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Castle Of Racconigi
The Royal Castle of Racconigi
Racconigi
is a palace and landscape park in Racconigi, province of Cuneo, Italy. It was the official residence of the Carignano line of the House of Savoy, and is one of the Residences of the Royal House of Savoy
House of Savoy
included by UNESCO
UNESCO
in the World Heritage Sites list.Contents1 History1.1 Architecture 1.2 Landscape park2 See also 3 External linksHistory[edit] The first records of the castle are from around the year 1000, when Bernardino of Susa rebuilt an ancient manor, leaving it to Cistercian monks. The castle was a possession of the margraves of Saluzzo and others starting in the 13th century, and in the 16th century was acquired by the House of Savoy. In 1630, Duke Charles Emmanuel I granted it to his nephew Thomas Francis, Prince of Carignano, founder of the Savoy-Carignano
Savoy-Carignano
line
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Gothic Architecture
Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
is an architectural style that flourished in Europe
Europe
during the High and Late Middle Ages. It evolved from Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
and was succeeded by Renaissance
Renaissance
architecture. Originating in 12th century France
France
and lasting into the 16th century, Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
was known during the period as Opus Francigenum ("French work") with the term Gothic first appearing during the later part of the Renaissance. Its characteristics include the pointed arch, the ribbed vault (which evolved from the joint vaulting of Romanesque architecture) and the flying buttress. Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
is most familiar as the architecture of many of the great cathedrals, abbeys and churches of Europe
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World Heritage Site
A World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
is a landmark or area which is selected by the United Nations
United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as having cultural, historical, scientific or other form of significance, and is legally protected by international treaties. The sites are judged important to the collective interests of humanity. To be selected, a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
must be an already classified landmark, unique in some respect as a geographically and historically identifiable place having special cultural or physical significance (such as an ancient ruin or historical structure, building, city, complex, desert, forest, island, lake, monument, mountain, or wilderness area)
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King Of Italy
King of Italy
Italy
(Latin: Rex Italiae; Italian: Re d'Italia) was the title given to the ruler of the Kingdom of Italy
Kingdom of Italy
after the fall of the Western Roman Empire. The first to take the title was Odoacer, a "barbarian" military leader, in the late 5th century, followed by the Ostrogothic kings up to the mid-6th century. With the Frankish conquest of Italy
Italy
in the 8th century, the Carolingians
Carolingians
assumed the title, which was maintained by subsequent Holy Roman Emperors throughout the Middle Ages. The last Emperor to claim the title was Charles V in the 16th century
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Shroud Of Turin
The Shroud of Turin
Turin
or Turin
Turin
Shroud (Italian: Sindone di Torino, Sacra Sindone [ˈsaːkra ˈsindone] or Santa Sindone) is a length of linen cloth bearing the image of a man who is alleged to be Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth. The cloth itself is believed by some to be the burial shroud he was wrapped in when he was buried after crucifixion although three radiocarbon dating tests in 1988 dated a sample of the cloth to the Middle Ages.[1] The shroud is kept in the royal chapel of the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist in Turin, northern Italy
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Landscape Designer
Landscape design
Landscape design
is an independent profession and a design and art tradition, practised by landscape designers, combining nature and culture. In contemporary practice, landscape design bridges the space between landscape architecture and garden design.[1]Contents1 Design
Design
scope 2 Design
Design
approach 3 Training 4 Gardening 5 See also 6 References Design
Design
scope[edit]Knot Garden at Little Moreton Hall, Cheshire Landscape design
Landscape design
focuses on both the integrated master landscape planning of a property and the specific garden design of landscape elements and plants within it. The practical, aesthetic, horticultural, and environmental sustainability are also components of landscape design. It is often divided into hardscape design and softscape design
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Gardens Of Versailles
The Gardens of Versailles
Gardens of Versailles
(French: Jardins du château de Versailles; French pronunciation: ​[ʒaʁdɛ̃ dy ʃato də versaij]) occupy part of what was once the Domaine royal de Versailles, the royal demesne of the château of Versailles. Situated to the west of the palace, the gardens cover some 800 hectares of land, much of which is landscaped in the classic French Garden style perfected here by André Le Nôtre
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Palace Of Versailles
The Palace of Versailles
Palace of Versailles
(French: Château
Château
de Versailles), or simply Versailles (English: /vɛərˈsaɪ/ vair-SY or /vərˈsaɪ/ vər-SY; French: [vɛʁsaj]), is a royal château in Versailles in the Île-de-France
Île-de-France
region of France. It is now open as a museum and is a very popular tourist attraction. When the château was built, the community of Versailles was a small village dating from the 11th century. Today, however, it is a wealthy suburb of Paris, some 20 kilometres (12 mi) southwest of the centre of the French capital.[1] Versailles was the seat of political power in the Kingdom of France
France
from 1682, when King Louis XIV
Louis XIV
moved the royal court from Paris, until the royal family was forced to return to the capital in October 1789, within three months after the beginning of the French Revolution
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Landscape Garden
The English landscape garden, also called English landscape park or simply the English garden (French: Jardin à l'anglaise, Italian: Giardino all'inglese, German: Englischer Landschaftsgarten, Portuguese: Jardim inglês, Spanish: Jardín inglés), is a style of "landscape" garden which emerged in England
England
in the early 18th century, and spread across Europe, replacing the more formal, symmetrical jardin à la française of the 17th century as the principal gardening style of Europe.[1] The English garden presented an idealized view of nature
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Doric Order
The Doric order
Doric order
was one of the three orders of ancient Greek and later Roman architecture; the other two canonical orders were the Ionic and the Corinthian. The Doric is most easily recognized by the simple circular capitals at the top of columns. It was the earliest and in its essence the simplest of the orders, though still with complex details in the entablature above. The Greek Doric column was fluted or smooth-surfaced,[1] and had no base, dropping straight into the stylobate or platform on which the temple or other building stood. The capital was a simple circular form, with some mouldings, under a square cushion that is very wide in early versions, but later more restrained
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Dacha
A dacha (Russian: да́ча, IPA: [ˈdatɕə] ( listen)) is a seasonal or year-round second home, often located in the exurbs of Russian and other post-Soviet cities.[1] A cottage (коттедж, kottedzh) or shack serving as a family's main or only home, or an outbuilding, is not considered a dacha,[1] although some dachas recently have been converted to year-round residences and vice versa. In some cases, owners occupy their dachas for part of the year and rent them to urban residents as summer retreats. People living in dachas are colloquially called dachniki (дачники); the term usually refers not only to dacha dwellers but to a distinctive lifestyle.[2] The Russian term is often said to have no exact counterpart in English.[3][4] Dachas are common in Russia, and are also widespread in most parts of the former Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and in some countries of the former Eastern Bloc
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Lantern
Today, the term lantern is used to describe many types of portable lighting, but lanterns originated as a protective enclosure for a light source—usually a candle or a wick in oil—to make it easier to carry and hang up, and more practical outdoors or in drafty interiors. Lanterns were usually made from a metal frame with several sides, usually four, but up to eight, commonly with a hook or hoop of metal on top. Windows of some translucent material would be fitted in the sides, now usually glass or plastic but formerly thin sheets of animal horn, or tinplate punched with holes or decorative patterns; though some antique lanterns have only a metal grid, clearly indicating their function was that outlined below. Though primarily used to prevent a burning candle or wick being extinguished, another important function was to reduce the risk of fire should a spark leap from the flame or the light be dropped
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Nicholas II Of Russia
Nicholas II or Nikolai II, Saint
Saint
Nicholas II of Russia
Russia
in the Russian Orthodox Church (Russian: Николай II Алекса́ндрович, tr. Nikolay II Aleksandrovich; 18 May [O.S
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Piedmont
Piedmont
Piedmont
(/ˈpiːdmɒnt/ PEED-mont; Italian: Piemonte, pronounced [pjeˈmonte]; Piedmontese, Occitan and Arpitan: Piemont; French: Piémont) is a region in northwest Italy, one of the 20 regions of the country.[3] It borders the Liguria
Liguria
region to the south, the Lombardy
Lombardy
and Emilia-Romagna
Emilia-Romagna
regions to the east and the Aosta Valley
Aosta Valley
region to the northwest; it also borders France
France
to the west and Switzerland
Switzerland
to the northeast. It has an area of 25,402 square kilometres (9,808 sq mi) and a population of 4,396,293 as of 31 July 2016
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Racconigi Bargain
On 24 October 1909 King Victor Emmanuel III of Italy and Nicholas II of Russian Empire concluded an agreement at Racconigi, known as the Racconigi Bargain. It states that:If Russia or Italy are to conclude agreements concerning Eastern Europe with another Power in future, the other party of this agreement must also participate in such new agreement. Italy recognizes the Bosphorus should be controlled by Russia while in return Russia recognizes Italian interests in Tripoli and Cyrenaica.References[edit]This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations
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