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Casa Buonarroti
Casa Buonarroti
Casa Buonarroti
is a museum in Florence. The building was a property owned by (but never occupied by) the sculptor Michelangelo, which he left to his nephew, Lionardo Buonarroti. The house was converted into a museum dedicated to the artist by his great nephew, Michelangelo Buonarroti the Younger. Its collections include two of Michelangelo's earliest sculptures, the Madonna of the Steps
Madonna of the Steps
and the Battle of the Centaurs. A ten-thousand strong library has accumulated there over the centuries,[1] which includes the family's archive and some of Michaelangelo's letters and drawings.[2] References[edit]^ " Casa Buonarroti
Casa Buonarroti
- Library". Archived from the original on 2011-07-21. Retrieved 2012-11-10.  ^ Symonds (1893)
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San Salvatore Al Vescovo
San Salvatore al Vescovo
San Salvatore al Vescovo
is a church located in Florence, Italy. It was first built in the 11th century and has had several subsequent modifications. The lower portion of the facade is built in a Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
style with bi-colored marble decorations.[1] References[edit]^ Zucconi, Guido (1995). Florence: An Architectural Guide (November 2001 Reprint ed.). San Giovanni Lupatoto, Verona, Italy: Arsenale Editrice. ISBN 88-7743-147-4. Coordinates: 43°46′22.97″N 11°15′14.97″E / 43.7730472°N 11.2541583°E / 43.7730472; 11.2541583This article about a church building or other Christian place of worship in Italy
Italy
is a stub
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Italy
Coordinates: 43°N 12°E / 43°N 12°E / 43; 12Italian Republic Repubblica Italiana  (Italian)FlagEmblemAnthem: Il Canto degli Italiani  (Italian) "The Song of the Italians"Location of  Italy  (dark green) – in Europe  (light green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (light green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Rome 41°54′N 12°29′E / 41.900°N 12.483°E / 41.900; 12.483Official languages ItalianaNative languages see full listReligion83.3% Christians 12.4% irreligious 3.7% Muslims 0.2% Buddhists 0.1% Hindus 0.3% other religions[1]Demonym ItalianGovernment Unitary constitutional parliamentary republic• PresidentSergio Mattarella• Prime MinisterPaolo Gentiloni• President of the SenateElisabetta Casellati•&
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Oratorio Dei Vanchetoni
An oratorio (Italian pronunciation: [oraˈtɔːrjo]) is a large musical composition for orchestra, choir, and soloists.[1] Like an opera, an oratorio includes the use of a choir, soloists, an ensemble, various distinguishable characters, and arias. However, opera is musical theatre, while oratorio is strictly a concert piece – though oratorios are sometimes staged as operas, and operas are sometimes presented in concert form. In an oratorio there is generally little or no interaction between the characters, and no props or elaborate costumes. A particularly important difference is in the typical subject matter of the text
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John Addington Symonds
John Addington Symonds
John Addington Symonds
(/ˈsɪməndz/; 5 October 1840 – 19 April 1893) was an English poet and literary critic. A cultural historian, he was known for his work on the Renaissance, as well as numerous biographies of writers and artists. Although he married and had a family, he was an early advocate of male love (homosexuality), which he believed could include pederastic as well as egalitarian relationships, referring to it as l'amour de l'impossible (love of the impossible).[1] He also wrote much poetry inspired by his homosexual affairs.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Personal life 1.3 Career2 Legacy 3 Homosexuality
Homosexuality
and homosexual writings 4 Works 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Symonds was born at Bristol, England in 1840. His father, the senior John Addington Symonds, M.D
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Tourism In Italy
With 52.4 million tourists a year (2016), Italy
Italy
is the fifth most visited country in international tourism arrivals.[1] People mainly visit Italy
Italy
for its rich culture, cuisine, history, fashion and art, its beautiful coastline and beaches, its mountains, and priceless ancient monuments
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Basilica Of San Lorenzo, Florence
A basilica is a type of building, usually a church, that is typically rectangular with a central nave and aisles, usually with a slightly raised platform and an apse at one or both ends. In Europe and the Americas it is the most common architectural style for churches though this building plan has become less dominant in new buildings since the later 20th century. Today the term basilica is often used to refer to any large, ornate church building, especially Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
and Eastern Orthodox, even if it does not strictly follow this style. The basilican architectural style originated in ancient Rome and was originally used for public buildings where courts were held, as well as serving other official and public functions. The basilica was centrally located in every Roman town, usually adjacent to the main forum
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Florence
Florence
Florence
(/ˈflɒrəns/ FLORR-ənss; Italian: Firenze [fiˈrɛntse] ( listen))[2] is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany. It is the most populous city in Tuscany, with 383,083 inhabitants in 2013, and over 1,520,000 in its metropolitan area.[3] Florence
Florence
was a centre of medieval European trade and finance and one of the wealthiest cities of that era.[4] It is considered the birthplace of the Renaissance, and has been called "the Athens
Athens
of the Middle Ages".[5] A turbulent political history includes periods of rule by the powerful Medici family and numerous religious and republican revolutions.[6] From 1865 to 1871 the city was the capital of the recently established Kingdom of Italy
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Ognissanti, Florence
The chiesa di San Salvatore di Ognissanti or more simply chiesa di Ognissanti (Italian: [ˈkjɛːza di oɲɲisˈsanti]; "Church of All Saints"),[n 1] is a Franciscan church located on the piazza of the same name in central Florence, region of Tuscany, Italy. Founded by the lay order of the Umiliati, the church was dedicated to all the saints and martyrs, known and unknown.Facade Nave
Nave
of OgnissantiSt Jerome in his Study, fresco by Domenico Ghirlandaio, 1480History[edit] It was completed originally during the 1250s, but almost completely rebuilt around 1627 in Baroque-style by the architect Bartolomeo Pettirossi. Soon after, a new façade (1637) was erected using designs by Matteo Nigetti,[n 2] that conserved the glazed terracotta lunette over the doorway, which while resembling the work of Della Robbia, is now attributed to Benedetto Buglioni
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Oratory Of Gesù Pellegrino
Coordinates: 43°46′42.46″N 11°15′27.28″E / 43.7784611°N 11.2575778°E / 43.7784611; 11.2575778 The Oratory of Gesù Pellegrino, also called the Oratorio dei Pretoni, is a Roman Catholic prayer hall or small church found on the corner of Via San Gallo and via degli Arazzieri in Florence, region of Tuscany, Italy.FacadeContents1 History 2 Gallery of Frescoes by Giovanni Balducci 3 Sources 4 External linksHistory[edit]Frescoed interior wallsFormerly the church of San Salvatore, it belonged to the confraternity of that name, until in 1313 the bishop Antonio d’Orso instituted a hospice for pilgrim priests. The church was later dedicated to St James, and under the sainted Archbishop Antoninus, the confraternity set up a hospice for elderly priests. In 1585 to 1588, commissioned by Alessandro de' Medici, restructuring was directed by Giovanni Antonio Dosio
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Oratory Of St Thomas Aquinas (Florence)
The Oratory of St. Thomas Aquinas is a late-Renaissance-style, Roman Catholic prayer hall located on Via della Pergola in Florence, region of Tuscany, Italy. History[edit] The simple facade stands across the street from the Hospital of Santa Maria Nuova; it was initially the site of the Congregation of the Noble Contemplatives (Congregazione dei Contemplanti dei Nobili), founded by a Dominican monk, named fra Santi di Cini, from the Convent of San Marco. In 1568, the painter Santi di Tito, designed the oratory for the confraternity, and it was dedicated it to St Thomas Aquinas. Santi also painted the altarpiece of the Crucifixion and St Thomas Aquinas (in restoration). The vestibule has quadratura painted in 1782 by the painters Grix and Stagi. The altar has walls decorated in elaborate and fine scagiole by Carlo Ghibertoni
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San Frediano In Cestello
San Frediano in Cestello
San Frediano in Cestello
is a Baroque-style, Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
church in the Oltrarno
Oltrarno
section of Florence, region of Tuscany, Italy. The name cestello derives from the Cistercians
Cistercians
who occupied the church in 1628. Previously the site had a 1450s church attached to the cloistered Carmelite
Carmelite
convent of Santa Maria degli Angeli. History[edit] The church is dedicated to St Fridianus, an early Christian Irish pilgrim who became bishop of Lucca; putatively he miraculously crossed a swollen Arno river near this spot. A church at the site was present before the 11th century.[1] Starting during the papacy of Paul II in the 1460s, the church and adjacent convent were patronized by the Soderini Family
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San Gaetano, Florence
San Gaetano, also known as Santi Michele e Gaetano, is a Baroque church in Florence, Italy, located on the Piazza Antinori.Contents1 History 2 Exterior 3 Interior3.1 Statues of Apostoles and Evangelists4 ReferencesHistory[edit] A Romanesque church, dedicated solely to Saint Michael
Saint Michael
the Archangel, had been located at the site for centuries prior to its Baroque reconstruction. Patronized by the Theatine order, the new church was dedicated to Saint Cajetan, one of the founders of the order, though the church could not formally be named after him until his canonisation in 1671. Funding for this reconstruction was obtained from the noble families in Florence, including the Medicis. Cardinal Carlo de' Medici
Medici
was particularly concerned with the work, and his name is inscribed on the façade. Building took place between 1604 and 1648
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San Giovannino Degli Scolopi
The church of San Giovannino degli Scolopi
San Giovannino degli Scolopi
is a minor church in the center of Florence, located on Via Martelli corner with Via Gori. From 1351 to 1554, the church was known as San Giovanni Evangelista, since the site had a small oratory dedicated to the saint. In the mid-16th century, Cosimo I applied the inheritance of a Giovanni di Lando of the neighboring Gori family to the erection of a church for the newly arrived Jesuits
Jesuits
(1577). Construction began two years later on designs of Bartolommeo Ammannati, afterwards supplanted by Giulio Parigi and finally Alfonso Parigi il Giovane, who completed the work in 1661. The Jesuit Order was suppressed in 1775, and the church was passed to the Piarist
Piarist
or Scolopi Fathers
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San Giovannino Dei Cavalieri
San Giovannino dei Cavalieri
San Giovannino dei Cavalieri
(Young St. John the Baptist of the Knights) previously named Church of San Giovanni Decollato (Decapitated St. John), is a parish church situated in Via San Gallo in central Florence, Italy. Initially the site held a 14th-century home for women of "easy virtue" and dedicated to St. Mary Magdalen, it was renamed after the patron saint of the Cavalieri or Knights of Malta. Rebuilt from 1553-1784, with facade added in 1699. Presently it contains a Coronation of the Virgin by Neri di Bicci, a Nativity by Bicci di Lorenzo, an Annunciation attributed to the Master of Stratonice, a Decapitation of St. John the Baptist by Pietro Dandini, vault frescoes by Alessandro Gherardini, a painted cross in the apse by Lorenzo Monaco, and a Last Supper by Palma il Giovane. References[edit]Borsook, Eve (1991). Vincent Cronin (general editor), ed. The Companion Guide to Florence. Harper Collins
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