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Casey At The Bat
"Casey at the Bat: A Ballad
Ballad
of the Republic Sung in the Year 1888" is a baseball poem written in 1888 by Ernest Thayer. First published in The San Francisco Examiner
The San Francisco Examiner
(then called The Daily Examiner) on June 3, 1888, it was later popularized by DeWolf Hopper
DeWolf Hopper
in many vaudeville performances.[1][2] It has become one of the best-known poems in American literature
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Prairie Home Companion
A Prairie
Prairie
Home Companion is a weekly radio variety show created and hosted by Garrison Keillor
Garrison Keillor
that aired live from 1974 to 2016. In 2016, musician Chris Thile
Chris Thile
took over as host, and the successor show was eventually renamed Live from Here. The show aired on Saturdays from the Fitzgerald Theater
Fitzgerald Theater
in Saint Paul, Minnesota; it was also frequently heard on tours to New York City
New York City
and other US cities. The show is known for its musical guests, especially folk and traditional musicians, tongue-in-cheek radio drama, and relaxed humor
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Mustache Cup
The moustache cup (or mustache cup) is a drinking cup with a semicircular ledge inside. The ledge has a half moon-shaped opening to allow the passage of liquids and serves as a guard to keep moustaches dry. It is generally acknowledged to have been invented in the 1860s by British potter Harvey Adams (born 1835).[1]Contents1 Historic context 2 Invention 3 Production 4 Decline and resurge 5 In popular culture 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistoric context[edit] Moustaches flourished throughout the Victorian era. In fact, from 1860 to 1916, the British military actually required all of its soldiers to sport a moustache for the authority it imparted to the moustachioed man.[2] Often, moustache wax was applied to the moustache to keep it stiff, with every hair in place. When drinking hot liquids, steam from the drink would melt the wax, which would drip into the cup
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Current Literature
Current Literature
Current Literature
(1888–1925) was an American magazine published in New York City. It should not be confused with the UK magazine of the same title. Its first owner and editor, Frederick Somers, debuted the periodical in July 1888. [1] Editors and contributors included: George W. Cable, Bliss Carman, Leonard D. Abbott, William Bayard Hale, William George Jordan, [2] [3] and George Sylvester Viereck. Current Literature
Current Literature
was intended initially "to deal with current literature in an eclectic way." As the publication developed over time, it began to resemble an illustrated news magazine in form and content, a process that was accelerated in March 1903 when the publication absorbed a younger competing publication, the Boston-based Current History
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Leonard Koppett
Leonard Koppett (September 15, 1923 – June 22, 2003) was an American sportswriter. Born in Moscow, Koppett moved with his family from Russia
Russia
to the United States
United States
when he was five years old. They lived in The Bronx, New York, a block away from Yankee Stadium, sparking his early interest in sports. A graduate of Columbia University, he was a reporter and columnist for the New York Herald Tribune, the New York Post, The New York Times, the Peninsula Times Tribune, and The Sporting News, and he authored 16 books on sports. He also published a number of magazine articles
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Recitation
A recitation in a general sense is the act of reciting from memory, or a formal reading of verse or other writing before an audience.[1][2]Contents1 Academic recitation 2 Religious recitation 3 Recitation as a performing art 4 Notes 5 ReferencesAcademic recitation[edit]Caesar, Bellum Gallicum 1,1, spoken by a German, exaggerated to hear the stressed syllables.In academia, recitation is a presentation made by a student to demonstrate knowledge of a subject or to provide instruction to others. In some academic institutions the term is used for a presentation by a teaching assistant or instructor, under the guidance of a senior faculty member, that supplements course materials
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Comic Opera
Comic opera denotes a sung dramatic work of a light or comic nature, usually with a happy ending. Forms of comic opera first developed in late 17th-century Italy. By the 1730s, a new operatic genre, opera buffa, emerged as an alternative to opera seria. It quickly made its way to France, where it became opéra bouffon, and eventually, in the following century, French operetta, with Jacques Offenbach
Jacques Offenbach
as its most accomplished practitioner. The influence of the Italian and French forms spread to other parts of Europe. Many countries developed their own genres of comic opera, incorporating the Italian and French models along with their own musical traditions
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Prinz Methusalem
See also:List of operettas by Johann Strauss IIv t e Prinz Methusalem
Prinz Methusalem
(Prince Methusalem) is an operetta written by Johann Strauss II to a libretto by Karl Treumann, after Victor Wilder and Alfred Delacourt. It was first performed on January 3, 1877 in Vienna at the Carltheater. It achieved a run of eighty performances.[1] The pot-pourri overture incorporates themes from the operetta, as well as other material that might have sometime been part of the planned score. Roles[edit]Role Voice type Premiere cast, 3 January 1877 (Conductor: Johann Strauss II)Herzog von Rikarak bass Josef MatrasPrinz Methusalem mezzo-soprano / tenor-baritone Antonie LinkPulcinella soprano Caroline FinalySigismund baritone Wilhelm KnaackSophistica mezzo-soprano Therese Braunecker-SchäferReferences[edit]^ "Strauss II, J.: Famous Overtures CD". NaxosDirect. Archived from the original on May 5, 2009
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Chicago Cubs
The Chicago
Chicago
Cubs are an American professional baseball team based in Chicago, Illinois. The Cubs compete in Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) as a member club of the National League
National League
(NL) Central division. The team plays its home games at Wrigley Field, located on the city's North Side. The Cubs are one of two major league teams in Chicago; the other, the Chicago
Chicago
White Sox, is a member of the American League
American League
(AL) Central division. The Cubs, first known as the White Stockings, was a founding member of the NL in 1876, becoming the Chicago
Chicago
Cubs in 1903.[2] The Cubs have appeared in a total of eleven World Series
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San Francisco Giants
The San Francisco
San Francisco
Giants are an American professional baseball franchise based in San Francisco, California. Founded in 1883 as the New York Gothams, and renamed three years later to the New York Giants, the team eventually moved to San Francisco
San Francisco
in 1958. The Giants compete in Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
(MLB) as a member club of the National League
National League
(NL) West division. As one of the longest-established and most successful professional baseball teams, the franchise has won the most games of any team in the history of American baseball.[6] The team was the first major league team based in New York City, most memorably playing at the legendary Polo Grounds. They have won 23 NL pennants and have played in 20 World Series
World Series
competitions – both NL records
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Epitome
An epitome (/ɪˈpɪtəmiː/; Greek: ἐπιτομή, from ἐπιτέμνειν epitemnein meaning "to cut short") is a summary or miniature form, or an instance that represents a larger reality, also used as a synonym for embodiments.[citation needed] Epitomacy represents, "to the degree of." An abridgment differs from an epitome in that an abridgment is made of selected quotations of a larger work; no new writing is composed, as opposed to the epitome, which is an original summation of a work, at least in part. Many documents from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
and Roman worlds survive now only "in epitome", referring to the practice of some later authors (epitomators) who wrote distilled versions of larger works now lost. Some writers attempted to convey the stance and spirit of the original, while others added further details or anecdotes regarding the general subject
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Baseball League
This article contains a list of organized baseball leagues.Contents1 International competition 2 Americas2.1 United States2.1.1 Youth Leagues & Major Organizations 2.1.2 High school 2.1.3 Alternative baseball 2.1.4 Amateur baseball 2.1.5 College baseball 2.1.6 Town Team Baseball 2.1.7 Semi-professional baseball 2.1.8 Professional baseball2.2 Others 2.3 Defunct Leagues3 Asia3.1 Japan 3.2 South Korea 3.3 Taiwan 3.4 China 3.5 Philippines 3.6 Defunct Leagues4 Europe 5 Oceania 6 See also 7 ReferencesInternational competition[edit] See also: Baseball
Baseball
§ Around-the-world
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Boston
Boston
Boston
(/ˈbɒstən/ ( listen) BOS-tən) is the capital city and most populous municipality[9] of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States
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Tragedy
Tragedy
Tragedy
(from the Greek: τραγῳδία, tragōidia[a]) is a form of drama based on human suffering that invokes an accompanying catharsis or pleasure in audiences.[2][3] While many cultures have developed forms that provoke this paradoxical response, the term tragedy often refers to a specific tradition of drama that has played a unique and important role historically in the self-definition of Western civilisation.[2][4] That tradition has been multiple and discontinuous, yet the term has often been used to invoke a powerful effect of cultural identity and historical continuity—"the Greeks and the Elizabethans, in one cultural form; Hel
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