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Castle Ward
Castle Ward
Castle Ward
is an 18th-century[1] National Trust property located near the village of Strangford, in County Down, Northern Ireland, in the townland of the same name. It overlooks Strangford
Strangford
Lough and is 7 miles from Downpatrick
Downpatrick
and 1.5 miles from Strangford. Castle Ward
Castle Ward
is open to the public and includes 332 hectares (820 acres) of landscaped gardens,[1] a fortified tower house, Victorian laundry, theatre, restaurant, shop, saw mill and a working corn mill. It has a shore on Strangford
Strangford
Lough
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Hezlett House
Hezlett House
Hezlett House
is a 17th-century thatched cottage located in Castlerock, County Londonderry. Built around 1691,[1] it is one of the oldest buildings still in use anywhere in Ulster. The cottage has a cruck structure and is situated at the crossroads near the village. It was originally a rectory or farmhouse.[1] See also[edit]Downhill EstateReferences[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Hezlett House.Inline^ a b Eccles, J (1996). Downhill: A Scrapbook of People and Place. London: Printing Ideas & Graphics. p. 84. Other"Downhill Demesne and Hezlett House". National Trust.  "Hezlett House". Discover Northern Ireland.  "National Trust: Hezlett House". Listings
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Opera Festival
This is an inclusive list of opera festivals and summer opera seasons, and music festivals which have opera productions. This list may have some overlap with list of early music festivals. Opera is part of the Western classical music tradition, and has long been performed for audiences on a large-scale format. It started in Italy at the end of the 16th century and soon spread through the rest of Europe. In the 18th century, Italian opera continued to dominate most of Europe (except France), attracting foreign composers such as Handel. Opera seria was the most prestigious form of Italian opera, until Gluck reacted against its artificiality with his "reform" operas in the 1760s
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Downhill Estate
The Mussenden Temple
Mussenden Temple
and Downhill Demesne
Demesne
is a National Trust
National Trust
property consisting of Downhill Castle
Downhill Castle
and its estate, which includes the Mussenden Temple. See also[edit]Hezlett HouseReferences[edit]"Downhill Demesne
Demesne
and Hezlett House". National Trust.  " Mussenden Temple
Mussenden Temple
and Downhill Demesne". Discover Northern Ireland.  Stewart, Linda (17 April 2013). "Walk of the Week: Mussenden Temple & Downhill Demesne". Belfast Telegraph. Retrieved 12 August 2014. This article about a Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
building or structure is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article related to the geography of County Londonderry, Northern Ireland is a stub
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Ardress House
Annaghmore (/ænəˈmɔːr/ ann-ə-MOR; from Irish: Eanach Mór, meaning "great marsh")[1] is a small village and townland (of 786 acres) near Loughgall in County Armagh, Northern Ireland. It is situated in the civil parish of Loughgall and the historic barony of Oneilland West.[2] It is within the Armagh City and District Council area. It had a population of 265 people (93 households) in the 2011 Census.[3] (2001 Census: 255 people)Contents1 Places of interest 2 The Troubles 3 Education 4 Former railway 5 Sports 6 See also 7 ReferencesPlaces of interest[edit] Ardress House, Annaghmore, was originally a modest farmhouse which was transformed in 1760 by Dublin architect George Ensor. It is run by the National Trust and contains examples of 18th century furniture and a display of paintings. It includes plasterwork in the drawing room made by Michael Stapleton in 1780. The farmyard and outbuildings show aspects of farming history with a display of farm implements
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Grey Abbey
Grey Abbey
Grey Abbey
is a ruined Cistercian
Cistercian
priory in the village of Greyabbey, County Down, Northern Ireland, currently maintained by the Northern Ireland Environment Agency. It is a monument in state care in the townland of Rosemount, beside the Rosemount estate, on the eastern edge of the village of Greyabbey
Greyabbey
in the Ards and North Down
Ards and North Down
local government district, at grid ref: J5829 6810.[1][2] History[edit] Grey Abbey
Grey Abbey
was founded in 1193,[3] by John de Courcy's wife, Affreca (daughter of Godred Olafsson, King of the Isles), as a daughter house of Holmcultram Abbey
Holmcultram Abbey
in Cumbria. It had declined by the late Middle Ages and was dissolved in 1541.[2] It was burnt out by Brian O'Neill in 1572
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Carrickfergus Castle
Carrickfergus
Carrickfergus
Castle
Castle
(from the Irish Carraig Ḟergus or "cairn of Fergus", the name "Fergus" meaning "strong man") is a Norman Irish castle in Northern Ireland, situated in the town of Carrickfergus
Carrickfergus
in County Antrim, on the northern shore of Belfast Lough. Besieged in turn by the Scottish, Irish, English and French, the castle played an important military role until 1928 and remains one of the best preserved medieval structures in Northern Ireland. It was strategically useful, with 3/4 of the castle perimeter surrounded by water (although in modern times only 1/3 is surrounded by water due to land reclamation)
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Northern Ireland Environment Agency
The Northern Ireland Environment Agency
Environment Agency
(NIEA) is an executive agency within the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA)
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William E. Ward House
The William E. Ward House, known locally as Ward's Castle, is located on Magnolia Drive, on the state line between Rye Brook, New York and Greenwich, Connecticut, United States. It is a reinforced concrete structure built in the 1870s. Ward, a mechanical engineer, built the house with his friend Robert Mook to demonstrate the viability of the material for building. It is the first reinforced concrete building in the United States.[2] It was later purchased by Mort Walker, creator of the comic strip Beetle Bailey, who opened it as the Museum of Cartoon Art until 1992.[3]Contents1 Building 2 History 3 See also 4 ReferencesBuilding[edit] The house is located in a residential neighborhood a short distance from where state highway NY 120A leaves the state line for a southwesterly heading into downtown Port Chester. Most of the house's 8-acre (3.2 ha) lot is located on the Connecticut side of the state line, where it is open and slopes downward to the east and the Byram River
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Bristol
Urban Chris Skidmore
Chris Skidmore
(Con) Jack Lopresti
Jack Lopresti
(Con)Area •&#
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Finial
A finial or hip-knob is an element marking the top or end of some object, often formed to be a decorative feature. In architecture it is a decorative device, typically carved in stone, employed to emphasize the apex of a dome, spire, tower, roof, or gable or any of various distinctive ornaments at the top, end, or corner of a building or structure. Where there are several such elements they may be called pinnacles. Smaller finials in materials such as metal or wood are used as a decorative ornament on the tops or ends of poles or rods such as tent-poles or curtain rods or any object such as a piece of furniture. These are frequently seen on top of bed posts or clocks. Decorative finials are also commonly used to fasten lampshades, and as an ornamental element at the end of the handles of souvenir spoons
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Gothic Revival Architecture
Gothic Revival (also referred to as Victorian Gothic or neo-Gothic) is an architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England. Its popularity grew rapidly in the early 19th century, when increasingly serious and learned admirers of neo-Gothic styles sought to revive medieval Gothic architecture, in contrast to the neoclassical styles prevalent at the time
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Pediment
A pediment is an architectural element found particularly in classical, neoclassical and baroque architecture, and its derivatives, consisting of a gable, usually of a triangular shape, placed above the horizontal structure of the entablature, typically supported by columns. The tympanum, the triangular area within the pediment, is often decorated with relief sculpture.Contents1 History 2 Gallery 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The pediment is found in classical Greek temples, renaissance, and neoclassical architecture. A prominent example is the Parthenon, where it contains a tympanum decorated with figures in relief sculpture. This architectural element was developed in the architecture of ancient Greece. In Ancient Rome, the Renaissance, and later architectural revivals, the pediment was used as a non-structural element over windows, doors and aedicules.Swan-neck pediment at the Rev
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Palladian Architecture
Palladian architecture
Palladian architecture
is a European style of architecture derived from and inspired by the designs of the Venetian architect Andrea Palladio
Palladio
(1508–1580). That which is recognised as Palladian architecture today is an evolution of Palladio's original concepts. Palladio's work was strongly based on the symmetry, perspective and values of the formal classical temple architecture of the Ancient Greeks and Romans. From the 17th century Palladio's interpretation of this classical architecture was adapted as the style known as Palladianism. It continued to develop until the end of the 18th century. Palladianism became popular briefly in Britain during the mid-17th century, but its flowering was cut short by the onset of the English Civil War and the imposition of austerity which followed
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Provisional Irish Republican Army
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(incl. British Army, Royal Ulster Constabulary[5][6][7] Ulster
Ulster
loyalist paramilitaries[8] Republic of Ireland
Republic of Ireland
"Free State" (An Garda Síochána ; Irish Army (Although the IRA's own rules prohibited their Volunteers from carrying out attacks against the "Free State".)The Provisional Irish Republican Army
Irish Republican Army
(IRA or Provisional IRA) was[9][10][11][12] an Irish republican paramilitary organisation that sought end of British involvement in Northern Ireland[13], facilitate the reunification of Ireland
Ireland
and to bring about an independent socialist[2] republic encompassing all of Ireland.[14][15] It was the biggest and most active republican paramilitary group during the Troubles
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National Trust For Places Of Historic Interest Or Natural Beauty
The National Trust, formally the National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, is a conservation organisation in England, Wales
Wales
and Northern Ireland, and the largest membership organisation in the United Kingdom.[citation needed] The trust describes itself as "a charity that works to preserve and protect historic places and spaces—for ever, for everyone".[2] The trust was founded in 1895 and given statutory powers, starting with the National Trust Act 1907. Historically, the trust tended to focus on English country houses, which still make up the largest part of its holdings, but it also protects historic landscapes such as in the Lake District, historic urban properties, and nature reserves. In Scotland, there is an independent National Trust for Scotland
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