washington, D.C.[3] The NEA had a budget of more than $341 million for the 2012–2013 fiscal year.[4] Lily Eskelsen García is the NEA's current president.[5] The stated mission of the NEA is "to advocate for education professionals and to unite our members and the nation to fulfill the promise of public education to prepare every student to succeed in a diverse and interdependent world."[6] The NEA, originally on the conservative side of U.S
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New England
New England
New England
is a geographical region comprising six states of the northeastern United States: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.[a] It is bordered by the state of New York to the west and by the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Quebec
Quebec
to the northeast and north, respectively. The Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
is to the east and southeast, and Long Island Sound
Long Island Sound
is to the south. Boston
Boston
is New England's largest city as well as the capital of Massachusetts
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Mount Holyoke Female Seminary
Mount Holyoke
Mount Holyoke
College is a liberal arts college for women in South Hadley, Massachusetts, United States. It was the first member of the Seven Sisters colleges, and it served as a model for some of the others. Mount Holyoke
Mount Holyoke
is part of the region's Five College Consortium, along with Amherst College, Smith College, Hampshire College, and the University of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Amherst. The school was founded in 1837 by Mary Lyon
Mary Lyon
as Mount Holyoke
Mount Holyoke
Female Seminary. Mount Holyoke
Mount Holyoke
received its collegiate charter in 1888 as Mount Holyoke
Mount Holyoke
Seminary and College and became Mount Holyoke
Mount Holyoke
College in 1893. Mount Holyoke's buildings were designed between 1896 and 1960
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Godfrey, Illinois
Godfrey is a village in Madison County, Illinois, United States. The population was 17,982 at the 2010 census.[3] Godfrey is located within the Greater St. Louis
Greater St. Louis
metropolitan area.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Demographics 4 Notable people 5 References 6 External linksGeography[edit] Godfrey is located at 38°56′53″N 90°12′10″W / 38.94806°N 90.20278°W / 38.94806; -90.20278 (38.948097, -90.202886).[4] According to the 2010 census, Godfrey has a total area of 36.638 square miles (94.89 km2), of which 34.64 square miles (89.72 km2) (or 94.55%) is land and 1.998 square miles (5.17 km2) (or 5.45%) is water.[5] The southwestern boundary of the village is a wall of limestone bluffs along the Mississippi River. Approximately 12 miles (19 km) upstream is the mouth of the Illinois
Illinois
River
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Normal Schools
A normal school was a school created to train high school graduates to be teachers by educating them in the norms of pedagogy and curriculum. Most such schools, where they still exist, are now denominated "teachers' colleges". According to the Oxford English Dictionary, normal schools in the United States
United States
and Canada
Canada
trained teachers for primary schools, while in continental Europe
Europe
normal schools educated teachers for primary, secondary and tertiary schools.[1] In 1685, St. Jean-Baptiste de La Salle, founder of the Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools, founded what is generally considered the first normal school, the École Normale, in Reims, Champagne, France. The term "normal" herein refers to the goal of these institutions to instill and reinforce particular norms within students
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Caroline Woodruff
Caroline Woodruff is an English voice-over artist and actor based in Stockport. She is a professional broadcaster and trained with the BBC in London
London
going on to present music and arts programmes for BBC
BBC
Radio Leeds, BBC
BBC
GMR, and BBC
BBC
Radio Manchester where she met presenter and producer Jeff Cooper, Editor of radio2XS. In 2008 Woodruff began broadcasting with Radio2XS. Woodruff's credits include the television crime drama A Touch of Frost, Dangerfield and the soap operas Emmerdale
Emmerdale
and Coronation Street. As a stage actor Woodruff has worked with numerous theatre companies including Sheffield Crucible
Sheffield Crucible
and Oxfordshire Theatre Company [1]. External links[edit] Caroline Woodruff on IMDbThis article about an English actor or actress is a stub
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John Dewey
John Dewey
John Dewey
(/ˈduːi/; October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, Georgist, and educational reformer whose ideas have been influential in education and social reform. Dewey is one of the primary figures associated with the philosophy of pragmatism and is considered one of the fathers of functional psychology. A Review of General Psychology survey, published in 2002, ranked Dewey as the 93rd most cited psychologist of the 20th century.[2] A well-known public intellectual, he was also a major voice of progressive education and liberalism.[3][4] Although Dewey is known best for his publications about education, he also wrote about many other topics, including epistemology, metaphysics, aesthetics, art, logic, social theory, and ethics
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Helen Keller
Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. She was the first deaf-blind person to earn a bachelor of arts degree. The story of how Keller's teacher, Anne Sullivan, broke through the isolation imposed by a near complete lack of language, allowing the girl to blossom as she learned to communicate, has become widely known through the dramatic depictions of the play and film The Miracle Worker. Her birthplace in West Tuscumbia, Alabama, is now a museum[1] and sponsors an annual " Helen Keller
Helen Keller
Day". Her birthday on June 27 is commemorated as Helen Keller Day in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and was authorized at the federal level by presidential proclamation by President Jimmy Carter in 1980, the 100th anniversary of her birth. A prolific author, Keller was well-traveled and outspoken in her convictions
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Robert Frost
Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. His work was initially published in England before it was published in America. Known for his realistic depictions of rural life and his command of American colloquial speech,[2] Frost frequently wrote about settings from rural life in New England
New England
in the early twentieth century, using them to examine complex social and philosophical themes. Frost was honored frequently during his lifetime, receiving four Pulitzer Prizes
Pulitzer Prizes
for Poetry. He became one of America's rare "public literary figures, almost an artistic institution."[3] He was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal
Congressional Gold Medal
in 1960 for his poetic works
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Norman Rockwell
Norman Percevel Rockwell (February 3, 1894 – November 8, 1978) was a 20th-century American author, painter and illustrator. His works have a broad popular appeal in the United States for their reflection of American culture. Rockwell is most famous for the cover illustrations of everyday life he created for The Saturday Evening Post
The Saturday Evening Post
magazine over nearly five decades.[1] Among the best-known of Rockwell's works are the Willie Gillis
Willie Gillis
series, Rosie the Riveter, The Problem We All Live With, Saying Grace, and the Four Freedoms
Four Freedoms
series. He also is noted for his 64-year relationship with the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), during which he produced covers for their publication Boys' Life, calendars, and other illustrations
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Green Mountain Power
With more than $7 billion in assets,[1] Énergir, formerly known as Gaz Métro, is a diversified energy company with 520,000 customers. It is the largest natural gas distribution company in Quebec, and also produces, through its subsidiaries, electricity from wind power
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Solomon Foot
Solomon Foot
Solomon Foot
(November 19, 1802 – March 28, 1866) was a Vermont politician and attorney. He held a variety of offices during his career, including Speaker of the Vermont
Vermont
House of Representatives, State's Attorney for Rutland County, member of the United States House of Representatives, and United States Senator. A native of Cornwall, Vermont, Foot began working on local farms at age nine, helping support his family after the death of his father. After graduating from Middlebury College, Foot worked as a teacher, school principal, and college professor while studying law. After attaining admission to the bar in 1831, Foot opened a practice in Rutland. Entering politics as a Whig, Foot served in several offices, including member of the Vermont
Vermont
House of Representatives, delegate to the state constitutional conventions of 1833 and 1836, and Rutland County State's Attorney
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Jim Jeffords
James Merrill Jeffords (May 11, 1934 – August 18, 2014) was a U.S. Senator from Vermont. Sworn into the Senate in 1989, he served as a Republican until 2001, when he left the party to become an Independent and began caucusing with the Democrats. Jeffords retired from the Senate in 2007. Prior to the Senate, he served as the U.S. Representative for Vermont's at-large congressional district
Vermont's at-large congressional district
from 1975 to 1989. The son of Olin M. Jeffords, who served as Chief Justice of the Vermont
Vermont
Supreme Court, James Jeffords was born in Rutland, Vermont. He graduated from Yale University, served for three years in the United States Navy, and then attended Harvard Law School, from which he received his degree in 1962
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National Institutes Of Health
The National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
(NIH) is the primary agency of the United States government
United States government
responsible for biomedical and public health research, founded in the late 1870s. It is part of the United States Department of Health and Human Services with facilities mainly located in Bethesda, Maryland
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